The relevance of indigenous knowledge for nursing curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112602
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Della Stansfield
Annette J Browne
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Island University, 900 Fifth St., Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5, Canada. Della.Stansfield@viu.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Curriculum
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Professional Competence
Rural Nursing - education
Abstract
Indigenous knowledge (IK) has the potential to complement the dominant epistemologies central to nursing curricula. Acknowledging IK as a thriving set of worldviews, we discuss how nursing educators might access and integrate IK in ways that are respectful and sustainable. IK is highlighted as an entry point for understanding concepts such as cultural safety, ethical space, and relational practice and as a strength-based approach to learning about Aboriginal people's health. As with any use of knowledge, consideration must be given to issues of ownership, misappropriation, institutional responsibility, Indigenous protocol, and the creation of partnerships. Recommendations are provided for educators wishing to explore how to incorporate IK into nursing curriculum. With appropriate partnerships, protocols, and processes in place, the incorporation of IK may provide educators and students an opportunity to explore divergent epistemologies, philosophies, and worldviews, thereby encouraging broader perspectives about the world, ways of being, various types of knowledge, and nursing care.
PubMed ID
23813335 View in PubMed
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