Cladotanytarsus saetheri sp. nov. and C. gedanicus Gilka: Holarctic sibling species (Diptera: Chironomidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292062
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 14; 4394(3):428-436
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-14-2018
Author
Mateusz Puchalski
Lauri Paasivirta
Wojciech GiLka
Author Affiliation
University of Gdansk, Faculty of Biology, Department of Invertebrate Zoology and Parasitology, Laboratory of Systematic Zoology; Wita Stwosza 59, 80-308 Gdansk, Poland. user@example.com.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 14; 4394(3):428-436
Date
Mar-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Chironomidae
Colorado
Diptera
Far East
Male
Manitoba
New Mexico
Russia
South Carolina
Wisconsin
Abstract
Cladotanytarsus saetheri, sp. nov., a widely distributed species (Fennoscandia; Russia: Far East; Canada: Manitoba; USA: Colorado, Michigan, South Carolina, Wisconsin) is described and compared with C. gedanicus Gilka, 2001 on the basis of new records (Fennoscandia; Canada: Manitoba, Nunavut; USA: Colorado, New Mexico). Intraspecific morphological variability of adult males is presented in order to delimit the two previously misidentified species.
PubMed ID
29690363 View in PubMed
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A revision of the genus Boroecia Poulsen 1973 (Ostracoda, Halocypridae) with the descriptions of three new species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292063
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 14; 4394(3):301-346
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-14-2018
Author
A StEpieN
K BLachowiak-samoLyk
M Krawczuk
M V Angel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences, 81-712 Sopot, Powstancow Warszawy 55, Poland. University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Poland. astepien@iopan.gda.pl.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 14; 4394(3):301-346
Date
Mar-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Coleoptera
Crustacea
Abstract
The halocyprid ostracod genus Boroecia Poulsen, 1973 is described in detail and Boroecia borealis (Sars, 1866) is nominated as type species. We unravel several taxonomic confusions and uncertainties in the earlier literature that had their origins in the classification of Boroecia maxima and Boroecia antipoda (Müller, 1906) as subspecies of Boroecia borealis. Three new species are described, B. alaska n. sp., and B. danae n. sp. from the Pacific and B. hopcrofti n. sp. from the high Arctic, bringing the total number of species in the genus to six. Five of the species are described in detail, the only exception is Boroecia maxima (Brady Norman, 1896), for which there is already a full description in the literature. Comparative illustrations are provided for all the species together with standardised meristic data. A key to the identity all six species is included.
PubMed ID
29690356 View in PubMed
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New information on the distribution pattern of Acanthobdella peledina (Annelida, Acanthobdellida) in Eastern Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292064
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 20; 4399(1):123-126
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-20-2018
Author
Irina A Kaygorodova
Elena V Dzyuba
Author Affiliation
Limnological Institute, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 Ulan-Batorskaya Street, 664033 Irkutsk, Russia. Irkutsk State University, 5 Sukhe Bator Street, 664003, Russia. irina@lin.irk.ru.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 20; 4399(1):123-126
Date
Mar-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Annelida
Ecology
Fishes
Leeches
Oligochaeta
Siberia
Abstract
The Acanthobdellida is a group of annelid parasites of fish, which are restricted to subarctic parts of the Northern Hemisphere. These ancient worms arouse the interest of the scientific world due to their mosaic combination of (1) primitive oligochaetous characters (e.g. the presence of setae on the very anterior segments, a lateral nerve system and a metameric coelomic cavity around the intestinal canal) and (2) evolutionarily advanced hirudinean ecological and morphological features (e.g. suckers and parasitic lifestyle), attesting to their intermediate role between Oligochaeta and Euhirudinea (i.e. leeches with setae).
PubMed ID
29690334 View in PubMed
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Fauna of tintinnids (Tintinnida, Ciliata) during an Arctic-Antarctic cruise, with the S/V "Croatian Tern".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292065
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 21; 4399(3):301-314
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-21-2018
Author
Frano KrŠiniC
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Šetalište I. Meštrovica 63, 21000 Split, Croatia.. fkrsinic@izor.hr.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 21; 4399(3):301-314
Date
Mar-21-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Charadriiformes
Ciliophora
Mediterranean Sea
Newfoundland and Labrador
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
An investigation of large tintinnids was carried out during the Arctic-Antarctic cruise aboard the S/V "Croatian Tern" in the period from 1994 to 1997. Samples were collected at 33 stations by vertical tows with a Nansen net with a 53 µm mesh size in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic, Labrador Sea, Baffin Bay, the Beaufort, Chukchi and Bering Seas, East North Pacific, South Pacific, South East Pacific, Scotia Sea, and South West Atlantic. A total of 47 species of tintinnids were found, with the greatest diversity in the Tropical areas of the Pacific, Arctic and Subarctic. A very high total abundance was registered in the Bering Sea of 247,393 ind.m-3 and in the South-eastern Pacific of 66,211 ind.m-3. The dominant species in the northern areas was Ptychocylis obtusa and in the southern areas Eutintinnus rugosus.
PubMed ID
29690314 View in PubMed
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Eleven new species of Spilogona Schnabl, 1911 (Diptera, Muscidae) from the Altai Mountains of Russia, with key to species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292066
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Apr 17; 4410(2):201-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-17-2018
Author
Vera S Sorokina
Author Affiliation
Zoological Museum of Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Frunze Street 11, Novosibirsk 630091, Russia.. sorokinavs@mail.ru.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Apr 17; 4410(2):201-250
Date
Apr-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures
Animals
Body Size
Diptera
Male
Muscidae
Organ Size
Russia
Abstract
Eleven new Spilogona species: Spilogona altaica sp. nov., Spilogona antoninae sp. nov., Spilogona colorata sp. nov., Spilogona decolorata sp. nov., Spilogona improvisa sp. nov., Spilogona insolita sp. nov., Spilogona longissima sp. nov., Spilogona novgorodovana sp. nov., Spilogona platyfrons sp. nov., Spilogona tanushka sp. nov., Spilogona tara sp. nov. and a key is provided to the 53 species known from the Altai Mountains including 21 species are newly recorded for the Altai, and seven of them also represent new records from Russia: Spilogona meadei (Schnabl, 1915), Spilogona orthosurstyla Xue Tian, 1988, Spilogona placida (Huckett, 1932), Spilogona setigera (Stein, 1907), Spilogona sororcula (Zetterstedt, 1845), Spilogona spinicosta (Stein, 1907), Spilogona stackelbergi Hennig, 1959). And four species represent new records for the Palaearctic Region: Spilogona flavinervis Huckett, 1965, Spilogona imitatrix (Malloch, 1921), Spilogona nutaka Huckett, 1965, Spilogona incerta Huckett, 1965. Three new synonymies are proposed: Spilogona impar (Stein, 1907) = Spilogona deflorata (Holmgren, 1872), Spilogona churchillensis Huckett, 1965 = Spilogona quinquesetosa (Schnabl, 1915), and Spilogona robusta Huckett, 1965 = Spilogona sordidipennis (Holmgren, 1883). The pictures of the new species are given and the male terminalia are figured. New faunistic data are given for some previously described species of Altai Spilogona.
PubMed ID
29690143 View in PubMed
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Influence of size reduction treatments on sugar recovery from Norway spruce for butanol production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292068
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Jun; 257:113-120
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Ming Yang
Minyuan Xu
Yufei Nan
Suvi Kuittinen
Md Kamrul Hassan
Jouko Vepsäläinen
Donglin Xin
Junhua Zhang
Ari Pappinen
Author Affiliation
College of Forestry, Northwest A&F University, 3 Taicheng Road, 712100 Yangling, China; School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI80101 Joensuu, Finland.
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Jun; 257:113-120
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
1-Butanol
Butanols
Carbohydrates
Fermentation
Hydrolysis
Norway
Sugars
Abstract
This study investigated whether the effectiveness of pretreatment is limited by a size reduction of Norway spruce wood in biobutanol production. The spruce was milled, chipped, and mashed for hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) and dilute acid (DA) pretreatment. Sugar recoveries from chipped and mashed spruce after enzymatic hydrolysis were higher than from milled spruce, and the recoveries were not correlated with the spruce fiber length. HPAC pretreatment resulted in almost 100% glucose and 88% total reducing sugars recoveries from chipped spruce, which were apparently higher than DA pretreatment, demonstrating greater effectiveness of HPAC pretreatment on sugar production. The butanol and ABE yield from chipped spruce were 126.5 and 201.2?g/kg pretreated spruce, respectively. The yields decreased with decreasing particle size due to biomass loss in the pretreatment. The results suggested that Norway spruce chipped to a 20?mm length is applicable to the production of platform sugars for butanol fermentation.
PubMed ID
29494838 View in PubMed
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Results of mammary glands topometry among yakut women with focus on age and importance of age in augmentation mammoplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292070
Source
Wiad Lek. 2017; 70(6 pt 1):1042-1046
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Darima K Garmaeva
Vladislav N Kazanov
Lena I Arzhakova
Aida I Fedorova
Oksana G Afanasyeva
Ekaterina P Sergyna
Author Affiliation
Medical Institute of North-Eastern Federal University Named After M. K. Ammosov, Yakutsk, Russia.
Source
Wiad Lek. 2017; 70(6 pt 1):1042-1046
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Breast Implantation
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Mammaplasty
Mammary Glands, Human
Young Adult
Abstract
Introduction: In connection with the development of plastic and aesthetic surgery, there is a steady growth in aesthetic mammoplasty. Modern aesthetics require an emphasis on and accentuation of mammary glands. For our region it is obvious that the physical and sexual development of girls living in the harsh continental climate of Yakutia has its own characteristics. In this regard, the issues of defining a clear standard diagnosis of the regional norm of mammary gland and adjacent topographic layers of the chest wall, as well as its shape, are becoming increasingly relevant. The aim: To identify the individual typological variability of the shape, size, and topometric characteristics of mammary glands of Yakut women with focus on age.
Materials and Methods: Morphometry of the mammary glands was performed in 72 Yakut women. The examined women were divided into the following age groups: group I - IV ( ages 20 -40). The measurements were performed using the Body Logic (Mentor Medical Systems BV - USA) System, where the following indicators were recorded anthropometric characteristics of the body, topometric and organometric characteristics of mammary glands women.
Results: The analysis of the obtained data showed that the bodyweight of the women being examined increases by ages 35-40. Dimensional parameters of the transverse diameter of the chest at the level of the submammary fold and at the level of the nipples were also greater in the older age group. Visual asymmetry MG relative to right and left sides is observed in the first age group (ages 26-35). The thickness of the dermal-glandular fold at the level of the lateral, medial and upper poles also tends to increase with age, with higher values on the left side in all groups. Submammary fold as anatomical structure is the key structure that determines the aesthetics of the mammary gland during its augmentation and mastopexy, it is the foundation on which the designs of mammoplasty are based. Its asymmetry is less noticeable in the older age group. When analyzing the size of the areola along the vertical and transverse lines, a pronounced tendency to increase in size with age is observed relative to the right and left sides.
Conclusions: Thus, as a result of the study, we determined the topo-morphometric parameters of the mammary glands of Yakut women of different age groups. It was observed that with sufficient symmetry of the mammary gland shape in most women in the study groups, there is an asymmetry in the structure of the shape of the chest, probably due to rickets-like conditions widespread in our region. The growth in the thickness of the skin-glandular fold is more pronounced in the fourth age group (ages 36-40), which indicates the hypertrophy of the MG tissues, which is an important factor when calculating the volume of the future implant. The index of extensibility in the lower pole of theMG is important for planning surgical intervention, since it indicates the state of the skin pocket for the implant. It is only natural that with age, MG tissues become susceptibleto natural gravitational ptosis, the same happens to the nipple-areolar complex, as evidenced by its largest transverse and vertical dimensions in the fourth age group. Whenplanning the intervention, these dimensions can be reduced using periareolar mastopexy.
PubMed ID
29478976 View in PubMed
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Performance and microbial community structure of a polar Arctic Circle aerobic granular sludge system operating at low temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292071
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 May; 256:22-29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
Alejandro Gonzalez-Martinez
Barbara Muñoz-Palazon
Paula Maza-Márquez
Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez
Jesus Gonzalez-Lopez
Riku Vahala
Author Affiliation
Department of Built Environment, School of Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15200, Aalto, FI-00076 Espoo, Finland. Electronic address: alejandro.gonzalezmartinez@aalto.fi.
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 May; 256:22-29
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Bioreactors
Cold Temperature
Nitrogen
Sewage
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Abstract
The aim of this work was to study the performance and microbial community structure of a polar Arctic Circle aerobic granular sludge (AGS) system operating at low temperature. Thus, an AGS bioreactor was operated at 7, 5 and 3?°C of temperature using a cold-adapted sludge from Lapland. At 5?°C, it yielded acceptable conversion rates, in terms of nitrogen, phosphorous, and organic matter. However, under 3?°C a negligible nitrogen and phosphorous removal performance was observed. Below 5?°C, scanning electron microscopy studies showed a wispy, non-dense and irregular granular structure with a strong outgrowth of filamentous. Moreover, Illumina next-generation sequencing showed a heterogeneous microbial population where SM1K20 (Archaea), Trichosporon domesticum (Fungus), and Zooglea, Arcobacter and Acinetobacter (Bacteria) were the dominant phylotypes. Our study suggests that AGS technologies inoculated with North Pole sludge could be operated, in cold regions for a period longer than 3?months (winter season) under 5?°C of water temperature.
PubMed ID
29428610 View in PubMed
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Spatial and temporal impacts of the Skjervøy harbour diesel spill on native population of blue mussels: A sub-Arctic case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292072
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 May 30; 153:168-174
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-30-2018
Author
Marine Breitwieser
Hélène Thomas-Guyon
Valérie Huet
Kjetil Sagerup
Perrine Geraudie
Author Affiliation
Littoral Environnement et Sociétés (LIENSs), UMR 7266, CNRS-Université de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01, France. Electronic address: marine.breitwieser@univ-lr.fr.
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 May 30; 153:168-174
Date
May-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Biomarkers - metabolism
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Gasoline - analysis - toxicity
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Mytilus edulis - drug effects - metabolism
Norway
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Petroleum Pollution - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis - toxicity
Seawater - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
This work was designed to investigate biological impacts on blue mussels (Mytilus edulis spp) after being exposed to diesel spill. On December 2013, an 180,000-litre accidental acute diesel spill was reported in a small harbour of northern Norway (Skjervøy). In order to assess the biological effects on the wild population of blue mussels, bivalves were collected at three different locations: at the oil-spill spot, at the other side of the harbour (opposite the oil-spill area), and in an uncontaminated site. Body burden and seawater samples were collected from a few days up to five months after the diesel spill. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and immunological effects were assessed in the blue mussels digestive glands. Our findings reported significant modulation of GST (detoxification), SOD (antioxidant response) and MDA (lipid peroxidation) in bivalves exposed to diesel with a similar response at two and five months after the spill. Laccase-type enzyme also highlighted an important aspect in terms of biomarker response of the immune function. Overall, our study demonstrated that some biomarkers returned to basal levels a few months after the diesel spill. Consequently, it highlighted the usefulness of normalised tools and guidelines for biomonitoring strategies after a diesel spill.
PubMed ID
29427978 View in PubMed
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Potential impacts of offshore oil spills on polar bears in the Chukchi Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292074
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:652-659
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Ryan R Wilson
Craig Perham
Deborah P French-McCay
Richard Balouskus
Author Affiliation
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 E Tudor Rd., Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. Electronic address: ryan_r_wilson@fws.gov.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:652-659
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Humans
Ice Cover
Petroleum Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Seasons
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
Sea ice decline is anticipated to increase human access to the Arctic Ocean allowing for offshore oil and gas development in once inaccessible areas. Given the potential negative consequences of an oil spill on marine wildlife populations in the Arctic, it is important to understand the magnitude of impact a large spill could have on wildlife to inform response planning efforts. In this study we simulated oil spills that released 25,000 barrels of oil for 30 days in autumn originating from two sites in the Chukchi Sea (one in Russia and one in the U.S.) and tracked the distribution of oil for 76 days. We then determined the potential impact such a spill might have on polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their habitat by overlapping spills with maps of polar bear habitat and movement trajectories. Only a small proportion (1-10%) of high-value polar bear sea ice habitat was directly affected by oil sufficient to impact bears. However, 27-38% of polar bears in the region were potentially exposed to oil. Oil consistently had the highest probability of reaching Wrangel and Herald islands, important areas of denning and summer terrestrial habitat. Oil did not reach polar bears until approximately 3 weeks after the spills. Our study found the potential for significant impacts to polar bears under a worst case discharge scenario, but suggests that there is a window of time where effective containment efforts could minimize exposure to bears. Our study provides a framework for wildlife managers and planners to assess the level of response that would be required to treat exposed wildlife and where spill response equipment might be best stationed. While the size of spill we simulated has a low probability of occurring, it provides an upper limit for planners to consider when crafting response plans.
PubMed ID
29339335 View in PubMed
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