Correlation between sperm motility and sperm chromatin structure assay parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63439
Source
Fertil Steril. 2003 Dec;80(6):1404-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Aleksander Giwercman
Jonas Richthoff
Henrik Hjøllund
Jens Peter Bonde
Katarina Jepson
Birgitta Frohm
Marcello Spano
Author Affiliation
Fertility Centre and Department of Urology, Scanian Andrology Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. aleksander.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Fertil Steril. 2003 Dec;80(6):1404-12
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatin - ultrastructure
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA - analysis
DNA Fragmentation
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Humans
Infertility, Male - epidemiology
Male
Military Personnel
Patient Selection
Pregnancy
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sperm Motility - physiology
Spermatozoa - cytology - physiology - ultrastructure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between chromatin structure and sperm motility. DESIGN: Cross-sectional prospective study. SETTING: Scanian Andrology Centre, Malmö, Sweden; ENEA Casaccia, Rome, Italy; and Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. PATIENT(S): One hundred seventy-one males from Danish first pregnancy planner couples (group 1) and 278 Swedish military conscripts (group 2). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) parameters, DNA fragmentation index (DFI), high DNA stainable (HDS), and sperm motility, which was evaluated manually and by use of computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA). RESULT(S): A statistically significant negative correlation between DFI and the CASA percentage of motile sperms (group 1: r = -0.53; group 2: r = -0.38) was found. For the manual motility assessment, the correlation coefficients were slightly lower. Furthermore, HDS correlated negatively with CASA sperm motility (group 1: r = -0.39; group 2: r = -0.36) and percentage of World Health Organization category A motile sperm. In multiple linear regression analysis, concentration and SCSA parameters, but not the time of abstinence, were statistically significant predictors of sperm motility. CONCLUSION(S): There is a moderate correlation between sperm motility and SCSA parameters. The study supports the assumption that both SCSA and motility can be relatively independent predictors of male fertility.
PubMed ID
14667876 View in PubMed
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Dioxin-like activities in serum across European and Inuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169143
Source
Environ Health. 2006;5:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Manhai Long
Birgitte S Andersen
Christian H Lindh
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Marcello Spanò
Gunnar Toft
Henning S Pedersen
Valentyna Zvyezday
Jens Peter Bonde
Eva C Bonefeld-Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Cellular & Molecular Toxicology, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. ml@mil.au.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2006;5:14
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Dioxins - blood - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Europe
Humans
Insecticides - blood
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - blood - metabolism
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - toxicity
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides can cause a series of adverse effects on e.g. reproduction in animals and humans, many of which involve the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The aim of the present study was to compare the integrated serum level of AhR mediated activity among European and Inuit populations, and evaluate whether the activity was associated to the selected POP markers, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE).
The study included 338 males from Greenland (Inuit's), Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine). The AhR transactivity of serum extracts alone (AhRag) and competitive AhR activity (AhRcomp) upon co-exposure with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were determined in the lipophilic serum fraction containing the POPs using the AhR mediated luciferase reporter Hepa1.12cR cell assay.
The European groups showed higher median level of AhR-TEQ (TCDD toxic equivalents) compared to the Inuit's, whereas higher incidence of Inuits sample further induced AhRcomp activity. Neither AhRag nor AhR-TEQ were correlated to CB-153 or p,p'-DDE for any of the study groups. Multiple regressions showed a significant heterogeneity of association between the CB-153 and the AhRcomp across the study groups, and accordingly a negative association between AhRcomp and CB-153 was found for the Kharkiv group.
No consistent correlation between AhR activities and two POP markers was found. Although the difference of AhRag between European and Inuit men could not be explained by CB-153 or p,p'-DDE levels alone, we believe that the variation of AhR serum activity reflects different pattern of POP exposure, genetics and/or life style factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16725033 View in PubMed
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Does smoking during pregnancy affect sons' sperm counts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63500
Source
Epidemiology. 2003 May;14(3):278-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Lone Storgaard
Jens Peter Bonde
Erik Ernst
Marcello Spanô
Claus Yding Andersen
Morten Frydenberg
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. lstor@akh.aaa.dk
Source
Epidemiology. 2003 May;14(3):278-86
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inhibin-beta Subunits - analysis
Male
Obstetric labor, premature
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sperm Count
Twins
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There has been an apparent decline in sperm density during the last 5 decades in Denmark, a country in which women have among the highest rates of smoking in Europe. We examined semen quality and sex hormones in men in relation to their mothers' tobacco smoking during pregnancy. METHODS: Male participants were selected from the population-based Danish Twin Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System as part of a study on hereditary and environmental determinants of semen quality. From November 1999 to May 2000 we collected one fresh semen and blood sample from each of 316 men. Data on prenatal tobacco exposure were obtained for 265 of these men from a questionnaire filled in by their mothers. RESULTS: Adjusting for age, current smoking status and other factors, sperm density was 48% lower(95% confidence interval = -69% to -11) among sons of mothers who smoked more than 10 cigarettes per day during pregnancy. Total sperm counts and levels of inhibin-B were also reduced among this group, whereas follicular stimulating hormone levels were somewhat higher (16% increase; 95% confidence interval = -13% to 54%). These effects were not seen in the lower smoking category (1-10 cigarettes per day). CONCLUSIONS: High levels of smoking (> 10 cigarettes per day) during pregnancy may be a partial explanation for the apparent secular decline and the geographic differences in sperm counts.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2003 May;14(3):261-212859024
PubMed ID
12859027 View in PubMed
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Exposure to PCBs and p,p'-DDE and human sperm chromatin integrity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176348
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Feb;113(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Lars Rylander
Aleksander Giwercman
B A G Jönsson
Christian Lindh
Patrizia Eleuteri
Michele Rescia
Giorgio Leter
Eugenia Cordelli
Marcello Spano
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Anna.Rignell-Hydbom@ymed.lu.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Feb;113(2):175-9
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chromatin - drug effects
DNA Damage
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Lipids - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Spermatozoa - drug effects
Sweden
Abstract
Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), the major metabolite of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), are stable lipophilic compounds widely found in the environment and in the general population. They can enter the food chain, and their negative impact on male reproduction is currently under active scrutiny. To explore the hypothesis that environmental exposure to these compounds is associated with altered sperm chromatin structure integrity in human sperm, we conducted a study of 176 Swedish fishermen (with low and high consumption of fatty fish, a very important exposure source of POPs). We determined serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and p,p'-DDE, and we used the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) to assess sperm DNA/chromatin integrity. When CB-153 serum levels (individual dose range, 39-1,460 ng/g lipid) were categorized into equally sized quintiles, we found an association with the DNA fragmentation index (%DFI). A significantly lower %DFI was found in the lowest CB-153 quintile (
Notes
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PubMed ID
15687046 View in PubMed
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Fertility in four regions spanning large contrasts in serum levels of widespread persistent organochlorines: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4437
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Gunnar Toft
Anna Axmon
Aleksander Giwercman
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Henning Sloth Pedersen
Jan K Ludwicki
Valentina Zvyezday
Andery Zinchuk
Marcello Spano
Gian Carlo Manicardi
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, build, 2C, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. gutof@as.aaa.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:26
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may interfere with reproductive function but direct evidence in humans is very limited. METHODS: Fertility was examined in four regions with contrasting blood levels of POPs. Pregnant women and their partners in Warsaw (Poland), Kharkiv (Ukraine) and Greenland were consecutively enrolled during antenatal visits. Swedish fishermen and their spouses were recruited separately and independently of current pregnancy. Lipid adjusted serum concentrations of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (DDE) were available for both partners. Time to pregnancy interviews were obtained among 2269 women and 798 men provided a semen sample. RESULTS: Inuits had high levels of both POP markers, Swedish fishermen were high in CB-153 but low in DDE, men from Kharkiv were high in DDE and low in CB-153 while men from Warsaw were low in CB-153 and had intermediate DDE levels. Compared to Warsaw couples, fecundability was reduced among couples from Kharkiv [adjusted fecundability ratio (FR) 0.64 (95% CI 0.5-0.8)] and elevated in Swedish fishermen families [FR 1.26 (95% CI 1.0-1.6)]. Adjusted geometric means of sperm counts and morphology did not differ between regions while sperm motility was higher in men living in Warsaw. CONCLUSION: We observed regional differences in time to pregnancy and sperm motility that may be related to regional differences in POP blood levels, but other interpretations are also plausible. In particular, differences in access to safe contraception and in the prevalence of contraceptive failures are most likely to bias comparisons of time to pregnancy.
PubMed ID
16280075 View in PubMed
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Impact of PCB and p,p'-DDE contaminants on human sperm Y:X chromosome ratio: studies in three European populations and the Inuit population in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169426
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 May;114(5):718-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Tarmo Tiido
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Bo A G Jönsson
Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman
Henning S Pedersen
Bogdan Wojtyniak
Jan K Ludwicki
Vladimir Lesovoy
Valentyna Zvyezday
Marcello Spano
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Gunnar Toft
Jens Peter Bonde
Lars Rylander
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Molecular Reproductive Medicine Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Fertility Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. tarmo.tiido@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 May;114(5):718-24
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, X
Chromosomes, Human, Y
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Greenland
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Spermatozoa - drug effects - ultrastructure
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that persistent organohalogen pollutants (POPs) may contribute to sex ratio changes in offspring of exposed populations. Our aim in the present study was to investigate whether exposure to 2,2 ,4,4 ,5,5 -hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p -DDE) affects sperm Y:X chromosome distribution.
We obtained semen and blood for analysis of PCB-153 and p,p -DDE levels from 547 men from Sweden, Greenland, Poland (Warsaw), and Ukraine (Kharkiv), with regionally different levels of POP exposure. The proportion of Y- and X-chromosome-bearing sperm in the semen samples was determined by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.
Swedish and Greenlandic men had on average significantly higher proportions of Y sperm (in both cohorts, 51.2%) and correspondingly higher lipid-adjusted concentrations of PCB-153 (260 ng/g and 350 ng/g, respectively) compared with men from Warsaw (50.3% and 22 ng/g) and Kharkiv (50.7% and 54 ng/g). In the Swedish cohort, log-transformed PCB-153 and log-transformed p,p -DDE variables were significantly positively associated with Y-chromosome fractions (p-values 0.04 and
Notes
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PubMed ID
16675426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inter-population variations in concentrations, determinants of and correlations between 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE): a cross-sectional study of 3161 men and women from Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3408
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Christian Lindh
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Aleksander Giwercman
Gunnar Toft
Henning S Pedersen
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Valentyna Zvyezday
Marcello Spanò
Davide Bizzaro
Eva C Bonefeld-Jörgensen
Gian Carlo Manicardi
Jens Peter Bonde
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. bo_a.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study is part of a collaborative project (Inuendo), aiming to assess the impact of dietary persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) on human fertility. The aims with the present study are to analyze inter-population variations in serum concentrations of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE), to assess inter-population variations in biomarker correlations, and to evaluate the relative impact of different determinants for the inter-individual variations in POP-biomarkers. METHOD: In study populations of 3161 adults, comprising Greenlandic Inuits, Swedish fishermen and their wives, and inhabitants from Warsaw, Poland and Kharkiv, Ukraine, serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The median serum concentrations of CB-153 were for male and female Inuits 200 and 110, for Swedish fishermen 190 and their wives 84, for Kharkiv men and women 44 and 27, and for Warsaw men and women 17 and 11 ng/g lipids, respectively. The median serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE were for Kharkiv men and women 930 and 650, for male and female Inuits 560 and 300, for Warsaw men and women 530 and 380, and for Swedish fishermen 240 and their wives 140 ng/g lipids, respectively. The correlation coefficients between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE varied between 0.19 and 0.92, with the highest correlation among Inuits and the lowest among men from Warsaw. Men had averagely higher serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and there were positive associations between age and the POP-biomarkers, whereas the associations with BMI and smoking were inconsistent. Dietary seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations. CONCLUSION: CB-153 concentrations were much higher in Inuits and Swedish fishermen's populations than in the populations from Eastern Europe, whereas the pattern was different for p,p'-DDE showing highest concentrations in the Kharkiv population. The correlations between the POP-biomarkers varied considerably between the populations, underlining that exposure sources differ and that the choice of representative biomarkers of overall POP exposure has to be based on an analysis of the specific exposure situation for each population. Age and gender were consistent determinants of serum POPs; seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations.
PubMed ID
16283941 View in PubMed
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Semen quality in relation to xenohormone and dioxin-like serum activity among Inuits and three European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159479
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Gunnar Toft
Manhai Long
Tanja Krüger
Philip S Hjelmborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Ewa Tyrkiel
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Marcello Spanó
Davide Bizzaro
Henning S Pedersen
Vladymir Lesovoy
Jan K Ludwicki
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. gutos@as.aaa.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:15-20
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dioxins - blood
Endocrine Disruptors - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Androgen - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Estrogen - drug effects - metabolism
Semen - drug effects
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility - drug effects
Xenobiotics - toxicity
Abstract
Semen quality in humans may be influenced by exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds.
We analyzed associations between semen characteristics and serum xenoestrogen receptor (XER), xenoandrogen receptor (XAR), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivity. XER and XAR activity were measured in serum samples cleared for endogenous steroid hormones and AhR activity in raw lipophilic serum extracts free of proteins.
All together, 319 men from Warsaw (Poland), Greenland, Kharkiv (Ukraine), and Sweden provided semen and blood samples. No strong and consistent associations between xenobiotic activity and semen quality measures were observed in the four populations. However, when the data were combined across populations sperm concentration increased 40% per unit increase in XER activity [95% confidence interval (CI), 1-79%] in the subgroup with XER activity below the reference level. Among subjects with XER activity above the reference level an increase of 14% (95% CI, 2-28%) was found. Furthermore, an increase of 10% motile sperm per unit increase in XER activity below reference level (95% CI, 0.2-20) was found. We are unable to exclude that the associations are chance findings.
Alteration of XER, XAR, or AhR transactivity within the range found in serum from the general European and Inuit population seems not to markedly deteriorate sperm cell concentration, motility, or morphology in adult men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18174945 View in PubMed
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Xenoandrogenic activity in serum differs across European and Inuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159478
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Tanja Krüger
Philip S Hjelmborg
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Marcello Spanò
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Henning S Pedersen
Gunnar Toft
Jens Peter Bonde
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:21-7
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Androgens - blood - toxicity
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Endocrine Disruptors - blood - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Luciferases - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Receptors, Androgen - drug effects - metabolism
Signal Transduction
Abstract
Animal and in vitro studies have indicated that human male reproductive disorders can arise as a result of disrupted androgen receptor (AR) signalling by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our aim in the present study was to compare serum xenoandrogenic activity between study groups with different POP exposures and to evaluate correlations to the POP proxy markers 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE).
We determined xenoandrogenic activity in the serum fraction containing the lipophilic POPs but free of endogenous hormones. Adult male serum (n = 261) from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland), and Kharkiv (Ukraine) was analyzed. Xenoandrogenic activity was determined as the effect of serum extract alone (XAR) and in the presence of the synthetic AR agonist R1881 (XARcomp) on AR transactivated luciferase activity.
The study groups differed significantly with respect to XARcomp activity, which was increased in the Inuits and decreased in the European study groups; we observed no difference for XAR activity. We found the highest level of the AR antagonist p,p'-DDE in Kharkiv, and accordingly, this study group showed the highest percent of serum samples with decreased XARcomp activities. Furthermore, the percentage of serum samples with decreased XARcomp activities followed the p,p'-DDE serum level for the European study groups. No correlations between serum XAR or XARcomp activities and the two POP markers were revealed.
The differences in XARcomp serum activity between the study groups suggest differences in chemical exposure profiles, genetics, and/or lifestyle factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18174946 View in PubMed
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Xenobiotic activity in serum and sperm chromatin integrity in European and inuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159850
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2008 Apr;75(4):669-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tanja Krüger
Marcello Spanò
Manhai Long
Patrizia Eleuteri
Michele Rescia
Philip S Hjelmborg
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Alexander Giwercman
Gunnar Toft
Jens Peter Bonde
Eva C Bonefeld-Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Unit of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2008 Apr;75(4):669-80
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatin - chemistry - drug effects - metabolism
Cohort Studies
DNA Fragmentation - drug effects
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Receptors, Androgen - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, Estrogen - genetics - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Spermatozoa - chemistry - drug effects - metabolism
Xenobiotics - blood - toxicity
Abstract
Lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and suspected to interfere with hormone activities and reproduction. In previous studies we demonstrated that POP exposure can affect sperm DNA integrity and differences between Inuits and Europeans in sperm DNA integrity and xenobiotic activity were observed. The aim of this study was to investigate possible relations between human sperm chromatin integrity and the xenobiotic serum activity of lipophilic POPs assessed as effects on the estrogen (ER), androgen (AR), and/or aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) receptors. Human sperm chromatin integrity was assessed as DNA fragmentation index (%DFI) and high DNA stainability (%HDS) using the flow cytometric sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Xenobiotic receptor activities were determined using chemically activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) assay. The study included 53 Greenlandic Inuits and 247 Europeans (Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine)). A heterogeneous pattern of correlations was found. For Inuits, ER and AhR activities and %DFI were inversely correlated, whereas a positive correlation between AR activity and %DFI was found for Europeans. In contrast, no correlation between receptor activities and %HDS was observed for Inuits but for Europeans positive and negative correlations were observed between ER and AR activities and %HDS, respectively. We suggest that the different patterns of xenobiotic serum activities, in combination with diet associated factors and/or genetics, might be connected to the observed differences in sperm chromatin integrity between the Inuits and Europeans.
PubMed ID
18076054 View in PubMed
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