Impact of light regimes on productivity patterns of benthic microbial mats in an antarctic lake: a modeling study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95951
Source
Limnol Oceanogr. 1997 Nov;42(7):1561-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
Moorhead D L
Wolf C F
Wharton R A
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock 79409-3131, USA.
Source
Limnol Oceanogr. 1997 Nov;42(7):1561-9
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Cold Climate
Cyanobacteria - metabolism - radiation effects
Fresh Water - microbiology
Ice
Light
Models, Biological
Photosynthesis - radiation effects
Phytoplankton - metabolism - radiation effects
Snow
Sunlight
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Filamentous cyanobacteria often dominate benthic microbial communities of antarctic lakes and usually exhibit saturation of photosynthesis at light intensities approximately 100 microEinst m-2 s-1. Incident light regimes are controlled by ice and snow accumulations overlaying water columns during much of the year. Thus, light availability to microbial mats is often below saturation intensity and is strongly influenced by modest changes in climatic factors. A model of net primary production for benthic mat communities of the subantarctic Sombre Lake, Signy Island, was developed (1) to evaluate depth-specific productivities of mat communities, (2) to test the relative importances of model parameters to mat production, and (3) to explore the potential impacts of climate change on mat production as manifested through changes in light regime. Simulated rates of net primary production corresponded to observations on a daily basis (approximately 1-4 micrograms C fixed mg-1 ash-free DW of mat d-1) but were an order of magnitude lower than estimates of net annual production based on field measurements (
PubMed ID
11541255 View in PubMed
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