Personality traits in relation to alcohol dependence and abuse and psychiatric comorbidity among women: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9371
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2004 Jul;39(9):1301-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Anette Ostlund
Fredrik Spak
Valter Sundh
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. anette.ostlund@socmed.gu.se
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2004 Jul;39(9):1301-18
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Personal Satisfaction
Personality Inventory
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
This study investigates relationships between personality traits, alcohol dependence and abuse (ADA), and psychiatric comorbidity in a general population sample of women. The study is based on data from a previous study by this group titled "Women and Alcohol in Göteborg." Altogether, 316 women were interviewed. Personality traits were assessed with the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses given according to The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Revised Edition (DSM-III-R). Compared with the reference group, women with a lifetime diagnoses of ADA were more anxious, tense, socially conformist, impulsive, and irritable. They were also more easily fatigued, and less satisfied with their present life situation and childhood experiences. This was more marked among women with current ADA than in women with resolved ADA. Women with other psychiatric diagnoses resembled women with ADA, according to the KSP. The results indicate that personality interacts with all diagnoses included, and possibly influences the development of ADA.
PubMed ID
15462231 View in PubMed
Less detail