Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of fetal death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92909
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Jul;22(4):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Jellesen Rikke
Strandberg-Larsen Katrine
Jørgensen Tina
Olsen Jørn
Thulstrup Ane M
Andersen Anne-Marie N
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oster Farimagsgade 5A, DK-1399 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Jul;22(4):334-40
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Intrauterine exposure to artificial sex hormones such as oral contraceptives may be associated with an increased risk of fetal death. Between 1996 and 2002, a total of 92 719 women were recruited to The Danish National Birth Cohort and interviewed about exposures during pregnancy. Outcome of pregnancy was identified through linkage to the Civil Registration System and the National Discharge Registry. The authors analysed the risk of fetal death after recruitment to the cohort by using proportional hazards regression models with gestational age as the underlying time scale. In total, 1102 (1.2%) women took oral contraceptives during pregnancy. Use of combined oestrogen and progesterone oral contraceptives (COC) or progesterone-only oral contraceptives (POC) during pregnancy was not associated with increased hazard ratios of fetal death compared with non-users, HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.71, 1.45] and HR 1.37 [95% CI 0.65, 2.89] respectively. Neither use of COC nor POC prior to pregnancy was associated with fetal death. Stratification by maternal age and smoking showed elevated risks of fetal death for women
PubMed ID
18578746 View in PubMed
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