Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Sep;28(3):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Lindell Bo
Sowby David
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2008 Sep;28(3):277-82
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental pollution
Humans
International Cooperation
Organizations, Nonprofit
Radiation Effects
Radiation Protection
United Nations
Abstract
In the mid-1950s, concern was increasing about the possible effects from the radioactive fallout resulting from nuclear weapon testing. Various scientists from non-nuclear countries such as Sweden and Canada made their politicians aware of the potential hazards of fallout. This concern went up to the General Assembly of the United Nations, which took the unique step of appointing a scientific committee to advise it about the levels and effects of radiation, especially from nuclear bomb testing. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was established in 1955 and held its first working meeting in September 1956. In less than two years it produced its first, pioneering report, which produced previously secret information about fallout exposure, and hitherto unknown information about natural background and medical exposure.
PubMed ID
18714141 View in PubMed
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