Self-rated health showed a consistent association with serum HDL-cholesterol in the cross-sectional Oslo Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84966
Source
Int J Med Sci. 2007;4(5):278-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tomten Sissel E
Høstmark Arne T
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Sport, Physical Education, Box 4014 Ullevål Hageby, 0806 Oslo, Norway. sissel.tomten@nih.no
Source
Int J Med Sci. 2007;4(5):278-87
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Height
Body Weight
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Self Concept
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between serum HDL-cholesterol concentration (HDL-C) and self rated health (SRH) in several age groups of men and women. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a cross-sectional design and included 18,770 men and women of the Oslo Health Study aged 30; 40 and 45; 69-60; 75-76 years. RESULTS: In both sexes and all age groups, SRH (3 categories: poor, good, very good) was positively correlated with HDL-C. Logistic regression analysis on dichotomized values of SRH (i.e. poor vs. good health) in each age group of men and women showed that increasing HDL-C values were associated with increasing odds for reporting good health; the odds ratio (OR) was highest in young men, and was generally lower in women than in men. Odds ratios in the 4 age groups of men were 4.94 (2.63-9.29), 2.25 (1.63-3.09), 2.12 (1.58-2.86), 1.87 (1.37-2.54); and in women: 3.58 (2.46-5.21), 2.81 (2.23-3.53), 2.28 (1.84-2.82), 1.61 (1.31-1.99). In the whole material, 1 mmol/L increase in HDL-C increased the odds for reporting good health by 2.27 (2.06-2.50; p
PubMed ID
18071582 View in PubMed
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