The potential impact of cancer survivors on Native American cancer prevention and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4034
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1578-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
J S Kaur
Author Affiliation
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1578-81
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality - psychology - therapy
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer has recently become a major health problem for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data showed that Native American survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years from cancer diagnosis are the poorest of any minority population studied. The causes for this finding are multifactorial and include a lack of awareness of cancer risks and symptoms, fatalism, and lack of access to screening services. Cancer survivors in native communities can be invaluable resources to educate others, raise cancer awareness, and most importantly prove that cancer is not always fatal.
PubMed ID
8839574 View in PubMed
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