Indigenous perspectives on wellness and health in Canada: study protocol for a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305084
Source
Syst Rev. 2020 08 11; 9(1):177
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-11-2020
Author
K Thiessen
M Haworth-Brockman
R Stout
P Moffitt
J Gelowitz
J Schneider
L Demczuk
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 89 Curry Place, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2, Canada. Kellie.thiessen@umanitoba.ca.
Source
Syst Rev. 2020 08 11; 9(1):177
Date
08-11-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Indigenous communities are often portrayed from a deficit-based lens; however, Indigenous communities have self-determined perspectives of health and well-being that are strength based. The objective of this study will be to systematically map the literature on perspectives, concepts, and constructs of wellness and well-being in Indigenous communities in Canada.
A scoping review protocol was designed following the Arksey and O'Malley framework. We will search the following electronic databases (from inception onwards): MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Anthropology Plus, Bibliography of Native North Americans, Canadian Business and Current Affairs, and Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database. Grey literature will be identified through searching dissertation databases, Google Scholar, and conference abstracts. We will include all types of literature in English, published and unpublished, including any study design, reviews and meta-analyses, dissertations, reports, and books. The literature considered should describe or reflect Indigenous perspectives that identify concepts or constructs related to well-being or wellness; literature can be from any setting in Canada. Two reviewers will independently screen all citations, full-text reports, and abstract data. Data analysis will involve quantitative descriptions (e.g. frequencies) and qualitative content analysis methods.
This review will provide a synthesis of the literature on Indigenous perspectives, concepts, and constructs of wellness and well-being in Canada. We anticipate the study will contribute to improve our understanding of how Indigenous communities conceptualize and embody wellness. Our findings will provide a basis for engaging Indigenous stakeholders in future health research and informing future interpretations of how wellness is conceptualized, whether written or unwritten.
PubMed ID
32782011 View in PubMed
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