Tracking pressure injuries as adverse events: National use of the Global Trigger Tool over a 4-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299632
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2019 Feb; 25(1):21-27
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Lena Gunningberg
Eva Sving
Ami Hommel
Carina Ålenius
Per Wiger
Carina Bååth
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2019 Feb; 25(1):21-27
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals - classification - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Safety - standards
Pressure Ulcer - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Risk Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the frequency, preventability, and consequences of hospital acquired pressure injuries in acute care hospitals over a 4-year period.
A retrospective record review was performed using the Swedish version of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). A total of 64 917 hospital admissions were reviewed. Data were collected between 2013 and 2016 from all 63 Swedish acute care hospitals.
The prevalence of pressure injuries (category 2-4) was 1%. Older patients, "satellite patients", and patients with acute admissions had more pressure injuries. Most pressure injuries (91%) were determined to be preventable. The mean extended length of hospital stay was 15.8 days for patients who developed pressure injuries during hospitalization.
The GTT provides a useful and complementary national perspective on hospital acquired pressure injuries across hospitals, informing health care providers on safety priorities to reduce patient harm. Clinical leaders can use information on the preventability and the consequences of pressure injuries, as well as evidence-based arguments for improving the health care organization.
PubMed ID
30027549 View in PubMed
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