Field Evaluation and In-Situ Stress-Testing of the Organic-Diffusive Gradients in Thin-Films Passive Sampler.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295125
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2018 Sep 24; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-24-2018
Author
Jonathan K Challis
Kevin Stroski
Kim Luong
Mark L Hanson
Charles S Wong
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2018 Sep 24; :
Date
Sep-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The organic-diffusive gradients in thin-films (o-DGT) technique has emerged as a promising aquatic passive sampler that addresses many of the challenges associated with current sampling tools used for measurement of polar organic contaminants. This study represents the first comprehensive field evaluation of the o-DGT in natural surface waters, across a wide suite of polar pharmaceuticals and pesticides. We explore the utility and limitations of o-DGT as a quantitative measurement tool compared to grab sampling and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) across four connected agricultural and wastewater-influenced freshwater systems spanning 600 km from the U.S. border to northern Manitoba, Canada. Overall, the suite of analytes detected with o-DGT and POCIS were similar. Concentrations in water estimated using o-DGT were greater than concentrations estimated from POCIS in 71 of 80 paired observations, and on average, the estimates from o-DGT were 2.3-fold higher than estimates from POCIS. Grab sample concentrations suggested that the systematic underestimation with POCIS were largely a result of sampling rate variation related to flow-rate and boundary-layer effects, an issue reported consistently in the POCIS literature. These comprehensive measurements in an agriculturally-influenced fast-flowing river, long-term sampling (>40 days) in a large dilute lake system, deployments in wastewaters, and under-ice at near-freezing temperatures represent effective stress-testing of o-DGT under representative and challenging conditions. Overall, its strong performance and improved accuracy over POCIS supports its use as a robust, quantitative, and sensitive measurement tool for polar organic chemicals in aquatic systems.
PubMed ID
30244575 View in PubMed
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