Mental Disorders in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adult Outpatients: A Comparison of Linguistic Subgroups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289655
Source
J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2017 Jan; 22(1):105-117
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Beate Øhre
Maj Volden
Erik Falkum
Stephen von Tetzchner
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital.
Source
J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2017 Jan; 22(1):105-117
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Deafness - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Linguistics
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology
Sign Language
Speech - physiology
Abstract
Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) individuals who use signed language and those who use spoken language face different challenges and stressors. Accordingly, the profile of their mental problems may also differ. However, studies of mental disorders in this population have seldom differentiated between linguistic groups. Our study compares demographics, mental disorders, and levels of distress and functioning in 40 patients using Norwegian Sign Language (NSL) and 36 patients using spoken language. Assessment instruments were translated into NSL. More signers were deaf than hard of hearing, did not share a common language with their childhood caregivers, and had attended schools for DHH children. More Norwegian-speaking than signing patients reported medical comorbidity, whereas the distribution of mental disorders, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and daily functioning did not differ significantly. Somatic complaints and greater perceived social isolation indicate higher stress levels in DHH patients using spoken language than in those using sign language. Therefore, preventive interventions are necessary, as well as larger epidemiological and clinical studies concerning the mental health of all language groups within the DHH population.
PubMed ID
28028042 View in PubMed
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