Quantity and/or Quality? The Importance of Publishing Many Papers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283670
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166149
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ulf Sandström
Peter van den Besselaar
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166149
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Databases, Bibliographic
Publications
Research Personnel
Sweden
Abstract
Do highly productive researchers have significantly higher probability to produce top cited papers? Or do high productive researchers mainly produce a sea of irrelevant papers-in other words do we find a diminishing marginal result from productivity? The answer on these questions is important, as it may help to answer the question of whether the increased competition and increased use of indicators for research evaluation and accountability focus has perverse effects or not. We use a Swedish author disambiguated dataset consisting of 48.000 researchers and their WoS-publications during the period of 2008-2011 with citations until 2014 to investigate the relation between productivity and production of highly cited papers. As the analysis shows, quantity does make a difference.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27870854 View in PubMed
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