Physiological effects of work stress and pesticide exposure in tree planting by British Columbia silviculture workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220570
Source
Ergonomics. 1993 Aug;36(8):951-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
D G Robinson
D G Trites
E W Banister
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada.
Source
Ergonomics. 1993 Aug;36(8):951-61
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholinesterase - blood - drug effects
Adult
British Columbia
Creatine Kinase - blood
Female
Forestry
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - blood - enzymology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pesticides - adverse effects
Stress, Physiological - blood - complications
Abstract
Tree planters in British Columbia have reported symptoms that are congruent with musculoskeletal stress and organophosphate or carbamate pesticide intoxication. The purpose of this research was to determine the existence of any physiological or biochemical correlate supporting the existence of these potential hazards in tree planting. Worker's health complaints were assessed from regularly distributed questionnaires. Blood samples were obtained from 14 male and three female Canadian subjects before and after tree planting work on 10 occasions throughout a tree planting season. The strenuous physical challenge of tree planting was confirmed by a significant elevation of serum enzyme activity (ESEA) at the beginning of the season, which did not return to a normal level during the remainder of the season. Significant (p
PubMed ID
8365393 View in PubMed
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