Work stress, job satisfaction and emotional well-being among Canadian dental assistants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212295
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;24(2):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;24(2):133-7
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Dental Assistants - psychology
Depression - etiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Income
Job Satisfaction
Linear Models
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
Although dentistry is considered to be a stressful occupation, few data exist on work stress among dental assistants. In a previous paper, the extent and nature of work stress among this group was described and linked to a behavioural outcome; namely, intentions to change jobs or seek work outside of dentistry. In this paper the psychological outcomes of work stress, in the form of job satisfaction and emotional well-being, are examined. Using data collected by a mail survey, it was revealed that the main sources of dissatisfaction for dental assistants were low incomes, lack of opportunity to develop professionally and lack of recognition. Almost one-in-five had scores on a standard measure of emotional distress, which indicated a cause for concern. Work stress proved to be a significant predictor of job satisfaction, and work stress and job satisfaction emerged as significant predictors of emotional well-being. Social support while at work showed direct and interactive effects on job satisfaction but not emotional well-being. Role ambiguity, under-utilization of skills and low self-esteem emerged as important issues. These results are of interest theoretically and have important implications for the way dental practice and dentistry are organized.
PubMed ID
8654035 View in PubMed
Less detail