Smoking cessation between teenage years and adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195366
Source
Health Educ Res. 2001 Feb;16(1):49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
M. Paavola
E. Vartiainen
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Health Educ Res. 2001 Feb;16(1):49-57
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Most smokers begin smoking in adolescence. It is less well known how young people quit smoking and the factors that are associated with this process. A 15-year follow-up study on the North Karelia Youth Project has made it possible to assess these factors using a longitudinal study design. The project began in 1978 with students in Grade 7 of junior high school (age 13 years) and concluded in 1980 when the students reached Grade 9 (age 15 years). The follow-up study included four additional surveys. The present analyses are based on the data collected at ages 15, 21 and 28. The original sample comprised 903 students and the response rate of the last survey was 71%. A quarter (26%) of daily smokers and about half (46%) of occasional smokers at age of 15 had quit by the age of 28. The cessation rate was higher among females than males (P = 0.006). The cessation rate was higher among married (P = 0.015), employed (P = 0.01) and white-collar workers (P = 0.006). Cessation was less prevalent among those who had friends (P
PubMed ID
11252283 View in PubMed
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