Demographic and situational factors affecting injury, resistance, completion, and charges brought in sexual assault cases: what is best for arrest?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176071
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):479-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Hannah S Scott
Rebecca Beaman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Ontario, Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. Hannah.scott@uoit.ca
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):479-94
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rape - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examines demographic and situational factors in an effort to predict whether or not a complainant was injured, used resistance, experienced a completed assault, and whether charges were brought against the offender. If the accused had consumed alcohol or drugs, he was almost seven times more likely to be arrested. The complainant was six times more likely to report rape completion if she had consumed alcohol or drugs and if the complainant fell unconscious at any time during the attack she was significantly less likely to use a resistance strategy. The complainant's use of a compliance strategy at any time during the assault positively predicted not using a physical resistance strategy and sexual assault completion. The reporting of injury positively predicted use a physical resistance strategy and sexual assault completion. If the assault was completed, it was less likely that charges were pressed. Implications of these findings are discussed, and directions for future research are offered.
PubMed ID
15726940 View in PubMed
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