Strategies and goals of community-based injury prevention programmes--a mixed-methods study of 25 Scandinavian WHO Safe Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170262
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Per Nilsen
Diana Hudson
Felicia Gabrielsson
Kent Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Health and Society, Div. of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Linköping University, SE 581-83 Linköping, Sweden. nilsen@uptown.se
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-33
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Goals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Scandinavia
World Health Organization
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
Documentation and analysis of prevention goals and interventions employed by community-based injury prevention programmes is vital to advance the knowledge and understanding of synergistic multi-strategy injury prevention programmes. This study examined the goals and interventions of 25 Scandinavian community-based injury prevention programmes in WHO-designated Safe Communities. Collection and analysis of quantitative data from survey questionnaires to the programme coordinators was followed by collection and analysis of qualitative data from structured interviews with programme coordinators from eight of the programmes. The results demonstrated that the programmes under study predominantly relied on "intuitive" and subjective methods for selecting interventions. The programmes largely failed to transform injury surveillance data into information and knowledge that could prioritize community safety strategies and measures, due to insufficient time and personnel resources. The results demonstrated the importance of combining passive approaches with active interventions. Educational efforts were considered essential to the programmes. The programmes preferred to rely on broadly stated goals rather than specific objectives.
PubMed ID
16537221 View in PubMed
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