Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164012
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary (AB) Canada T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Episode of Care
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Syndrome
Abstract
Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items.
A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes.
Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders.
Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.
PubMed ID
17450450 View in PubMed
Less detail