A change from subcutaneous to intravenous erythropoietin increases the cost of anemia therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161154
Source
Nephron Clin Pract. 2007;107(3):c90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Philip A McFarlane
Michael P Hillmer
Niki Dacouris
Author Affiliation
Home Dialysis, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. phil.mcfarlane@utoronto.ca
Source
Nephron Clin Pract. 2007;107(3):c90-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anemia - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Erythropoietin - administration & dosage - economics
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injections, Intravenous - economics - statistics & numerical data
Injections, Subcutaneous - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
It seems that more erythropoietin (EPO) is required when given intravenously (IV) than when given subcutaneously (SC). Estimates of the magnitude of this difference vary widely, impeding development of economic models in this area. Concerns about pure red cell aplasia led our program to switch from SC to IV EPO, so we studied the impact of this change on the cost of anemia therapy.
All in-center hemodialysis patients who had received EPO for at least 3 months prior to and following conversion to IV EPO were studied. Data was obtained retrospectively for 1 year prior to and prospectively for 1 year following conversion. The costs of anemia therapy (EPO, transfusions and iron) were calculated from the hospital's perspective.
158 patients were studied. One month after switching, the hemoglobin fell significantly, reaching a nadir at 3 months. This triggered more use of EPO, iron and transfusions. By month 7 hemoglobin levels had returned to initial levels, with a median rise in EPO dose of 1,250 units/week (p
PubMed ID
17890876 View in PubMed
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