Compressing "the sandwiched": an examination of reductionist health policies on women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154967
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Nov-Dec;29(10):980-96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dominika A Jegen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jegen@ucalgary.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Nov-Dec;29(10):980-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - trends
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - trends
Female
Government Regulation
Health Care Reform - trends
Health Policy - trends
Home Nursing - trends
Humans
Sociology, Medical
Women
Women's health
Abstract
Worldwide, policymakers are critically examining the escalating costs of health care. One proposed solution has been to move away from a centralized "general hospital"-type of treatment in favor of a family-based model emphasizing health as well as treatment. While I agree that such approaches constitute an innovative outlook on health care, I draw on a social ecological approach in order to attract attention to and lay out the argument for future research examining the unacknowledged and unstudied impact that such proposed policies will have on women. Undoubtedly, it is they who will bear the brunt of the proposed health-related responsibilities offloaded by governments. I examine the implications of such proposed policies on Canadians, particularly Canadian women, although the Canadian system is but an exemplar of the changing dynamics of caregiving in a broader world situation.
Notes
Retraction In: Health Care Women Int. 2009 Jan-Feb;30(1-2):119116816
PubMed ID
18821210 View in PubMed
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