Pain management in post-craniotomy patients: a survey of canadian neurosurgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135030
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2011 May;38(3):456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Basil Hassouneh
John E Centofanti
Kesava Reddy
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2011 May;38(3):456-60
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Craniotomy - adverse effects
Health Surveys
Humans
Pain Measurement - methods
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - therapy
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Despite the growing recognition for analgesic needs in post-craniotomy patients, this remains a poorly studied area in neurological surgery. The class and regimen of analgesia that is most suitable for these patients remains controversial. The objective of this study is to examine the current beliefs and practices of Canadian neurosurgeons when managing post-craniotomy pain.
A survey was sent to all practicing Canadian neurosurgeons to examine the following aspects of analgesia in craniotomy patients: type of analgesics used, common side effects encountered, satisfaction with current regimen and the rationale for their practice.
Of 156 potential respondents, 103 neurosurgeons (66%) completed the survey. Codeine (59%) was the most prescribed first line analgesic followed by morphine (38%). The use of a second-line opioid was significantly higher among codeine prescribers compared to morphine, 53% compared to 28% (p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 2011 May;38(3):390-121515493
PubMed ID
21515506 View in PubMed
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