International immigration, internal migration, and homicide in Canadian provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125946
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2013 May;57(5):632-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Martin A Andresen
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. andresen@sfu.ca
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2013 May;57(5):632-57
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Male
Models, Statistical
Abstract
The relationship between immigration and crime is politically charged and often fueled by the presence (or lack) of xenophobia. Many theoretical and empirical assessments of this relationship indicate that immigration does indeed lead to increased crime, but more recent (and very early) research investigating homicide calls this finding into question. The current analysis investigates the relationship between immigration and homicide using multiple measures of migration and Canadian provinces as the unit of analysis. It is found that the link between immigration and homicide is complex and dependent on the measure of migration used. Generally speaking, the results presented here are consistent with the more recent and very early research. Immigration, in and of itself, does not increase homicide. Rather it is the increase in the most criminogenic subpopulation that matters, that is young males.
PubMed ID
22436732 View in PubMed
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