Twenty-four-hour mobility during acute hospitalization in older medical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120753
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Mar;68(3):331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Mette Merete Pedersen
Ann Christine Bodilsen
Janne Petersen
Nina Beyer
Ove Andersen
Louise Lawson-Smith
Henrik Kehlet
Thomas Bandholm
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre (136), Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. mette.merete.pedersen@hvh.regionh.dk
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Mar;68(3):331-7
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Bed Rest - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Prospective Studies
Walking
Abstract
Inactivity during hospitalization in older medical patients may lead to functional decline. This study quantified 24-hour mobility, validated the accelerometers used, and assessed the daily level of basic mobility in acutely admitted older medical patients during their hospitalization.
This is a prospective cohort study in older medical patients able to walk independently (ambulatory patients) and those not able to walk independently (nonambulatory patients) on admission. The 24-hour mobility level during hospitalization was assessed by measuring the time in lying, sitting, and standing and/or walking, by two accelerometers. Basic mobility was quantified within 48 hours of admission and repeated daily throughout hospitalization.
Forty-three ambulatory patients and six nonambulatory patients were included. The ambulatory patients tended to be hospitalized for fewer days than the nonambulatory patients (7 vs 16, p = .13). The ambulatory patients were lying median 17 hours, (interquartile range [IQR]: 14.4-19.1), sitting 5.1 hours (IQR: 2.9-7.1), and standing and/or walking 1.1 hours (IQR: 0.6-1.7) per day. On days with independency in basic mobility, the ambulatory patients were lying 4.1 hours less compared with days with dependency in basic mobility (p
PubMed ID
22972940 View in PubMed
Less detail