Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120412
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Mar 1;39(2):170-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Berndt Karlsson
Torbjörn Akerstedt
Eleonor I Fransson
Peter Westerholm
Hugo Westerlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Mar 1;39(2):170-7
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer.
The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk.
In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women
PubMed ID
23007867 View in PubMed
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