The impact of harm reduction on HIV and illicit drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104926
Source
Harm Reduct J. 2014;11:7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lianping Ti
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St, Paul's Hospital, 608 - 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6, Canada. uhri-tk@cfenet.ubc.ca.
Source
Harm Reduct J. 2014;11:7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Humans
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
There has been widespread support for harm reduction programs as an essential component for responding to the HIV and illicit drug use epidemics. However, despite the growing international acceptance of harm reduction, there continues to be strong opposition to this approach, with critics alleging that harm reduction programs enable drug use. Vancouver, Canada provides a compelling case study that demonstrates that many positive impacts of harm reduction can be attained while addiction treatment-related goals are simultaneously supported. While the evidence for harm reduction is clearly mounting, it is unfortunate that ideological and political barriers to implementing harm reduction programs in Canada remain. As evidenced by Vancouver and elsewhere, harm reduction programs do not exacerbate drug use and undermine treatment efforts and should thereby occupy a well-deserved space within the continuum of programs and services offered to people who inject drugs.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Jan;24(1):46-5122883543
Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2009 Mar;20(2):188-9118571396
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Mar;8(3):142-318291331
PubMed ID
24559062 View in PubMed
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