Investigating the psychological impact of bank robbery: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104298
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2014 Jun;28(5):454-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Maj Hansen
Cherie Armour
Mark Shevlin
Ask Elklit
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Psychotraumatology, Institute for Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, Odense M, Odense 5230, Denmark. Electronic address: mhansen@health.sdu.dk.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2014 Jun;28(5):454-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Theft - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
Despite numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research in the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is sparse and characterized by several limitations. To overcome these limitations we investigated the psychological impact of bank robbery in a cohort study by comparing general levels of traumatization and somatization in employees never exposed to robbery and employees exposed to robbery at different degrees and time-points, while controlling for selected risk factors of posttraumatic distress. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only the acute directly exposed robbery group which had a significantly higher score on general traumatization and somatization compared to the control group whilst controlling for other factors. In conclusion, bank robbery exposure appears to be especially associated with psychological distress in the acute phase and in victims present during the robbery. After the acute phase, other factors appear more important in predicting general traumatization and somatization in bank employees compared to exposure to robbery.
PubMed ID
24846493 View in PubMed
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