Contemporary use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): A Norwegian prospective, multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101652
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1144-1151
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Tom Glomsaker
Kjetil Søreide
Geir Hoff
Lars Aabakken
Jon Arne Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery , Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger , Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1144-1151
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Novel imaging modalities have supplanted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the diagnosis of hepatobiliary pancreatic diseases, but the use of ERCP as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in current clinical practice is not well known. The main objective of this study was to describe and evaluate contemporary use of ERCP in Norway. Material and methods. Prospective and consecutive data were collected between January 2007 and December 2009 from voluntary institutional reports of ERCP activity at participating hospitals in the Gastronet database. Results. A total of 3840 procedures at 14 hospitals were registered during the study period. Data from 3809 procedures (53% females) were available for evaluation. Patients were =60 years of age in 2567 (67%) procedures. High co-morbidity (ASA score =3) was present in 32% of patients. The main indication for ERCP was evaluation and therapy of bile duct-related disorders. Successful bile duct cannulation was achieved in 93%. Pre-cut sphincterotomy was performed in 5% of procedures, and a guide wire to facilitate duct access was employed in 63%. Sphincterotomy, treatment for common bile duct stones (CBDS), and an insertion or change of bile duct stents were the most commonly employed procedures. Complications occurred in 10% of the patients, with a procedure-related mortality of 1%. Conclusions. In Norway, ERCP is predominantly performed for CBDS and biliary strictures in elderly patients with associated co-morbidity. Patient selection, indications, and procedures are in concert with international guidelines and recommendations. Disease patterns in Norway differ slightly from those observed in central Europe and North America.
PubMed ID
21692712 View in PubMed
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