Symboldrama, a psychotherapeutic method for adolescents with dissociative and PTSD symptoms: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100543
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2010 Jul;11(3):308-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Doris Nilsson
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
BUP-Elefanten, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden. doris.nilsson@liu.se
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2010 Jul;11(3):308-21
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Fantasy
Female
Humans
Hypnosis - methods
Imagery (Psychotherapy) - methods
Life Change Events
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
A total of 15 clinically referred adolescents who had been sexually or physically abused participated in this pilot study of the use of symboldrama psychotherapy. Symboldrama is a psychotherapeutic method that uses imagery as the major psychotherapeutic tool. All adolescents reported to be suffering from a high level of dissociative symptoms and other symptoms such as anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and anger after their traumas. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that symboldrama psychotherapy in addition to psycho-education of the non-offending parent would significantly reduce the reported symptoms. Before treatment, the participants answered three questionnaires: (a) the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events Scale, (b) the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children, and (c) the Dissociation Questionnaire-Swedish version. After treatment, the participants once again filled out the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children and the Dissociation Questionnaire-Swedish version. The scores from before and after treatment were compared, and the results showed that the symptoms had been statistically significantly reduced.
PubMed ID
20603765 View in PubMed
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