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The use of medicinal plants by the Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature863
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1988 Nov-Dec;30(6):189-226
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
Fortuine, R.
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1988 Nov-Dec;30(6):189-226
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Medicinal plants
Traditional healer
Empirical healing
Research needs
Alaska
Algae
Fungi
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Plants, Medicinal
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 248.
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Ritual changes in the dentition among the Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270
Source
Quintessence International. 4(1011):103-106.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1974
Author
Bergemann, H.
Source
Quintessence International. 4(1011):103-106.
Date
Apr-1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Traditional surgery
Dental mutilation
Mummies
Dental occlusal wear
Dental extraction
Culture
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Tooth Extraction
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 128.
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Medicine in primitive Indian and Eskimo art.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature990
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1970 Mar 14;102(5):513-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-1970
Author
Gunn, S.W.
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1970 Mar 14;102(5):513-4
Date
Mar-14-1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Shamanic healing
Canada
Exhibits
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
History, Modern 1601-
Indians, North American
Inuits
Medicine in Art - history
Medicine, Traditional - history
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 254.
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Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):19-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
Polk, S
Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):19-20
Date
1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcohol abuse
Allied Health Personnel
Bethel
Child
Drug abuse
Health services
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mental health services
Suicide
Traditional healing
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1604.
PubMed ID
3677852 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native youth. A new approach to serving emotionally disturbed children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2566
Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):15-18.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
VanDenBerg, J.
Minton, B.A.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):15-18.
Date
1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Native self-determination
Cultural determinants of health
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Mental health services
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2324.
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Alaska Native 'grass roots' movement: problem solving utilizing indigenous values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1539
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1985; 40:84-91.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Mala, T.A.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1985; 40:84-91.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Drug abuse
Community health aides
Traditional healing
Acculturation
Alaska
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Inuits
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1593.
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Mental health services for American Indians and Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2488
Source
Community Mental Health Journal. 1970 Dec; 6(6):455-463.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
Torrey, E.F.
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Institutes of Health
Source
Community Mental Health Journal. 1970 Dec; 6(6):455-463.
Date
1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Health services
Acculturation
Traditional healing
Community mental health workers
Community Health Workers - education - utilization
Folklore
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Mental Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Psychotherapy - manpower
Psychotherapy, Group
Superstitions
United States
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2321.
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Transformative and restorative processes: revisiting the question of efficacy of indigenous healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114979
Source
Med Anthropol. 2013;32(3):191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
James B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. j.waldram@usask.ca
Source
Med Anthropol. 2013;32(3):191-207
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Medical
Belize
Canada
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, Central American
Indians, North American
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Abstract
Studies of the efficacy of 'traditional' Indigenous healing often fail to consider the epistemologies that underlay specific healing traditions, especially intrinsic notions of efficacy. In this article, I critically engage the concept of efficacy by identifying two somewhat different approaches to the issue of outcome. In 'transformative' healing processes, healing is conceptualized as a journey in which the outcome goal is a transformed individual. Efficacy, then, is about incremental changes toward this goal. In 'restorative' healing processes, the goal is termination of the sickness and the restoration of health; efficacy is conceptualized as a return to a presickness state. These healing processes are illustrated with examples from the Q'eqchi Maya of Belize and Aboriginal peoples of Canada.
PubMed ID
23557005 View in PubMed
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Portrait of an Eskimo tribal health doctor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4658
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Nov;21(6):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
S. Juul
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Nov;21(6):66-71
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Female
Health Services - history
Health Services, Indigenous - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Male
Pregnancy
Noatak
Empirical healing
Massage
Medicinal plants
Blood-letting
Keats, Della
Traditional surgery
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 755.
PubMed ID
397781 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska Medicine. 1982 Nov-Dec;24(6):101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
S. Kirchner
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1982 Nov-Dec;24(6):101-5
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Community Health Services
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
SelawikSkin, Sr., Andrew
Manipulation
Medicinal plants
Empirical healing
Dislocation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 756.
PubMed ID
6763481 View in PubMed
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Health aspects of Arctic exploration--Alaska's medical history based on the research files of Dr. Robert Fortuine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107886
Source
Pages 871-875 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):871-875
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
healthcare of the Native population, Dr. I 1ortuine \Vent back to a topic he returned to again and again --- the value and use of traditional healing n1ethods an1ongst the ;\laska NativTs. The [~-ye o/Afedicinal Plants by the Alaska ~Vatives (6) describes the use of traditional medicine hy each of the r
  1 document  
Author
Kathleen Murray
Author Affiliation
Alaska Medical Library, University of Alaska Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
Source
Pages 871-875 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):871-875
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Health Services, Indigenous - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Tuberculosis - ethnology
Abstract
Robert Fortuine provided basic medical care to Alaska Native people, chronicled the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration and through a number of influential publications, was the first to thoroughly document and analyse Alaska's Medical History. This overview of his published work will provide the reader with a detailed overview, so that they can begin to explore Dr. Fortuine's many published works in more detail.
This review will explore Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration through the research files and the 10 most significant publications of Dr. Robert Fortuine.
Review of Dr. Fortuine's major works and the master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. The master bibliography is a merger of 55 separate bibliographies, which provides a wealth of bibliographic information. This paper will describe his 10 most significant publications, 2 of which began as a journal issue.
Dr. Fortuine was a prolific writer throughout his career, publishing 134 articles and books. He wrote papers and books on Alaska's medical history, tuberculosis and health care delivery from Russian-America through the Public Health Service efforts in the territory and then the State of Alaska. The master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. This list has a significant number of entries for tuberculosis with almost one-third of the entries including this heading. Others dwell on the history of "pre-contact" health, the history of Alaska Native health care, the history of the Alaska Department of Health, especially the tuberculosis programme, the role of the US Public Health Service and traditional medicine. He completely reviewed every Governors' and the US Surgeon General's reports in regard to Alaska content. This paper describes his 10 most significant publications.
Robert Fortuine's published works offer a wealth of information and insight into Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration. As is probably true for many historians, he began small, creating a bibliography and adapting a talk before tackling his first full-length book. Readers who sample his many works will be enriched and enlightened.
Notes
Cites: Alaska Med. 1988 Nov-Dec;30(6):189-2263223565
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1993;52 Suppl 8:1-3538352863
PubMed ID
23967418 View in PubMed
Documents
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Deception and self-deception in shamanism and psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6428
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1980;26(1):41-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
R. Warner
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1980;26(1):41-52
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
British Columbia
Comparative Study
Humans
Indians, North American
Internship and Residency
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mexico
Psychiatry
Psychotherapy - methods
Self Concept
Suggestion
Abstract
The author argues that both shaman and psychiatrist are obliged to use a degree of self-deception in assuming their roles. The shaman must rationalize his use of trickery to impress his patients, and the psychiatrist deceives himself that his psychotherapeutic techniques have specific healing properties in the face of evidence which suggests that he often merely mobilizes the general effects of placebo and suggestion. Shaman and psychiatrist appear to use the same mental mechanisms in deceiving themselves. Inadequate method and theory may be supported by reference to personal experience and unrelated data or defended by circular reasoning or comparison with an even more inadequate system. The practitioner may also allow his perception of his abilities to be moulded by social consensus.
PubMed ID
7399823 View in PubMed
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First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness Strategic Action Plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294129
Source
Health Canada. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2007]
) Traditional and cultural ways of healing Improved communication, sharing of information Coordinated continuum of services Increase number of workers with appropriate mental health and addictions and cultural awareness training Reduce burnout and support existing staff (clinical supervision) Alianait
  1 document  
Author
Langlois, Kathy
Author Affiliation
Director General, Community Programs Directorate, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Source
Health Canada. 16 p.
Date
[2007]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2814930
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Mental health
First Nations
Inuits
Notes
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Documents

Kathy_Langlois__Strategic_Action_Plan-mental_wellness.pdf

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An overview of Aboriginal health research in the social sciences: current trends and future directions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92194
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Jun;67(2-3):179-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Wilson Kathi
Young T Kue
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto Mississauga, Toronto, Canada. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Jun;67(2-3):179-89
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Health Services Research
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Research - trends
Rural Population
Social Sciences - trends
Urban Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine if Aboriginal health research conducted within the field of social sciences reflects the population and geographic diversity of the Aboriginal population. STUDY DESIGN: Review. METHODS: We searched the Web of Science Social Science Citation Index, the Arts and Humanities Citation Index and Scholars Portal for the time period 1995-2005 using search terms to reflect different names used to refer to Canada's Aboriginal peoples. Citations that did not focus on health or Canada were eliminated. Each paper was coded according to 7 broad categories: Aboriginal identity group; geography; age; health status; health determinants; health services; and methods. RESULTS: Based on the 96 papers reviewed, the results show an under-representation of Métis and urban Aboriginal peoples. Most of the papers are on health status and non-medical determinants of health, with a particular focus on chronic conditions and life-style behaviours. Only 6 papers examined traditional approaches to healing and/or access to traditional healers/medicines. A small number involved the use of community-based research methods. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is required to address gaps in the current body of literature. Community-based research studies are necessary to address gaps that are most relevant to Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
18767338 View in PubMed
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Reclaiming birth, health, and community: midwifery in the Inuit villages of Nunavik, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77294
Source
J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;52(4):384-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Van Wagner Vicki
Epoo Brenda
Nastapoka Julie
Harney Evelyn
Author Affiliation
Ryerson University Midwifery Education Program, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. vvanwagn@ryerson.ca
Source
J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;52(4):384-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Inuits
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Midwifery - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Ontario
Pregnancy
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article describes the Inuulitsivik midwifery service and education program, an internationally recognized approach to returning childbirth to the remote Hudson coast communities of Nunavik, the Inuit region of Quebec, Canada. The service is seen as a model of community-based education of Aboriginal midwives, integrating both traditional and modern approaches to care and education. Developed in response to criticisms of the policy of evacuating women from the region in order to give birth in hospitals in southern Canada, the midwifery service is integrally linked to community development, cultural revival, and healing from the impacts of colonization. The midwifery-led collaborative model of care involves effective teamwork between midwives, physicians, and nurses working in the remote villages and at the regional and tertiary referral centers. Evaluative research has shown improved outcomes for this approach to returning birth to remote communities, and this article reports on recent data. Despite regional recognition and wide acknowledgement of their success in developing and sustaining a model for remote maternity care and aboriginal education for the past 20 years, the Nunavik midwives have not achieved formal recognition of their graduates under the Quebec Midwifery Act.
PubMed ID
17603961 View in PubMed
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Helping Inuit clients: Cultural relevance and effective counselling

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75344
Source
Pages 135-138 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
and \\Testen1 counselling. Study Designll\1Iethods. The essential corn ponents and value folm- dations of effective YVestern counselling, including inulticultural counselling, \Vere identified from pri- 1na1)'' and secondary counselling texts. Inuit traditional values and helping practices \Vere
  1 document  
Author
Korhonen, M
Author Affiliation
National Aboriginal Health Organization, Ajunniniq Centre, Ottawa, Canada. mkorhone@naho.ca
Source
Pages 135-138 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Counseling
Cultural Characteristics
Elder
Humans
Interviews
Inuits
Nunavut
Talk therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the fit between Inuit conceptions of effective helping and Western counselling. STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: The essential components and value foundations of effective Western counselling, including multicultural counselling, were identified from primary and secondary counselling texts. Inuit traditional values and helping practices were identified from the transcripts of interviews with Inuit elders. Interviews with 5 younger Inuit provided information about the counselling needs of contemporary Inuit. Grounded theory analysis of all texts and interview transcripts was used to determine each informant group's conceptions of the elements of effective counselling. A comparative chart was then constructed of the important relationship factors, strategies and process, and effective interventions identified by each informant group. RESULTS: The values and relationship factors of effective counselling are similar in traditional and Western helping, and these same factors are important to the contemporary Inuit interviewed. Affective, behavioural and cognitive interventions were used traditionally; modern generic counselling also uses a variety of strategies from these three primary categories. Cognitive and cognitive-behavioural approaches to problem-solving were traditionally of primary importance, with expression of feelings also seen as essential. CONCLUSION: Western and traditional Inuit helping correspond, and cognitive/cognitive-behavioural approaches especially complement Inuit cultural practice.
PubMed ID
15736638 View in PubMed
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Submission from the Inuit Circumpolar Council to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Right to Health and Indigenous People with a Focus on the Mental Health of Inuit Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294118
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council. 19 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
February 29, 2016
and youth can be advanced by relying on Inuit understandings of well-being and health. We define well-being in terms of the strength that comes from being integrated within a world of human and non- human relations, eating traditional foods, being on the land, and communicating well within
  1 document  
Author
Gombay, N
Schreiber, D
Ford, S
Meakin, S
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council. 19 p.
Date
February 29, 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
704257
Keywords
Inuits
Humans
Health care perspectives
Child-rearing
Mental health
Documents

InuitCircumpolarCouncil.pdf

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Culturally tailored postsecondary nutrition and health education curricula for indigenous populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107884
Source
Pages 781-786 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):781-786
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
development and delivery of academic coursework that includes many or all of the following elements: traditional indigenous lifeways such as diet, food acquisition, family practices, healing, physical activity, indigenous spiri- tuality, and/or resource management; inclusion and development of indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Sarah McConnell
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 781-786 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):781-786
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Cultural Competency
Diet - ethnology
Education, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Health education
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits
Nutritional Sciences
Abstract
In preparation for the initial offering of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), Interior-Aleutians Campus Rural Nutrition Services (RNS) program, a literature review was conducted to establish the need for the proposed program and to substantiate the methodology for delivering integrated, culturally tailored postsecondary education and extension to Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans. There was a striking absence of peer-reviewed journal articles describing culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations.
To complete and discuss a current (November 2012) literature review for culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula designed and delivered for indigenous populations.
The author conducted an expanded online search that employed multiple configurations of key terms using Google and Google Scholar, as well as pertinent sources. The author located archived reports in person and contacted authors by email.
The expanded search produced a modest amount of additional literature for review. A disappointing number of publications describing or evaluating culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula in mainstream institutions are available. Related resources on culturally tailored extension and resources for the development and delivery of culturally tailored nutrition and health curricula were identified.
The present results demonstrate a significant absence of literature on the topic, which may or may not indicate the absence of sufficient culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. There are indications that culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations have the potential to effectively address certain issues of health literacy and health disparities.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Mar-Apr;38(2):114-2016595290
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012 Jan-Feb;44(1):55-921782521
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:1322416784
PubMed ID
23967420 View in PubMed
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First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care (FNIHCC): 10-year plan (2013-2023).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294122
Source
Health Canada. 37 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
will be: • Respect both traditional and contemporary approaches to healing and wellness. • Respect community priorities. • Be available to those with assessed need. • Deliver evidenced-informed, integrated quality care. • Support the individual, family, and community. • Strive to achieve
  1 document  
Source
Health Canada. 37 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
282526
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Health care
First Nations
Inuits
Métis
Community care
Documents

24-14-1293-fni-10-year-plan-report-en-final_33771.pdf

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Evidence In-Sight : Engaging First Nation, Inuit and Métis families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294131
Source
Ontario Centre for Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health. 18 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 2015
respectfully with Indigenous communities. Organizational policies and procedures should explicitly support cultural healing and intervention strategies for Indigenous clients and their families.  It is important to have a whole-organization approach, embedding cultural safety practices for working with
  1 document  
Source
Ontario Centre for Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health. 18 p.
Date
September 2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
616135
Keywords
Canada
Humans
First Nations
Inuits
Métis
Documents

eis_fnim_family_engagement.pdf

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25 records – page 1 of 2.