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Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76511
Date
March 2006
Candidacy Essay # 3 TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES By Michele Riley Kramer 425 S. Linden Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 Phone: 630-968-3279 Email: mkramer26@hotmail.com Candidacy Essay Course 9020 Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center San Francisco, California March, 2006
  1 document  
Author
Kramer, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center
Date
March 2006
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Native
Aleut
Traditional healing
Traditional healer
Yup'ik
Haida
Allopathic Medicine
Tsimshian
Inuit
Tlingit
Shamans
Athabascan
Notes
Graduate candidate essay, author did much of her research in Alaska
Documents

TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES.PDF

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Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2828
Source
Pages 10-12 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Keynote Speaker Traditional Healing among Alaska Natives Rachel Craig Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska, USA In the best of worlds we like to think of ourselves as invincible, healthy, strong, and liv- ing the good life to a wise, old age. Sometimes we fool ourselves into believing these
  1 document  
Author
Craig, R.
Source
Pages 10-12 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Forecasting
Health knowledge
Health Services, Indigenous
Inuit
Traditional healing
Documents
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Source
Nunavut. Department of Health and Social Services. Nutrition Fact Sheet Series.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005, revised 2013
Nutrition Fact Sheet Series Inuit Traditional Foods Nutrition Fact Sheet Series - Inuit Traditional Foods The fact sheets within this booklet were produced by the Department of Health and Social Services, Government of Nunavut, 2005. They are a revision of the Nutrition Fact Sheets
  1 document  
Source
Nunavut. Department of Health and Social Services. Nutrition Fact Sheet Series.
Date
2005, revised 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3398603
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional diet
Traditional knowledge
Vitamin D
Vitamin C
Vitamin A
Iron
Folate
Calcium
Potassium
Protein
Fat
Documents

NutritionFactsheetsEnglish11-13-13-low-res_0.pdf

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Vitamins and minerals in the traditional Greenland diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295343
Source
National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) Technical report, no.528. 44 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Vitamins and minerals in the traditional Greenland diet NERI Technical Report, No. 528 [Blank page] National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Vitamins and minerals in the
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, Signe May
Source
National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) Technical report, no.528. 44 pp.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Report
File Size
907304
Keywords
Traditional foods
Vitamins
Minerals
Nutrition
Greenland
Inuit
Abstract
The relative importance of traditional Greenlandic food items has diminished during the last decades. Today these account for 25% of the Greenland diet with a dominance of fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. This report synthesises the available information on concentrations of vitamins and minerals in the various food items that form the traditional Greenlandic diet. However, through this diet people in Greenland are also exposed to a high intake of heavy metals and organochlorines, due to a contamination of many of these food items. In combination with information on the concentration of contaminants, the information about vitamins and minerals will potentially make it possible to adjust the diet in Greenland, taking both nutrients and contaminants into account.
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Safe preparation and storage of Aboriginal traditional/country foods: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295947
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health. 386 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 2009
Safe Preparation and Storage of Aboriginal Traditional/Country Foods: A Review PREPARED BY FOOD SAFETY NETWORK www.foodsafetynetwork.ca FOR NATIONAL COLLABORATING CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH June 2008 Revised March 2009
  1 document  
Author
Food Safety Network
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health. 386 pp.
Date
March 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2623952
Keywords
First Nations
Metis
Dene
Inuit
Traditional foods
Preparation and storage
Fermentation
Parasitic agents
Bacterial agents
Climate change
Foodborne illness
Food Safety
Notes
"June 2008. Revised March 2009."
Documents

Aboriginal_Foods_Mar_2009.pdf

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Proceedings: 14th Inuit Studies Conference. 11-15 August 2004, the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297328
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2005
Ian Martin and Shirley Tagalik ...................................................................................................... 167 Global Wellness Initiatives: Blending traditional scientific knowledge with community mentorship Tina Melin, Kathleen Douglass, Cindy Lincoln, Sandra Sumrall-Lloyd
  1 document  
Author
van Everdingen, Robert O.
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
2332621
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Language
Culture
Traditional knowledge
Health
Notes
ISBN 1-894788-02-8
Documents
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Breaking down colonial borders in Inuit Nunaat through education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294489
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
May 2017
MAY 2017 / JANE GLASSCO NORTHERN FELLOWSHIP Angela Nuliayok Rudolph Breaking Down Colonial Borders in Inuit Nunaat Through Education 2 CONTENTS 2 Biography 3 Introduction 4 Traditional Inuit Education 6 Colonial History of Canadian Inuit 8 Comparison to Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools in
  1 document  
Author
Rudolph, Angela Nuliayok
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Date
May 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
5410017
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Tradition learning
History
Canada
Nunavut
Alaska
Documents

Angela-Nuliayok-Rudolph_Breacking-Down-Colonial-Borders.pdf

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Food security for First Nations and Inuit in Canada: background paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295948
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada. 32 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
Sharing Networks 13 6.3 Environmental Contamination and Global Climate Change 15 6.4 Access to the Land 16 6.5 Traditional Knowledge 17 6.6 Cost, Availability and Quality of Commercial Market Foods in Remote Communities 17 6.7 The Processing, Marketing and Sale of Country/Traditional Food 19 6.8
  1 document  
Author
Power, Elaine
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada. 32 pp.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
295825
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Food security
Traditional diet
Documents

Food-Security-First-Nations-and-Inuit-Background-Paper-by-Elaine-Power.pdf

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Vitamin C in the Inuit diet: past and present.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295968
Source
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal. ix, 137 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
July 2000
Inuit. ii ABSTRACT This thesis explored the place of vitamin C in the Inuit diet through analysis of traditional food sources, assessment of contemporary intake among women aged 20 - 40 years, estimation of a pre contact intake of vitamin C and qualitative interviews to contextualize current
  1 document  
Author
Fediuk, Karen
Source
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal. ix, 137 p.
Date
July 2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1489428
Keywords
Inuit
Women
Vitamin C
Traditional diet
Baffin Island
Abstract
This thesis explored the place of vitamin C in the Inuit diet through analysis of traditional food sources, assessment of contemporary intake among women aged 20 - 40 years, estimation of a pre contact intake of vitamin C and qualitative interviews to contextualize current food choices that can affect vitamin C intake. This thesis provides the first reports of vitamin C values for several Inuit traditional foods. There are rich sources of vitamin C in the Inuit traditional food although they are infrequently consumed by this group of women. On average half of the women interviewed in each season met the 1990 Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) set at 30 mg/day, however, only 34% of the group met the new Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) of 60 mg/day. Historically, ample vitamin C was obtained through the traditional Inuit food system.
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Health professionals working with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis consensus guideline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294755
Source
JOGC, Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada. June 2013. V.35, no.6. suppl. 2.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
-safe care, cultural competence, health service, delivery, life-cycle, traditional practices, rural health, urban, sexual health, reproductive health S2 l JUNE JOGC JUIN 2013 Health Professionals Working With First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Consensus Guideline Abstract Objective: Our aim is to
  1 document  
Author
Don Wilson
Sandra de la Ronde
Simon Brascoupé
Alisha Nicole Apale
Lucy Barney
Bing Guthrie
Elizabeth Harrold
Ojistoh Horn
Robin Johnson
Darrien Rattray
Nicole Robinson
Natsiq Alainga-Kango
Gisela Becker
Vyta Senikas
Annie Aningmiuq
Geri Bailey
Darlene Birch
Katsi Cook
Jessica Danforth
Mary Daoust
Darlene Kitty
Jaime Koebel
Judith Kornelsen
Ndakaitedzva Tsatsa Kotwas
Audrey Lawrence
Amanda Mudry
Gail Theresa Turner
Vicki Van Wagner
Eduardo Vides
Fjola Hart Wasekeesikaw
Sara Wolfe
Source
JOGC, Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada. June 2013. V.35, no.6. suppl. 2.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1059176
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health
Personnel
Health services
Humans
Inuit
Indigenous
Aboriginal
First Nation
Metis
Social Determinants of Health
Maternal/child
Health inequity
Culturally-safe care
Cultural competence
Delivery
Life-cycle
Traditional practices
Rural Health
Reproduction
Notes
Chapter 1: Definitions. Chapter 2: Demographics. Chapter 3: Social Determinants of Health Among First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. Chapter 4: Health Systems, Policies, and Services for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. Chapter 5: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health. Chapter 6: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Maternal Health. Chapter 7: Mature Women’s Health . Chapter 8: Changing Outcomes Through Culturally Competent Care. Chapter 9: Conclusion. Chapter 10: Case Studies . Appendix.
Documents

June-JOGC-2013-CPG293_Supplement_Eng_Online-Final_NO-cropmarks_REV-F.pdf

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Access to health services by Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302226
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
Author
Hansen, Ketil Lenert
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Finland
Greenland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Sami
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
The third chapter by Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen analyses the major health issues confronting Sami peoples in Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia and the Inuit in Greenland. The chapter includes an analysis of the unique challenges faced by the indigenous peoples living in the far north due to their specific socioenvironmental location with an increased risk of health problems compared with the average national statistics. Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen specifies the major constraints to delivering good quality health care in the North and at the same time outlines how traditional healing is being integrated within health services for indigenous peoples.
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Culture and language as social determinants of First Nations, Inuit and Metis health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295959
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 12 pp.
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
Date
2016
; community development and control of health care systems to make services responsive to local needs; applying Aboriginal concepts of health and wellness in health care policy and practice; and utilizing traditional healing practices (Archibald, 2012; Kirmayer et al., 2000). The Wabano Centre for
  1 document  
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 12 pp.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
1260894
Keywords
Language
Health
First Nations
Inuit
Metis
Culture
Revitalization
Notes
"Social determinants of health"
Documents

FS-CultureLanguage-SDOH-FNMI-EN.pdf

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A Guide for Health Professionals Working with Aboriginal Peoples: executive summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294618
Source
Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. SOGC Policy Statement no.100. 6 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
December 2000
important cultural information, such as traditional healing techniques, should only be transmit- ted orally and not be written down. Thus, at least some impor- tant information regarding Aboriginal health is unlikely to be found in a written format, and much data regarding Aboriginal peoples is not
  1 document  
Source
Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. SOGC Policy Statement no.100. 6 p.
Date
December 2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
38383
Keywords
First Nations
Metis
Inuit
Health care
Sociocultural context
Health concerns
Cross-cultural understanding
Health Resources
Abstract
Objective: to provide Canadian health professionals with a network of information and recommendations regarding Aboriginal health. Options: health professionals working with Aboriginal individuals and communities in the area of women’s health care. Outcomes: improved health status of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Appropriateness and accessibility of women’s health services for Aboriginal peoples. Improved communication and clinical skills of health professionals in the area of Aboriginal health. Improved quality of relationship between health professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Improved quality of relationship between health care professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Evidence: recommendations are based on expert opinion and a review of the literature. Published references were identified by a Medline search of all review articles, randomized clinical control trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines from 1966 to February 1999, using the MeSH headings “Indians, North American or Eskimos” and “Health.” * Subsequently published articles were brought to the attention of the authors in the process of writing and reviewing the document. Ancillary and unpublished references were recommended by members of the SOGC Aboriginal Health Issues Committee and the panel of expert reviewers. Values: information collected was reviewed by the principal author. The social, cultural, political, and historic context of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, systemic barriers regarding the publication of information by Aboriginal authors, the diversity of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, and the need for a culturally appropriate and balanced presentation were carefully considered in addition to more traditional scientific evaluation. The majority of information collected consisted of descriptive health and social information and such evaluation tools as the evidence guidelines of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health exam were not appropriate. Benefits, costs, and harms: utilization of the information and recommendations by Canadian health professionals will enhance understanding, communication, and clinical skills in the area of Aboriginal health. The resulting enhancement of collaborative relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their women’s health providers may contribute to health services that are more appropriate, effective, efficient, and accessible for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. The educational process may require an initial investment of time from the health professional. Recommendations: Recommendations were grouped according to four themes: sociocultural context, health concerns, cross-cultural understanding, and Aboriginal health resources. Health professionals are encouraged to learn the appropriate names, demographics, and traditional geographic territories and language groups of the various Aboriginal groups in Canada. In addition, sensitivity to the impact of colonization and current socioeconomic challenges to the health status of Aboriginal peoples is warranted. Health services for Aboriginal peoples should take place as close to home as possible. Governmental obligations and policies regarding determination are recognized. With respect to health concerns, holistic definitions of health, based on Aboriginal perspectives, are put forward. Aboriginal peoples continue to experience a disproportionate burden of health problems. Health professionals are encouraged to become familiar with several key areas of morbidity and mortality. Relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their care providers need to be based on a foundation of mutual respect. Gaps and barriers in the current health care system for Aboriginal peoples are identified. Health professionals are encouraged to work with Aboriginal individuals and communities to address these gaps and barriers. Aboriginal peoples require culturally appropriate health care, including treatment in their own languages when possible. This may require interpreters or Aboriginal health advocates. Health professionals are encouraged to recognize the importance of family and community roles, and to respect traditional medicines and healers. Health professionals can develop their sensitivities towards Aboriginal peoples by participating in workshops, making use of educational resources, and by spending time with Aboriginal peoples in their communities. Aboriginal communities and health professionals are encouraged to support community-based, community-directed health services and health research for Aboriginal peoples. In addition, the education of more Aboriginal health professionals is essential. The need for a preventative approach to health programming in Aboriginal communities is stressed. Validation: recommendations were reviewed and revised by the SOGC Aboriginal Health Issues Committee, a panel of expert reviewers, and the SOGC Council. In addition, this document was also reviewed and supported by the Assembly of First Nations, Canadian Institute of Child Health, Canadian Paediatric Society, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, Federation of Medical Women of Canada, Inuit Tapirisat of Canada, Metis National Council, National Indian and Inuit Community Health Representatives Organization, and Pauktuutit Inuit Women’s Association. Sponsor: Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
Documents

GuideHealthProfessionalsAboriginal.pdf

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Source
Aboriginal Healing Foundation. 57 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
work today supported by the Aboriginal healing Foundation. In Closing Our Interim Evaluations suggest that the healing is well underway. Traditional therapies, alone and in combination with Western methods, are dismantling the oppressive legacy of residential school abuses. Participants in funded
  1 document  
Source
Aboriginal Healing Foundation. 57 p.
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2278984
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Residential school system
Financial Statements
Notes
"Helping Aboriginal People heal themselves"
Documents
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Strategic action plan for First nations and Inuit mental wellness : Draft.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294756
Source
First Nations & Inuit Mental; Wellness Advisory Committee.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 2007
STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN The emphasis in this Strategic Action Plan is on community leadership, traditional healing, improved communication and relationships and facilitating access to a coordinated continuum of services. MWAC has identified five priority goals within the First Nations and Inuit
  1 document  
Source
First Nations & Inuit Mental; Wellness Advisory Committee.
Date
September 2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
254808
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Mental health
Addiction
Treatment
Counseling
Documents

MWAC-Strategic-Action-Plan-draft-Sept07-1.pdf

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Converging epistemologies: Critical issues in Canadian Inuit childbirth and pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84155
Source
Pages 209-214 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):209-214
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
differences in resources and settlement patterns. Regional differences in birthing techniques aside, the Inuit tradition of pregnancy and childbirth, like other aspects of Inuit life, is subject to a high degree of community involvement. In their model of health care, healing is a process mediated
  1 document  
Author
Douglas, VK
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pages 209-214 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):209-214
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Beliefs
Childbirth
Inuit
Outcomes
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To relate the cultural beliefs and environmental issues surrounding pregnancy and childbirth among the Canadian Inuit to the critical issues facing maternal and child health in the Inuit population. STUDY DESIGN: This is a literature based comparative historical study. METHODS: Anthropological, historical, biomedical and first person narratives were analyzed to determine Inuit beliefs concerning pregnancy and childbirth. These were compared with the risk factors for Inuit maternal and child health identified in the biomedical literature. RESULTS: Inuit beliefs concerning pregnancy and childbirth are rooted in an epistemological framework that differs in important ways from Southern/ biomedical theoretical norms. Evacuation to Southern hospitals for childbirth and the environmental contaminants discourse have both clashed in significant ways with Inuit beliefs, to the detriment of Inuit physical and social health. CONCLUSIONS: Inuit beliefs concerning pregnancy and childbirth are incompatible with biomedical theory, but are not incompatible with biomedical practice. As long as researchers and practitioners become aware of Inuit concerns and adapt biomedical practices to accommodate Inuit cultural and social priorities satisfactory clinical outcomes may be expected.
PubMed ID
17929634 View in PubMed
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Working with First Nations, Inuit and Metis families who have experienced family violence: a practice guide for child welfare professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294614
Source
Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies. 166 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
[2011]
to restore a balance in their individual and family life through healing approaches based on traditional cultural teachings and practices of First Nations, Métis and Inuit people. Culture is a tool and is never to be imposed on any family member. 11. Healing is an individual process that occurs
  1 document  
Source
Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies. 166 p.
Date
[2011]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
26524878
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Metis
Domestic Violence
Child Welfare
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Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: the role of Indigenous knowledge in supporting wellness in Inuit communities in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294616
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 8 p.
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
Date
2009
in the Arctic. Being grounded in IQ ensures cultural continuity, stability and wellbeing. The spiritual aspect [of traditional knowledge] is integral to the cosmological and ethical beliefs of Indigenous societies… The second feature of traditional knowledge is its practical basis: traditional
  1 document  
Author
Tagalik, Shirley
Author Affiliation
Educational Consultant, Inukpaujaq Consulting
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 8 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
682194
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Epistemology
Personal wellness
Health policies
Documents

FS-InuitQaujimajatuqangitWellnessNunavut-Tagalik-EN.pdf

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Circumpolar Inuit Health Priorities: Best Health Practices and Research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297075
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada. Ottawa, ON. 159 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 2012
. Gender-specific activities included counseling for women and families facing abusive situations, or a men’s healing program, where men would meet to talk, play music and make tools. When possible, the group also sponsors hunting trips to get food for community feasts or needy households
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada. Ottawa, ON. 159 p.
Date
March 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2498673
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Mental health
Food security
Chronic Disease
Abstract
This report, Circumpolar Inuit Health Priorities: Best Health Practices and Research, documents and assesses a comprehensive range of best practice programs and relevant studies which have been implemented across the Arctic in the main health areas of mental health, service delivery, food security and chronic disease. Together, the material provides an important collection of information on the health practices and challenges which are impacting on the health and wellbeing of Inuit living in their Arctic homeland across four countries - Canada, Greenland, Alaska and Chukotka (Russia).
This report is the second part of ICC Canada’s overall effort to identify and document the range of health and wellness experiences, studies and practices that impact on Inuit directly and indirectly. The first part of this work was a review of the different health systems which Inuit access in the four different countries. That report, Health Systems serving Inuit communities across the Arctic, was completed in 2011. This second report completes the task of documenting the experiences.
Documents

finalcircumpolar_inuit_best_health_practices_2012.pdf

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A synthesis of the impacts of climate change on the First Nations and Inuit of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294621
Source
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge. January 2011; 10(1):57-70.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge Vol.10 (1), January 2011, pp 57-70 A synthesis of the impacts of climate change on the First Nations and Inuit of Canada Ashleigh Downing & Alain Cuerrier* Institut de recherche en biologie végétale, 4101, rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal
  1 document  
Author
Downing, Ashleigh
Cuerrier, Alain
Source
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge. January 2011; 10(1):57-70.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
343903
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Climate change
Food security
Cultural activity
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44 records – page 1 of 3.