Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 1.

Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part three.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187200
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lisa Dolchok
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):19-22
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Complementary Therapies - economics - education - history
Credentialing - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
Foundations - economics - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Abstract
Southcentral Foundation had to overcome several organizational and procedural hurdles when developing their Circle of Healing program. Among these hurdles was finding a way to credential Alaska Native healers so the Foundation could be reimbursed for their services and pay the healers, and so the healers could work in the hospital along with the staff delivering Western and alternative medical treatment. Southcentral Foundation chose to develop a process for certifying Alaska Native healers as tribal doctors. Rita Blumenstein is the first such person to be certified. Lisa Dolchok is the second. An important strength of Lisa’s presentation is that she helps us broaden our understanding of healing from an Alaska Native perspective. So often we equate healing with curing, and while it can have this dimension, Lisa reminds us there is much more to it. She echoes LouAnn Benson’s presentation in asserting that healing can address illness of the spirit or wounds to the soul.
PubMed ID
21761620 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part two.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187204
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Walter Porter
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):14-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Religion - history
Abstract
For decades, Bible stories have been a source of both conflict and healing. In earlier days, Christian missionaries often went to considerable lengths to question the accuracy of traditional northern Native stories, especially those with supernatural dimensions, and to discredit traditional Native spiritual leaders, such as medicine men and women, angakoks, and shamans. The missionaries’ efforts often undercut Native culture and sometimes contributed to the intergenerational trauma that creates widespread hurt and pain in northern Native communities today. At the same time, a significant number of northern Native people derive considerable solace and support from their Christian beliefs and church affiliations, and many Christian religious organizations active in the North today no longer oppose traditional Native stories, practices, and values. Many northern Native people recognize that there is great value in both Native stories and the stories found in the Bible, but some still feel a tension in trying to reconcile acceptance of both. In his presentation, Walter Porter provided an interesting perspective on this issue, and his approach has considerable potential for healing.
PubMed ID
21755639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187205
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
LouAnn Benson
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology - education - history
Complementary Therapies - history
Delivery of Health Care - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
Foundations - history
Health Care Sector - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Abstract
The session began with three presenters - LouAnn Benson, Walter Porter, and Lisa Dolchok - all of whom are or have been affiliated with the Circle of Healing Program at Southcentral Foundation in Anchorage, Alaska. The Southcentral Foundation is a Native Health Corporation that administers what used to be the Indian Health Service Hospital and Medical Center. In the Circle of Healing Program, the Southcentral Foundation has designed and implemented an approach to health care that allows its patients simultaneously to access Western medicine, traditional Native healing, and other alternative approaches to health care, such as acupuncture. An important figure in this effort is Dr. Robert Morgan, a psychologist who has worked with the program for several years, and who helped suggest presenters for this part of the program. Originally, Bob planned to be present in Quebec City, but family priorities meant a change in plans. Bob's absence had a silver lining, however, because in his stead he sent LouAnn Benson, one of his able colleagues, who talked about the program from the perspective of an insider.
PubMed ID
21755638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Music as knowledge in Shamanism and other healing traditions of Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187197
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Marilyn Walker
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):40-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic regions - ethnology
Dancing - education - history - physiology - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
General Practitioners - education - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - history
Mental Health - history
Music - history - psychology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Siberia - ethnology
Spirituality
Abstract
Several presenters made the point that one cannot look at narrative alone, without taking into account the music, dance, and drumming that, in many settings, go along with it. One of these presenters was Marilyn Walker, who has had the good fortune to work with healers in Siberia. Although academic in approach, Marilyn’s paper also recognizes the importance of experiential ways of knowing. In her Quebec City presentation, she shared some of this experiential dimension by showing and commenting on videotaped segments featuring three Siberian healers. Walker’s paper discusses healing at several levels. In addition to several healing dimensions that she lists at the end of her paper, she mentions the physiological effects of music, dance, and drumming. Current research is leading to a better understanding of how trauma affects the brain and the body, and ways that various therapies, including new therapies focusing on sensorimotor effects, can promote healing. Along with these developments has come a greater appreciation and understanding among some mental health practitioners of some of the neuropsychological processes by which traditional practices such as narrative, singing, drumming, and dancing, may bring about healing.
PubMed ID
21774142 View in PubMed
Less detail

The healing of our people: substance abuse and historical trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90488
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Morgan Robert
Freeman Lyn
Author Affiliation
Dinlishla, Traditional Healing Organization, Mind Matters Research LLC, Alaska, USA.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology
Culture
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - history
Suicide - ethnology - trends
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
For the past two decades, one of the authors (Robert Morgan) has been involved in the development and implementation of culturally based outpatient, inpatient, and aftercare programs for Alaskan native and American-Indian populations in Alaska. After years of observation, it was concluded that the best efforts of our clinicians were inadequate to the task at hand, i.e., that of resolving the social and physical ills that have ravaged the Alaskan peoples since the occupation. Morgan and others sought to create a new model of diagnosis and treatment that combined the cultural strengths of the people with the technical and treatment skills of the conventional medical profession. The model was grounded in a clear understanding of the factors causing disease in the people, and that understanding came from the people themselves. Before the growth of the "healing plant" that Uncle Walter spoke of could be nurtured, it was necessary to first examine the question of cause and effect. Much of the cause is rooted in the "historical trauma" experienced by the Alaska Native People. The effects are numerous, but one of the most obvious symptoms is substance misuse.
PubMed ID
19137484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Johan Turi's animal, mineral, vegetable cures and healing practices: an in-depth analysis of Sami (Saami) folk healing one hundred years ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108063
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2013;9:57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Thomas A DuBois
Jonathan F Lang
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA. tadubois@wisc.edu
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2013;9:57
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anura
Ethnobotany
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional - history
Minerals - therapeutic use
Moxibustion
Organotherapy
Phytotherapy
Population Groups
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
The healing knowledge of a Sami (Saami) hunter and reindeer herder was surveyed as a window into the concepts of health, healing, and disease in early twentieth-century Sapmi (Northern Sweden). The two books of Johan Turi (1854-1936)--An Account of the Sami (1910) and Lappish Texts (1918-19) were examined to determine the varieties of recorded zootherapeutic, mineral, chemical, and ethnobotanical lore, as well as the therapeutic acts, identified conditions, and veterinary knowledge included.
Tabulation of the materials and species mentioned in Turi's descriptions (n?=?137) permitted analysis of the relative frequency of differing types of healing in Turi's overall therapeutic repertoire, his relative attention to chronic vs. acute ailments, and the frequency of magic as a component of healing. A qualitative appraisal was made of the degree to which outside influences affected Sami healing of the period. A further assessment of the possible clinical efficacy of the recorded remedies was undertaken.
Turi's remedies consist most often of zootherapeutics (31%), followed by physical acts such as massage, moxibustion, or manipulation (22%). Ethnobotanical cures make up a significantly smaller portion of his repertoire (17%), followed by mineral and chemical cures (12%). Magic rituals (including incantations and ritual acts) make up a significant portion of Turi's repertoire, and could be used alone (17%) or in conjunction with other types of healing (38%). Turi's healing aimed primarily at acute ailments (65%), with chronic conditions addressed less often (35%). A literature review revealed that Turi's remedies held a marked frequency of likely efficacy, at least in cases in which it was possible to ascertain the precise species, conditions, or substances described. Although it is possible at times to recognize foreign sources in Turi's repertoire, it is clear that Turi understood all his healing methods as distinctively Sami.
The research illustrates the variety and depth of a single informant's healing knowledge, and demonstrates the value of both historical sources and in-depth data collection with single experts as useful means of assessing and characterizing an indigenous population's healing traditions.
Notes
Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Mar 8;134(1):1-1021130854
Cites: Arctic Anthropol. 2004;41(1):1-1321774149
Cites: South Med J. 1984 Jun;77(6):750-46374914
Cites: J Proteome Res. 2012 Dec 7;11(12):6213-2223121565
Cites: Int J Dermatol. 1988 Apr;27(3):198-2033286548
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 1993 Jun;14(6):615-318325534
Cites: J Lipid Res. 1993 Nov;34(11):1911-78263415
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1994 Sep;28(3):149-528000809
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1994 Sep;28(3):153-68000810
Cites: Headache. 1996 Mar;36(3):149-538984086
Cites: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 1997 Aug;72(3):365-799336100
Cites: Maturitas. 2011 Sep;70(1):1-221684698
Cites: Korean J Hepatol. 2011 Sep;17(3):173-922102382
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Feb 7;59(6):585-9222300693
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1982 Mar;75(3):198-2057040656
Cites: Contact Dermatitis. 1979 Mar;5(2):65-72467028
Cites: Med Hist. 1977 Jan;21(1):15-31320407
Cites: Poult Sci. 1975 Sep;54(5):1498-5051187513
Cites: Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol. 2004 Nov;281(1):1201-1115470677
Cites: Peptides. 2003 Nov;24(11):1681-9115019199
Cites: Front Biosci. 2004 Jan 1;9:283-914766366
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 2004 Jan 14;1696(1):1-1414726199
Cites: EMBO Rep. 2003 Feb;4(2):114-712612596
Cites: Phytochemistry. 2002 Dec;61(7):729-3612453567
Cites: Naturwissenschaften. 2002 Apr;89(4):137-4612061397
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2001 Oct;1(3):156-6411871492
Cites: Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):226-3021212322
Cites: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2010 Aug;87(5):1875-920449737
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2010;618:3-1420094854
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 2009 Apr;33(2):82-719324236
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2009;5:219138420
Cites: J Neurosci. 2007 Feb 7;27(6):1261-517287500
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 2006 Sep;36(8):609-6216973445
Cites: Bioorg Med Chem. 2006 Feb 1;14(3):875-8416214355
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2005;1:516270931
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1965 Jan;111:57-6614261730
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1987 Aug;84(15):5449-533299384
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1998 Nov 30;855:805-99929689
Cites: Am J Nephrol. 1999;19(2):111-310213804
PubMed ID
23941666 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Papineau's operation in the footsteps of the traditional surgery of chronic osteitis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237853
Source
Arch Putti Chir Organi Mov. 1986;36:359-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
F. Vigliani
Source
Arch Putti Chir Organi Mov. 1986;36:359-70
Date
1986
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
History, 20th Century
Humans
Methods
Osteomyelitis - surgery
Quebec
Wound Healing
PubMed ID
3331079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healing the body and the soul through visualization: a technique used by the Community Healing Team of Cape Dorset, Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187198
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):90-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Novaliinga Kingwatsiaq
Kumaarjuk Pii
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):90-2
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic regions - ethnology
Community Health Services - economics - history
Community Medicine - economics - education - history
Community Mental Health Services - economics - history
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - history
Faith Healing - education - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Imagery (Psychotherapy) - education - history
Medicine, Traditional - history
Nunavut - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
As Alice Kimiksana indicated, the Healing Circle or Healing Teams evolved to help First Nations people who attended residential schools deal with the aftermath of the abuse many of them suffered there. They use a variety of interventions, some traditional and some more Western in origin, for an innovative approach to a very serious problem. One technique developed by Western psychology, but very useful and adaptable in other cultural settings, is guided imagery or visualization. Often used for performance enhancement in sports, it is also applicable to other situations from medical settings to mental health treatment. In this presentation, Novaliinga Kingwatsiaq of Kingnait (Cape Dorset) led the audience through a modified version of a visualization used by her Community Healing Team. (During visualization one assumes a relaxed state with one’s eyes closed and imagines oneself in the context of a story told by the person guiding the imagery.) The imagery she chose is both symbolically and culturally appropriate. Most audience members were unfamiliar with the process of visualization, and several indicated that they were intrigued by the experience. Kumaarjuk Pii introduced Novaliinga Kingwatsiaq and translated for her.
PubMed ID
21761622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diving down: ritual healing in the tale of The Blind Man and the Loon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187196
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Craig Mishler
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):49-55
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - history
Mental Healing - history - psychology
Narration - history
North America - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history
Abstract
Some stories enjoy a very widespread distribution in the North. Anthropologists and folklorists have long collected and analyzed these stories, and scrutinized their regional variants. Craig Mishler taps into this longstanding scholarly tradition as he looks at the widespread story of “The Blind Man and the Loon.” However, he goes beyond analyzing the form of this tale to explore what gives it healing properties. He wants to know why this story has become part of virtually every Native storyteller’s repertoire throughout the Arctic and Subarctic. One answer is that the main character and events of the story evoke the undeserved suffering that shapes the human condition everywhere. Much of the story’s power stems from its depiction of a ritual for healing the handicapped, thereby becoming a medicinal oral text. Additional power comes from the wide range of local and regional forms that adapt it to local sensibilities.
PubMed ID
21774143 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The traditional obstetrics, puerperal rites and child nursing among Vainakhs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124190
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):51-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kh M Bataev
Z B Kindarov
R D Gairbekova
Z I Iakh'iaeva
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):51-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - history - psychology
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - history
Obstetrics - history - methods
Postpartum Period
Russia
Abstract
Already in the beginning of XX century the traditional healing among Vainakhs consisted ofsynthesis of rational and religious magic methods, especially in obstetrics and healing of children. Some of these methods survived in time and even nowadays keep their medical hygienic significance. Nevertheless, a lot in traditional healing of Vainakhs, the rite side in particular has today only a historical value.
PubMed ID
22611994 View in PubMed
Less detail

The transformative power of story for healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187195
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Louise Profeit-LeBlanc
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):59-64
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Faith Healing - education - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Mental Healing - history - psychology
Narration - history
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Change - history
Spirituality
Yukon Territory - ethnology
Abstract
One of our goals in this session was, not just to talk about the healing power of narrative, but to experience it as well. Louise Profeit-LeBlanc is one of the presenters we invited specifically because of her skills as a storyteller. She has been heavily involved for several years as both an organizer and a participant in the Yukon Storytelling Festival, held every year in late May in Whitehorse. Woven into her presentation is a useful framework for differentiating various kinds of stories. As she tells us a series of stories, she takes us through a wide range of emotions from grief and loss to laughter and awe. For each of her stories, she gives us some personal contextual information that adds to the story’s meaning and helps us appreciate its significance. Her final story, in particular, is the kind of traditional story that has probably existed for a very long time. Such stories may be told with slightly different emphases, depending on the occasion, but they carry wisdom and value for every generation that hears them.
PubMed ID
21774144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Portrait of an Eskimo tribal health doctor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4658
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Nov;21(6):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
S. Juul
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Nov;21(6):66-71
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Female
Health Services - history
Health Services, Indigenous - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Male
Pregnancy
Noatak
Empirical healing
Massage
Medicinal plants
Blood-letting
Keats, Della
Traditional surgery
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 755.
PubMed ID
397781 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1982 Nov-Dec;24(6):101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
S. Kirchner
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1982 Nov-Dec;24(6):101-5
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Community Health Services
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
SelawikSkin, Sr., Andrew
Manipulation
Medicinal plants
Empirical healing
Dislocation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 756.
PubMed ID
6763481 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contextualizing mental health nursing encounters in Australian remote aboriginal communities: part I, history and customs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107475
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2013 Sep;34(9):715-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013

Life, death, and humor: approaches to storytelling in Native America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187199
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Edith Turner
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):23-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Death
Empirical Research
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Laughter - physiology - psychology
Life
Medicine, Traditional - history
Narration - history
Spirituality
Wit and Humor as Topic - history - psychology
Abstract
Edith Turner has been studying healing as a sensitive, spiritually attuned participant-observer for a long time. Despite her academic background, experiential learning and knowing are important parts of Turner’s approach to research. Her efforts to understand healing have taken her on journeys to Africa, Mexico, Ireland, and more recently, Alaska’s North Slope. In these contexts, she has experienced healing offered by others, and learned to heal in various traditional ways herself. In her book, The Hands Feel It (1996), Turner focuses on the role that touch and spirit presence have in healing in a North Slope Iñupiat community. However, her book makes clear that narrative and storytelling are important parts of the healing process, as well. In this paper, Turner elaborates on some aspects of the connection between narrative and healing based on her North Slope experience.
PubMed ID
21761621 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health aspects of Arctic exploration--Alaska's medical history based on the research files of Dr. Robert Fortuine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107886
Source
Pages 871-875 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):871-875
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
healthcare of the Native population, Dr. I 1ortuine \Vent back to a topic he returned to again and again --- the value and use of traditional healing n1ethods an1ongst the ;\laska NativTs. The [~-ye o/Afedicinal Plants by the Alaska ~Vatives (6) describes the use of traditional medicine hy each of the r
  1 document  
Author
Kathleen Murray
Author Affiliation
Alaska Medical Library, University of Alaska Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
Source
Pages 871-875 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):871-875
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Health Services, Indigenous - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Tuberculosis - ethnology
Abstract
Robert Fortuine provided basic medical care to Alaska Native people, chronicled the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration and through a number of influential publications, was the first to thoroughly document and analyse Alaska's Medical History. This overview of his published work will provide the reader with a detailed overview, so that they can begin to explore Dr. Fortuine's many published works in more detail.
This review will explore Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration through the research files and the 10 most significant publications of Dr. Robert Fortuine.
Review of Dr. Fortuine's major works and the master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. The master bibliography is a merger of 55 separate bibliographies, which provides a wealth of bibliographic information. This paper will describe his 10 most significant publications, 2 of which began as a journal issue.
Dr. Fortuine was a prolific writer throughout his career, publishing 134 articles and books. He wrote papers and books on Alaska's medical history, tuberculosis and health care delivery from Russian-America through the Public Health Service efforts in the territory and then the State of Alaska. The master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. This list has a significant number of entries for tuberculosis with almost one-third of the entries including this heading. Others dwell on the history of "pre-contact" health, the history of Alaska Native health care, the history of the Alaska Department of Health, especially the tuberculosis programme, the role of the US Public Health Service and traditional medicine. He completely reviewed every Governors' and the US Surgeon General's reports in regard to Alaska content. This paper describes his 10 most significant publications.
Robert Fortuine's published works offer a wealth of information and insight into Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration. As is probably true for many historians, he began small, creating a bibliography and adapting a talk before tackling his first full-length book. Readers who sample his many works will be enriched and enlightened.
Notes
Cites: Alaska Med. 1988 Nov-Dec;30(6):189-2263223565
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1993;52 Suppl 8:1-3538352863
PubMed ID
23967418 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

The shaman and medical care. The case of the Saami Noaidi.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69223
Source
Pages 290-295 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic peoples, centered around the entranced "juggler", the shaman, among other things includes healing. In these regions the shaman is often a doctor, but it would not be correct to say that a shaman always has medical functions. The Saamis, or Lapps, know the shaman primarily as a healer
  1 document  
Author
Hultkrantz, A
Source
Pages 290-295 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Ethnic groups - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Magic - history
Medicine, Traditional - history
Scandinavia
PubMed ID
3078497 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298090
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Allostasis
Culture
Emotions
Ethnic groups - history
Health
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Music - history
Resilience, Psychological
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Singing
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 1.