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Incorporating traditional healing into an urban American Indian health organization: a case study of community member perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123131
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
William E Hartmann
Joseph P Gone
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. williaha@umich.edu
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Needs Assessment
Organizational Case Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Urban Health Services
Abstract
Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available for urban AI communities do not exist in the literature, this community-based project convened 4 focus groups consisting of 26 members of a midwestern urban AI community to better understand traditional healing practices of interest and how they might be integrated into the mental health and substance abuse treatment services in an Urban Indian Health Organization (UIHO). Qualitative content analysis of focus group transcripts revealed that ceremonial participation, traditional education, culture keepers, and community cohesion were thought to be key components of a successful traditional healing program. Potential incorporation of these components into an urban environment, however, yielded 4 marked tensions: traditional healing protocols versus the realities of impoverished urban living, multitribal representation in traditional healing services versus relational consistency with the culture keepers who would provide them, enthusiasm for traditional healing versus uncertainty about who is trustworthy, and the integrity of traditional healing versus the appeal of alternative medicine. Although these tensions would likely arise in most urban AI clinical contexts, the way in which each is resolved will likely depend on tailored community needs, conditions, and mental health objectives.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22731113 View in PubMed
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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2015 Sep;23 (5):569-76 PMID 25471490
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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Utilizing drumming for American Indians/Alaska Natives with substance use disorders: a focus group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121175
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):505-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Daniel Dickerson
Francis Robichaud
Cheryl Teruya
Kathleen Nagaran
Yih-Ing Hser
Author Affiliation
Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) , Los Angeles, CA 90025–7535, USA. daniel.dickerson@ucla.edu
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):505-10
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Middle Aged
Music Therapy - methods
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Drumming has been utilized among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes for centuries to promote healing and self-expression. Drum-Assisted Recovery Therapy for Native Americans (DARTNA), currently under development, is a substance abuse treatment utilizing drumming as a core component.
Focus groups were conducted to assist in the development of the DARTNA protocol. Feedback obtained from these focus groups will inform a subsequent pretest of DARTNA and an empirical study analyzing its effectiveness.
Three focus groups were conducted among AIs/ANs with substance use disorders (n = 6), substance abuse treatment providers (n = 8), and a community advisory board (n = 4) to solicit feedback prior to a pretest of the DARTNA protocol.
Overall, participants indicated that DARTNA could be beneficial for AIs/ANs with substance use disorders. Four overarching conceptual themes emerged across the focus groups: (1) benefits of drumming, (2) importance of a culture-based focus, (3) addressing gender roles in drumming activities, and (4) providing a foundation of common AI/AN traditions.
The DARTNA protocol is a potentially beneficial and culturally appropriate substance abuse treatment strategy for AIs/ANs. In order to optimize the potential benefits of a substance abuse treatment protocol utilizing drumming for AIs/ANs, adequate attention to tribal diversity and gender roles is needed.
Due to the shortage of substance abuse treatments utilizing traditional healing activities for AIs/ANs, including drumming, results from this study provide an opportunity to develop an intervention that may meet the unique treatment needs of AIs/ANs.
Notes
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Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2008;43(12-13):1927-4919016172
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;31(4):499-52617955349
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 2006 Jun;20(2):160-8116770909
PubMed ID
22931086 View in PubMed
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HIV vaccine acceptability and culturally appropriate dissemination among sexually diverse Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136312
Source
Glob Public Health. 2012;7(1):87-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
P A Newman
M R Woodford
C. Logie
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Social Research, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. p.newman@utoronto.ca
Source
Glob Public Health. 2012;7(1):87-100
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines - administration & dosage - standards
Consumer Participation
Cultural Competency
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - transmission
Health Education - methods - standards
Health Services, Indigenous - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - psychology
Peer Group
Prevalence
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study explored HIV vaccine acceptability and strategies for culturally appropriate dissemination among sexually diverse Aboriginal peoples in Canada, among those at highest HIV risk. We conducted four focus groups (n=23) with Aboriginal male (1) and female (1) service users, peer educators (1) and service providers (1) in Ontario, Canada. Transcripts were analysed with narrative thematic techniques from grounded theory, using NVivo. Participants' mean age was 37 years; about half (52%) were female, half (48%) Two-spirit or lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB)-identified, 48% had a high-school education or less and 57% were unemployed. Vaccine uptake was motivated by community survival; however, negative HIV vaccine perceptions, historically based mistrust of government and healthcare institutions, perceived conflict between western and traditional medicine, sexual prejudice and AIDS stigma within and outside of Aboriginal communities, and vaccine cost may present formidable obstacles to HIV vaccine acceptability. Culturally appropriate processes of engagement emerged on individual levels (i.e., respect for self-determination, explanations in Native languages, use of modelling and traditional healing concepts) and community levels (i.e., leadership by Aboriginal HIV advocates and political representatives, identification of gatekeepers, and procuring Elders' endorsements). Building on cultural strengths and acknowledging the history and context of mistrust and social exclusion are fundamental to effective HIV vaccine dissemination.
PubMed ID
21390966 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Alcohol problems in Alaska Natives: lessons from the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83359
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
using constructs and procedures that make sense to community members, avoid repeating historical trauma, are respectful of their privacy and culture, build on their historical traditions of healing, and identify their areas of strength and resiliency (Mills, 2003; Mohatt, Hazel, et al., 2004
  1 document  
Author
Seale J Paul
Shellenberger Sylvia
Spence John
Author Affiliation
Family Health Center, Macon, GA 31206, USA. seale.paul@mccg.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
378308
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Motivation
Nuclear Family - psychology
Risk factors
Abstract
In this Alaska Native study, cultural "insiders" analyzed problems associated with increased alcohol availability, factors which have reduced alcohol-related problems, and ideas for improving treatment in an Inuit community. Participants described frequent binging, blackouts, family violence, suicide, loss of child custody, and feelings of intergenerational grief. Helpful existing treatment approaches include alcohol ordinances, inpatient treatment programs, twelve-step groups, and religious involvement. Participants urged the development of family treatment approaches which integrate Inuit customs and values.
PubMed ID
17602395 View in PubMed
Documents

131_Seale_Alcohol_Problems_1-31.pdf

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"What makes life good?" Developing a culturally grounded quality of life measure for Alaska Native college students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107700
Source
Pages 428-434 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):428-434
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
makes life good? studies investigating perceptions of well-being by indi- genous people. For example, for Yup'ik AN people (in southwest Alaska), discussions of health and wellness emphasized the significance of traditional values and connections to commllllity and nature to healing and sustaining
  1 document  
Author
Dinghy Kristine B Sharma
Ellen D S Lopez
Deborah Mekiana
Alaina Ctibor
Charlene Church
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. dbsharma@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 428-434 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):428-434
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Culture
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native (AN) college students experience higher attrition rates than their non-Native peers. Understanding the factors that contribute to quality of life ("what makes life good") for AN students will help inform supportive programs that are congruent with their culture and college life experiences.
Co-develop a conceptual model and a measure of quality of life (QOL) that reflects the experiences of AN college students.
Six focus groups were conducted with 26 AN college students. Within a community-academic partnership, interactive data collection activities, co-analysis workgroup sessions and an interactive findings forum ensured a participant-driven research process.
Students identified and operationally defined eight QOL domains (values, culture and traditions, spirituality, relationships, basic needs, health, learning and leisure). The metaphor of a tree visually illustrates how the domains values, culture and traditions and spirituality form the roots to the other domains that appear to branch out as students navigate the dual worldviews of Native and Western ways of living.
The eight QOL domains and their items identified during focus groups were integrated into a visual model and an objective QOL measure. The hope is to provide a useful tool for developing and evaluating university-based programs and services aimed toward promoting a positive QOL and academic success for AN students.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984302 View in PubMed
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Community well being and infectious diseases among Alaska Native communities in the Chugach Region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2986
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Natives, many of whom continue to practice a measure of traditional subsis- tence hunting and gathering lifestyles. The assumed control of infectious diseases prevalent in the 1960s is now disappearing, particularly in cases of infec- tious diseases having long latency periods prior to detection
  1 document  
Author
Speier, T.L
Author Affiliation
Alaska Comprehensive and Specialized Evaluation Services (ACSES), University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Psychology, 99508, USA. antls1@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives
Attitude to Health
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infectious diseases
Interviews
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance abuse
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine how Native people of the Chugach Region of Alaska perceive their own communities' health and well being, particularly in regard to infectious diseases. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective focus group interview survey. METHODS: During September to December 1999, 12 focus groups were conducted in seven communities in the Chugach Region of Alaska with 97 participants. Using a set of eight questions, information gathered provided insights into the participants' health-related perceptions and provided previously nonexistent baseline data pertaining toTB and hepatitis. RESULTS: Participants showed a good working knowledge of common infectious diseases. There were misconceptions and a potential for increased knowledge in highly prevalent diseases, but more recently delineated infections in rural Alaska, e.g., respiratory syncvtial virus (RSV), Helicobacter pylori, and less prevalent diseases, e.g., Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The participants expressed a desire for further infectious disease information and dialogue. CONCLUSIONS: This process can be used to develop a risk assessment tool for medical and clinical providers' use in an effort to increase testing for such infectious diseases as HIV, TB, Hepatitis C, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In this case the authors also produced a STD prevention video for rural Alaska Natives, entitled, Summer Sun Winter Moon.
PubMed ID
11768448 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261034
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
). Traditional and western knowledge EchoHawk (27) recommends better integrating Western and Traditional knowledge bases for more culturally appropriate intervention for youth suicide. Allen et al. (15) showed the effective translation of culturally based values into a measurable framing of protective
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Redvers
Peter Bjerregaard
Heidi Eriksen
Sahar Fanian
Gwen Healey
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Michael Jong
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Janice Linton
Nathaniel Pollock
Anne Silviken
Petter Stoor
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
636900
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Mental health
Needs Assessment
Population Groups/ethnology
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide/prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design. We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results. Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion. Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally guided interventions and evaluations. This article summarizes the current climate of Indigenous circumpolar suicide research in the context of intervention and highlights how intervention-based outcomes have largely remained outside of peer-reviewed sources in this region of the world.
PubMed ID
25742882 View in PubMed
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