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Native American health: traditional healing and culturally competent health care internet resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167995
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2006;25(3):67-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Danielle Carlock
Author Affiliation
Arizona State University at the Polytechnic Campus, Mesa, AZ 85212, USA. danielle.carlock@asu.edu
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2006;25(3):67-76
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Directories as Topic
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Medical Informatics
Medicine, Traditional
United States
Abstract
Health disparities between Native Americans and the general population of the United States are a major health concern. Traditional healing and culturally competent health care offer much promise in raising the health status of Native Americans. Traditional healing, although uniquely practiced by each indigenous culture, is generally a system of medicine based on the inseparability of mind, body, and spirit. Culturally competent health care, care that is congruent with the culture and language of the patient, is a growing initiative in western medicine. This article outlines Internet sites and online resources relevant to the study and practice of traditional healing and culturally competent health care.
PubMed ID
16893848 View in PubMed
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Ritual changes in the dentition among the Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270
Source
Quintessence International. 4(1011):103-106.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1974
Author
Bergemann, H.
Source
Quintessence International. 4(1011):103-106.
Date
Apr-1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Traditional surgery
Dental mutilation
Mummies
Dental occlusal wear
Dental extraction
Culture
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Tooth Extraction
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 128.
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Should traditional healing be integrated within the mental health services in Sámi areas of northern Norway? Patient views and related factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146331
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):488-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Randall Sexton
Tore Sørlie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9291 Tromsø, Norway. randallno@yahoo.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):488-97
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Demography
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - utilization
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Norway
Patient Preference
Patient satisfaction
Spirituality
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether including traditional healing methods within mental health services is desirable among users of these services in Sámi areas of northern Norway.
A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey among users of the mental health services in Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway.
The percentages of participants desiring traditional healing modalities within the health services were calculated, and univariate and multivariate analysis were performed with respect to factors associated with a desire for integration.
A total of 186 users responded to the survey, of which 72 reported some degree of Sámi cultural affiliation. Forty-eight had Sámi-speaking grandparents on both sides of the family. The desire for the integration of traditional healing was high among all with a Sámi cultural background. Eighty-one percent of those with Sámi speaking grandparents on both sides of the family desired such an integration. In a regression analysis, both Sámi affiliation and having used traditional healing forms were significantly associated with a desire for the integration of traditional healing within mental health services.
The integration of traditional healing methods within health services has been suggested both by the World Health Organization and is used in some of the services to Indigenous populations in Western countries. This study shows that such integration is desirable among Sámi users of mental health services in Norway.
PubMed ID
20044966 View in PubMed
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Ambiguity and paradox in outpost nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1146
Source
International Nursing Review. 1982 Jul-Aug; 29(4):108-111,117.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Hodgson, C.
Author Affiliation
McMaster University
Source
International Nursing Review. 1982 Jul-Aug; 29(4):108-111,117.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nursing stations
Acculturation
Health services
Traditional healing
Attitudes
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Foreign Professional Personnel
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Rural Health
Stress, Psychological
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1634.
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The changing Alaskan experience. Health care services and cultural identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature667
Source
Western Journal of Medicine. 1983 Dec; 139(6):917-922.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
M. Dixon
W W Myers
P A Book
P O Nice
Source
Western Journal of Medicine. 1983 Dec; 139(6):917-922.
Date
1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Native self-determination
Community health workers
Community health aides
Native regional health corporations
Alaska Native Health Service
Health status
Alaska
Culture
Health services
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Social Change
Abstract
Before Western contact, Alaskan Native populations were self-sufficient in their health practices. Slowly, the Native health care system was replaced by a Western one which was highly effective in treating infectious diseases. As infectious diseases were brought under control by the Indian Health Service, the emergent leading health problems were related to violence, attributed in part to cultural disintegration. New types of Native health providers and new Native-controlled institutions evolved to provide culturally appropriate health and mental health services and to promote a stronger cultural identity.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1496.
Cites: Alaska Med. 1978 Nov;20(6):80-6727404
Cites: Alaska Med. 1978 Nov;20(6):87-93727405
Cites: Alaska Med. 1979 Nov;21(6):66-71397781
Cites: Alaska Med. 1981 Nov-Dec;23(6):65-97325337
Cites: Alaska Med. 1982 Nov-Dec;24(6):101-56763481
Cites: Proc Am Philos Soc. 1982 Apr 8;126(2):91-12111620766
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Source
South Med J. 2008 Jun;101(6):596-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Raymond A Bucko
Stella Iron Cloud
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, USA. bucko@creighton.edu
Source
South Med J. 2008 Jun;101(6):596-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Health Behavior
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Life Style
Medicine, Traditional
Religion and Medicine
South Dakota
Spiritual Therapies
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
This article examines the nature of Lakota health and healing in its traditional form, how the Lakota both adapted to and resisted western medicine, and the state of contemporary healthcare, traditional and western, on the Pine Ridge Reservation and among the Lakota people of South Dakota.
PubMed ID
18475236 View in PubMed
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The healing of our people: substance abuse and historical trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90488
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Morgan Robert
Freeman Lyn
Author Affiliation
Dinlishla, Traditional Healing Organization, Mind Matters Research LLC, Alaska, USA.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology
Culture
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - history
Suicide - ethnology - trends
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
For the past two decades, one of the authors (Robert Morgan) has been involved in the development and implementation of culturally based outpatient, inpatient, and aftercare programs for Alaskan native and American-Indian populations in Alaska. After years of observation, it was concluded that the best efforts of our clinicians were inadequate to the task at hand, i.e., that of resolving the social and physical ills that have ravaged the Alaskan peoples since the occupation. Morgan and others sought to create a new model of diagnosis and treatment that combined the cultural strengths of the people with the technical and treatment skills of the conventional medical profession. The model was grounded in a clear understanding of the factors causing disease in the people, and that understanding came from the people themselves. Before the growth of the "healing plant" that Uncle Walter spoke of could be nurtured, it was necessary to first examine the question of cause and effect. Much of the cause is rooted in the "historical trauma" experienced by the Alaska Native People. The effects are numerous, but one of the most obvious symptoms is substance misuse.
PubMed ID
19137484 View in PubMed
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Ethnocultural aspects of PTSD: An overview of concepts, issues, and treatments

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102028
Source
Traumatology. 2010 Dec;16(4) 17-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Marsella, AJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii
Source
Traumatology. 2010 Dec;16(4) 17-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cultural competence
Culture
Ethnocultural variations
Healing
Healing principles
PTSD
Traditional healers
Trauma
Abstract
The present article offers an overview discussion of ethnocultural aspects of PTSD, with special attention to major conceptual issues, clinical considerations, and therapy practices. The historical circumstances leading to the widespread acceptance of PTSD among conventional mental health professionals, and the subsequent criticisms that emerged from scholars, humanitarian workers, and ethnocultural minorities are presented as an important background to the current controversial status of the concept, especially with regard to arguments regarding the ethnocultural determinants of PTSD. The concept of culture, its definition, and its developmental socialization process, are presented as foundations for understanding the many influences cultural variables have on the perception, experience, clinical expressions, and treatment responses to trauma. A "trauma event-person ecology" model identifies the different factors that serve to shape the outcome of trauma within and across cultures. A therapy outcome equation is presented that summarizes the complex calculus of variables and considerations impacting different outcomes. The many healing principles used by different Western and traditional approaches are also identified, calling attention to the importance of fitting patient to therapist to therapy to present and past circumstances. The article concludes that in spite of what appears to be common neurological processes, correlates, and consequences in the initial response to trauma exposure, ethnocultural variables exercise major influence on perceived causes, symptom manifestations, clinical parameters (i.e., onset, course, and outcome), interventions, and societal responses.
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Is Hahnemann's therapeutic system a mystica?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122287
Source
S Afr Med J. 2012 Aug;102(8):640-1; author reply 641
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Herman Jeggels
Source
S Afr Med J. 2012 Aug;102(8):640-1; author reply 641
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Faith Healing - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Notes
Comment On: S Afr Med J. 2012 Mar;102(3 Pt 1):105-622380886
PubMed ID
22831927 View in PubMed
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Looking for "a good doctor": a cultural formulation of the treatment of a First Nations woman using western and First Nations method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6425
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):79-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
G V Mohatt
S. Varvin
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Department of Psychology 99775-6480, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):79-96
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Culture
Female
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Physician-Patient Relations
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
The following paper utilizes the DSM-IV suggested clinical and cultural formulation to present an example of how First Nations and western treatment methods can work together to treat a First Nation's woman with a serious mental disorder. The formulation provides reflections on cultural elements in the diagnosis and what distinct and common elements are present in the First Nations and western explanatory models for etiology and treatment.
PubMed ID
9842067 View in PubMed
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Culture is treatment: considering pedagogy in the care of Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143248
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Brenda L Green
Author Affiliation
Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, Community Development and Health Sciences, 1301 Central Avenue, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan S6V4W1, Canada. bgreen@firstnationsuniversity.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ceremonial Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Metaphysics
Sick Role
Social Support
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing - education
Abstract
This article presents an overview of culture as treatment, by recognizing the impact that culture has on treatment along with the specific rituals, customs, and meanings related to healing. Attention must be given to the Aboriginal heritage, including various concepts of metaphysics, spirituality, medicines, government, oral history, and language. A pedagogical underpinning of illness and healing is better cared for through cultural messaging and learning that is related to the complex historical legacy of Aboriginal societies, and therefore, culture provides important diverse contributions to current treatment and wellness programs.
PubMed ID
20506971 View in PubMed
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From tradition to evidence: decolonization of the evidence-based practice system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126321
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Esther Lucero
Author Affiliation
One With All, Family & Child Guidance Clinic, Native American Health Center, 3124 International Blvd, Oakland, CA 94601, USA. estherL@nativehealth.org
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Delivery of Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
Culture counts in the prevention and treatment of behavioral ailments. The Native American Health Center (NAHC) has successfully developed a model that incorporates cultural adaptations into EBPs, yet also believes community-defined and practice-based evidence are relevant in the validation of traditional practices. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) traditional practices are more than complementary forms of healing. They are stand-alone methods, developed and used by tribal people long before the concept of EBPs existed. There is a need for funders to respect these practices as autonomous mental health strategies. The reasons for promoting change are explained through an understanding of key dimensions of AI/AN behavioral health issues. These key dimensions were identified in the 2001 Surgeon General's Report and an extensive literature review of Indigenous research methodologies. Recommendations are made based upon their ability to promote AI/AN empowerment, to support movement toward self-determination using the Indigenous Research Agenda model. This model honors fluid movement of Indigenous people through states of survival, recovery, development and self-determination through four categories for action: decolonization, mobilization, transformation, and healing. The end results are options for holistic approaches to influence policy changes in the EBP system.
PubMed ID
22400463 View in PubMed
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Contextualizing mental health nursing encounters in Australian remote aboriginal communities: part I, history and customs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107475
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2013 Sep;34(9):715-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1983 Jan;53(1):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1983
Author
M J Meketon
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1983 Jan;53(1):110-5
Date
Jan-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Language
Medicine, Traditional
Mental health services
United States
Abstract
This paper provides a brief overview of Indian mental health needs, problems, and services among predominantly rural populations, and focuses on issues that arise when traditional Indian healing is made a part of a national health service system. Problems in developing a policy capable of integrating traditional healing with modern mental health techniques are considered.
PubMed ID
6829716 View in PubMed
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Respecting tribal traditions in research and publications: voices of five Native American nurse scholars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173647
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Jana Lauderdale
Lee Anne Nichols
Lillian Tom-Orme
C June Strickland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nursing Research
Professional Competence
Transcultural Nursing - standards
United States
Abstract
A dialogue with five Native American scholars provides insight into conducting research and publishing resulting manuscripts on Native American topics, specifically healing beliefs and practices. This information provides a means to develop sensitivity and create understanding about concerns held by Native Americans regarding sharing certain defined cultural information with those outside the culture. The article identifies salient tribal issues related to research, discusses perspectives important to tribal nations and Native individuals surrounding research, and supplies a base on which to formulate further discussions.
PubMed ID
16044622 View in PubMed
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Hallucinogenic drugs and plants in psychotherapy and shamanism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203290
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 1998 Oct-Dec;30(4):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Metzner
Author Affiliation
California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, USA. rmetzner@svn.net
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 1998 Oct-Dec;30(4):333-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Hallucinogens - therapeutic use
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Psychotherapy
Shamanism
Abstract
Western psychotherapy and indigenous shamanic healing systems have both used psychoactive drugs or plants for healing and obtaining knowledge (called "diagnosis" or "divination" respectively). While there are superficial similarities between psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy and shamanic healing with hallucinogenic plants, there are profound differences in the underlying worldview and conceptions of reality. Four paradigms are reviewed: (1) psychedelic psychotherapy within the standard Western paradigm--here the drug is used to amplify and intensify the processes of internal self-analysis and self-understanding; (2) shamanic rituals of healing and divination, which involve primarily the shaman or healer taking the medicine in order to be able to "see" the causes of illness and know what kind of remedy to apply; (3) syncretic folk religious ceremonies, in which the focus seems to be a kind of community bonding and celebratory worship; and (4) the "hybrid shamanic therapeutic rituals," which incorporate some features of the first two traditions. There are two points in which the worldview of the shamanic and hybrid shamanic ceremonies differs radically from the accepted Western worldview: (1) the belief and assumption (really, perception) that there are multiple realities ("worlds") that can be explored in expanded states of consciousness; and (2) the belief that "spirits," the beings one encounters in dreams and visions, are just as real as the physical organism.
PubMed ID
9924839 View in PubMed
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Proceedings: 14th Inuit Studies Conference. 11-15 August 2004, the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297328
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2005
Ian Martin and Shirley Tagalik ...................................................................................................... 167 Global Wellness Initiatives: Blending traditional scientific knowledge with community mentorship Tina Melin, Kathleen Douglass, Cindy Lincoln, Sandra Sumrall-Lloyd
  1 document  
Author
van Everdingen, Robert O.
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
2332621
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Language
Culture
Traditional knowledge
Health
Notes
ISBN 1-894788-02-8
Documents
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Consultations with Anishinaabe (Ojibway) healers in a Manitoba community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227759
Source
Pages 213-216 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
, the terms Ojibwa, Saulteawi:, and Chip- pewa, arc commonly used to refer to the An- Wtinaahcg). At the outset it isimportanttopoint out that gaining detailed koowtcdge about.A.ni.shinaabc healing practices was not a n:scan1! objtttivc, and no claims are made of specialized knowledge about these
  1 document  
Author
L C Garro
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Pages 213-216 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American
Manitoba
Medicine, Traditional
PubMed ID
1365107 View in PubMed
Documents
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Sorcery and penicillin: treating illness on a Papua New Guinea island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103381
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(10):1049-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M. Lepowsky
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(10):1049-63
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community health workers
Culture
Delivery of Health Care - methods
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Papua New Guinea
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Primary Health Care
Sociology, Medical
Superstitions
Taboo
Abstract
Research on a remote and culturally conservative Papua New Guinea island before and after the introduction of biomedical primary health care in the form of government aid posts shows that beliefs in the supernatural causation of serious illness and death by sorcery, witchcraft or taboo violation remain largely unchanged after a decade. Most islanders first seek treatment from traditional healers who can identify and combat the underlying supernatural causes of illness. A healer, traditional or modern, must be greatly trusted by patient and kin due to fears of sorcery and witchcraft attack, and aid post orderlies, from a different cultural and linguistic group, find it difficult to gain the confidence of the community. Orderlies and other health care providers should not present themselves as being in competition with traditional healers but concentrate on earning the trust of community members. Individuals from the local community should be offered training as aid post orderlies and primary health care workers. The islanders' hierarchy of resort to medical treatment is variable, and biomedicine and traditional healing have not assumed complementary functions. Traditional theories of disease causation and treatment are part of indigenous religious beliefs and thus highly resistant to change. Acceptance of biomedical treatment can occur without rejection of supernatural theories of disease causation. The rate of acceptance may vary among ethnic groups within the same country or region due to underlying cultural or religious differences. The constraints of inter-ethnic differences and of traditional beliefs concerning health and illness within which the health system must function in this case are found in many multi-ethnic developing countries.
PubMed ID
2363057 View in PubMed
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Reconstruction and resistance: cultural responses to living the health transition in French Polynesia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181878
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2002 Sep;9(2):290-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Lisa Henry
Author Affiliation
University of North Texas, Department of Anthropology, PO Box 310409, Denton, TX 76203, USA.
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2002 Sep;9(2):290-5
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Developing Countries
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous
Health Transition
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Polynesia
Primary Health Care
Rural Health Services
Social Change
Urban Health Services
Abstract
This paper highlights Tahitian healing in response to rapid cultural change in French Polynesia. First, I examine the reconstruction and adaptation of Tahitian healing to cultural, economic, political, and health transitions in the past 40 years. Second, I address the issue of resistance by non-urban healers to the transformations of Tahitian healing in the urban context. Specifically, I argue that the reluctance of village healers to collaboration, association, and government legitimation (urban transitions) suggests that the status of Tahitian healing is a contested issue. The experiences of contemporary Tahitian healers challenge the unilinear health transition framework, which suggests that indigenous medicine will submit to globalization pressures and absorb a biomedical epistemology.
PubMed ID
14736117 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 2.