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Qualitative study of the use of traditional healing by asthmatic Navajo families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3813
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2003;11(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Van Sickle, D.
Morgan, F.
Wright, A.L.
Author Affiliation
Arizona Respiratory Center and Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Tucson 85724, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2003;11(1):1-18
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Philosophy, Medical
Qualitative Research
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spiritual Therapies
Abstract
Despite increasing prevalence of asthma among American Indians and/or Alaska Natives, little is known about their use of traditional healing in its management. A convenience sample of 24 Navajo families with asthmatic members (n=35) was interviewed between June 1997 and September 1998. While 46% of families had previously used traditional healing, only 29% sought traditional healing for asthma. Use of traditional healing was unrelated to use of biomedical therapies, hospitalizations, or emergency services. Practical factors and questions about the nature and origins of asthma were the primary considerations determining use of traditional medicine. Little conflict between traditional healing and biomedical treatment was reported. The use of traditional healing for asthma is influenced by beliefs about the disease and factors specific to the individual, including their local social, economic, and cultural context.
PubMed ID
12955629 View in PubMed
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Discrimination and participation in traditional healing for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112532
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Jacquelene F Moghaddam
Sandra L Momper
Timothy Fong
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, jacquelene@post.harvard.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Female
Great Lakes Region - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine, Traditional - utilization
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Discrimination - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Contemporary American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) who live in urban areas today face the daunting task of navigating an urban landscape while maintaining the facets of their respective Native cultures. While AIs/ANs continue to grapple with the intergenerational trauma associated with forced assimilation, relocation movements, and boarding schools, these traumas have manifested themselves in elevated rates of psychopathology. AIs/ANs have elevated rates of domestic abuse, poverty, suicide, and substance misuse. Furthermore, AIs/ANs, like many other minority cultures often face discrimination in their everyday lives. In light of the aversive experiences they face, AI/AN people have followed the tenets of ritual and traditional healing to address imbalances in the body, mind, and spirit. For providers working with AI/AN clients, it is important to understand who is using traditional healing and why they are using alternative services. Secondary data analyses of survey data from 389 urban AIs/ANs were utilized in order to determine the relationship between experiences of discrimination and traditional healing use. Analyses indicated that experiences of discrimination in healthcare settings were significantly associated with participation in traditional healing. Analyses also indicated that nearly a quarter of the sample reported discrimination in a healthcare setting, roughly half of the sample had used traditional healing, and that the majority of those who had used traditional healing were women, and ages 35-44 (27%). This study calls attention to the socio-demographic factors implicated in traditional healing use by urban AI/AN people, in addition to the clinical and demographic characteristics of this sample.
PubMed ID
23821254 View in PubMed
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Comparative use of biomedical services and traditional healing options by American Indian veterans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196220
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Jan;52(1):68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
D. Gurley
D K Novins
M C Jones
J. Beals
J H Shore
S M Manson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80220, USA.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Jan;52(1):68-74
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - utilization
Hospitals, Veterans - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Questionnaires
Southwestern United States
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Veterans - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study described service use among American Indian veterans, compared use patterns across biomedical care and traditional healing options, and tested whether utilization varied as a function of need or availability.
A cross-sectional survey of 621 male combat veterans selected from tribal rolls was conducted between 1992 and 1995 in American Indian reservation communities in the Southwest and in the Northern Plains. Measures included assessments of demographic characteristics, physical and mental health conditions, and self-reports of any use during the past year of Veterans Administration (VA), Indian Health Service (IHS), and other biomedical services as well as participation in traditional ceremonies and use of indigenous healing options.
Tribal groups were similar in sociodemographic characteristics and in number of health problems and mental and substance use problems during the past year. The same types of services from IHS were available to the two groups, and the geographic distance to these services was similar. VA facilities were more readily available in the Northern Plains than in the Southwest, where they were far from reservation boundaries. Use of IHS services was similar for the two tribal groups, but use of VA services was significantly less in the Southwest. Overall, biomedical services were used more in the Northern Plains, reflecting greater use of VA facilities. However, these differences in overall health service disappeared when traditional healing options were considered. Use of traditional healing was greater in the Southwest, offsetting lower biomedical service use.
When the full array of options is examined, service use functions according to need for health care, but the kind of services used varies according to availability.
PubMed ID
11141531 View in PubMed
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Use of traditional healing among Sámi psychiatric patients in the north of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86463
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Sexton, R.
Sørlie, T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway University Hospital of North Norway. randallno@yahoo.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-46
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Arctic Regions
Continental Population Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - therapy
Norway
Personality
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to learn more about the extent of, and factors related to, the use of traditional and complementary healing modalities among Simi psychiatric patients. STUDY DESIGN: A quantitative survey among psychiatric patients in Finnmark and Nord-Troms, Norway. RESULTS: A total of 186 S?mi and Norwegian patients responded to the survey, a response rate of 48%. Of these, 43 had a strong S?mi cultural affiliation. Use of traditional and complementary treatment modalities was significantly higher within the S?mi group. Factors related to use differed between S?mi and Norwegian groups. S?mi users were found to give greater importance to religion and spirituality in dealing with illness than S?mi patients who had not used these treatments. They were also found to be less satisfied with central aspects of their psychiatric treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found several differences in factors related to the use of traditional and complementary treatments between S?mi and Norwegian psychiatric patient groups. S?mi users were found to give greater importance to religion and spirituality and were less satisfied with the public psychiatric services than S?mi patients who had not used traditional or complementary treatments. The study implies that finding ways to include different aspects of traditional healing within the health services to the S?mi community should be given consideration.
PubMed ID
18468265 View in PubMed
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Cupping as a part of living finnish traditional healing. A remedy against pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243932
Source
Acupunct Electrother Res. 1982;7(1):39-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
O. Hänninen
T. Vaskilampi
Source
Acupunct Electrother Res. 1982;7(1):39-50
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Pain Management
Abstract
Wet cupping appears to be a living reminiscence of the traditional Finnish healing methods. Fifteen persons practicing or having practiced cupping were interviewed in Savo Province, Eastern Finland. The knowledge and skills of cupping appear to be transferred by personal apprenticeship within a family or from a neighbour. No written material is nowadays available and known to be used in learning. Cupping is considered by healers to be useful in the treatment of aching and pains of teeth, head, neck, shoulders, back and legs. Cuppers report cupping effective also in hypertension and skin diseases. On the other hand, the method is not regarded to be useful in problems of internal organs. Cupping is done after a sauna and bathing of the patient in a warm environment (in sauna). It is often preceded by massage. The small wounds in the cupping sites are made with the aid of a small knife. The healers have the opinion that bad blood must be removed from the superficial areas of the ailing parts of the body, The cupping sites were more or less specific to the ailments of the patient and the number of cups varied from patient to patient depending on the condition and size.
PubMed ID
6126077 View in PubMed
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Use of biomedical services and traditional healing options among American Indians: sociodemographic correlates, spirituality, and ethnic identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179513
Source
Med Care. 2004 Jul;42(7):670-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Douglas K Novins
Janette Beals
Laurie A Moore
Paul Spicer
Spero M Manson
Author Affiliation
douglas.novins@uchsc.edu
Source
Med Care. 2004 Jul;42(7):670-9
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services, Indigenous - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Southwestern United States
United States
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the use of biomedical services and traditional healing options among a reservation-based sample of American Indians from 2 culturally distinct tribes
Participants were 2595 American Indian adolescents and adults ages 15 to 57 randomly selected to represent 2 tribes living on or near their rural reservations. First, we examined the prevalence and correlates of use of biomedical services and traditional healing for both physical health and psychiatric problems. Second, we developed logistic regression models predicting the independent and combined use of biomedical services and traditional healing
The prevalence of combined and independent use of biomedical services and traditional healing varied by tribe. The prevalence of biomedical service use ranged from 40.9% to 59.1% for physical health problems and 6.4% to 6.8% for psychiatric problems. The prevalence of the use of traditional healing ranged from 8.4% to 22.9% for physical health problems and 3.2% to 7.8% for psychiatric problems. Although combined use of both types of services was common (10.4-22.6% of service users), many used only traditional healing (3.5-40.0%). Correlates of service use included age, educational level, and ethnic identity. For example, use of traditional healing was correlated with higher scores on a scale measuring identification with American Indian culture
Both biomedical services and traditional healing are important sources of care in American Indian communities, and are used both independently and in combination with one another.
PubMed ID
15213492 View in PubMed
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Incorporating traditional healing into an urban American Indian health organization: a case study of community member perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123131
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
William E Hartmann
Joseph P Gone
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. williaha@umich.edu
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Needs Assessment
Organizational Case Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Urban Health Services
Abstract
Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available for urban AI communities do not exist in the literature, this community-based project convened 4 focus groups consisting of 26 members of a midwestern urban AI community to better understand traditional healing practices of interest and how they might be integrated into the mental health and substance abuse treatment services in an Urban Indian Health Organization (UIHO). Qualitative content analysis of focus group transcripts revealed that ceremonial participation, traditional education, culture keepers, and community cohesion were thought to be key components of a successful traditional healing program. Potential incorporation of these components into an urban environment, however, yielded 4 marked tensions: traditional healing protocols versus the realities of impoverished urban living, multitribal representation in traditional healing services versus relational consistency with the culture keepers who would provide them, enthusiasm for traditional healing versus uncertainty about who is trustworthy, and the integrity of traditional healing versus the appeal of alternative medicine. Although these tensions would likely arise in most urban AI clinical contexts, the way in which each is resolved will likely depend on tailored community needs, conditions, and mental health objectives.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Aug;96(8):1478-8416571711
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PubMed ID
22731113 View in PubMed
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The therapist-spiritist training project in Puerto Rico: an experiment to relate the traditional healing system to the public health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245309
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):255-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980

"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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Traditional Native healing. Alternative or adjunct to modern medicine?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217044
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
E M Zubek
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1923-31
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To ascertain the extent to which family physicians in British Columbia agree with First Nations patients' using traditional Native medicines.
Randomized cross-sectional survey.
Family medicine practices in British Columbia.
A randomized volunteer sample of 79 physicians from the registry of the BC Chapter of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Of 125 physicians contacted, 46 did not reply.
Physicians' demographic variables and attitudes toward patients' use of traditional Native medicines.
Respondents generally accepted the use of traditional Native medicines for health maintenance, palliative care, and the treatment of benign illness. More disagreement was found with its use for serious illnesses, both for outpatients and in hospital, and especially in intensive care. Many physicians had difficulty forming a definition of traditional Native medicine, and were unable to give an opinion on its health risks or benefits. A significant positive correlation appeared between agreement with the use of traditional Native medicines and physicians' current practice serving a large First Nations population, as well as with physicians' knowing more than five patients using traditional medicine.
Cooperation between traditional Native and modern health care systems requires greater awareness of different healing strategies, governmental support, and research to determine views of Native patients and healers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7841824 View in PubMed
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Traditional and western healing practices for alcoholism in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6426
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1998 Nov;33(13):2605-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
P J Abbott
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87106, USA.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1998 Nov;33(13):2605-46
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Alcoholics Anonymous
Alcoholism - ethnology - therapy
Complementary Therapies
Drug Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Religion and Psychology
United States
Abstract
The American Indian and Alaska Native population is a culturally diverse population with a current census of 1,959,000. Prior to White contact, there was historically little use of alcoholic beverages except for American Indians in the Southwest. After White contact, use and misuse of alcohol escalated rapidly; however, the prevalence, patterns, and problems of drinking alcoholic beverages vary enormously even in tribes closely linked geographically. American Indians and Alaska Natives have preserved and revitalized a number of traditional healing practices and applied these to the treatment of alcohol-related problems. These healing practices include the following: nativistic movements, sacred dances, sweat lodges, talking circle, four circles, and cultural enhancement programs. Additionally, Western treatment approaches have been applied in the treatment of problems related to alcohol, such as medication for detoxification, disulfiram (Antabuse), Alcoholics Anonymous, and behavioral interventions. Several investigators have completed a small number of naturalistic follow-up studies, but no one has undertaken a randomized controlled trial looking at specific methods of alcohol treatment in American Indians or Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native communities have adapted and integrated both Traditional and Western approaches to fit their own unique sociocultural needs.
PubMed ID
9818991 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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The healing of our people: substance abuse and historical trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90488
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Morgan Robert
Freeman Lyn
Author Affiliation
Dinlishla, Traditional Healing Organization, Mind Matters Research LLC, Alaska, USA.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):84-98
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology
Culture
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - history
Suicide - ethnology - trends
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
For the past two decades, one of the authors (Robert Morgan) has been involved in the development and implementation of culturally based outpatient, inpatient, and aftercare programs for Alaskan native and American-Indian populations in Alaska. After years of observation, it was concluded that the best efforts of our clinicians were inadequate to the task at hand, i.e., that of resolving the social and physical ills that have ravaged the Alaskan peoples since the occupation. Morgan and others sought to create a new model of diagnosis and treatment that combined the cultural strengths of the people with the technical and treatment skills of the conventional medical profession. The model was grounded in a clear understanding of the factors causing disease in the people, and that understanding came from the people themselves. Before the growth of the "healing plant" that Uncle Walter spoke of could be nurtured, it was necessary to first examine the question of cause and effect. Much of the cause is rooted in the "historical trauma" experienced by the Alaska Native People. The effects are numerous, but one of the most obvious symptoms is substance misuse.
PubMed ID
19137484 View in PubMed
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Native healing in Alaska. Report from Serpentine Hot Springs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature334
Source
Western Journal of Medicine. 1983 Dec;139(6):923-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
Book, P.A.
Dixon, M.
Kirchner, S.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source
Western Journal of Medicine. 1983 Dec;139(6):923-7
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Serpentine Hot Springs
Hot springs
Sweat bath
Empirical healing
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Balneology
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 238.
Less detail

Symbolic healing of early psychosis: psychoeducation and sociocultural processes of recovery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161061
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;31(3):283-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
John Aggergaard Larsen
Author Affiliation
European Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7TE, UK. j.larsen@surrey.ac.uk
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;31(3):283-306
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Case Management
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Community Mental Health Services
Denmark
Health status
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Patient Education as Topic
Placebo Effect
Psychotherapeutic Processes
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Schizophrenia - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Symbolism
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This article analyzes sociocultural processes of recovery in a Danish mental health service providing two years of integrated biopsychosocial treatment following first-episode psychosis. The study is based on ethnographic research in the service and person-centered involvement with 15 clients. The analysis applies Dow's [1986 American Anthropologist 88:56-69] model of universal components of symbolic healing to elucidate sociocultural aspects of therapeutic efficacy that are alternatively disregarded as placebo or nonspecific effects. It is demonstrated how staff engaged with clients to deliver "psychoeducation" that provided scientific and biomedical theories about mental illness, constituting a shared "mythic world" that was accepted as an experiential truth and used to explain clients' illness experiences. The analysis highlights the need to supplement attention in Dow's model to the healing procedure with consideration of variability in the healing process. Depending on individual responses to the intervention, the staff's professional backgrounds and staff-client relationships different recovery models were applied. One suggested "episodic psychosis" and full recovery, and the other suggested "chronic schizophrenia" and the necessity of comprehensive life adjustments to the mental illness. The recovery models influenced clients' perspectives on illness and self as they engaged in identity work, negotiating future plans and individual life projects by including also alternative systems of explanation from the wider cultural repertoire.
PubMed ID
17902041 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal peoples, health and healing approaches: the effects of age and place on health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139688
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Sylvia Abonyi
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Mississauga, Department of Geography, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Middle Aged
Social Identification
Young Adult
Abstract
For demographic reasons and as a result of a number of high profile health incidents in recent years, much of the health research and policy focus is on the younger cohorts of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. A critical examination of recent demographic trends reveals, however, that older cohorts of the Aboriginal population are increasing at a faster rate than younger cohorts, primarily due to improvements in life expectancy and declining fertility rates. Yet, there are surprisingly few health studies that have recognized the aging of the Aboriginal population. The overall goal of this paper is to examine differences in health status, use of conventional health care and traditional approaches to healing between older and younger cohorts of the Aboriginal population as well as to examine the importance of age as a determinant of health and health care use. Using data from the 2001 Statistics Canada Aboriginal Peoples Survey and contingency tables and logistic regression, the results demonstrate that older Aboriginal people face unique challenges - e.g. loss of traditional approaches to healing, geographic isolation, identity politics, constitutional and legal divisions within the Aboriginal community - with respect to their health and access to health services. These outcomes result from a colonial past and contemporary policies that affect all Aboriginal people.
PubMed ID
21036444 View in PubMed
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Indigenous treatment for alcoholism: the case of Puerto Rican spiritism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241115
Source
Med Anthropol. 1984;8(4):246-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984

Using traditional spirituality to reduce domestic violence within aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146235
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jan;16(1):89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Chassidy Puchala
Sarah Paul
Carla Kennedy
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jan;16(1):89-96
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Battered Women - psychology
Counseling
Criminals - psychology
Domestic Violence - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental health services
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Saskatchewan
Spirituality
Abstract
We report the results of involving traditional healing elders (THE) in the clinical care of aboriginal families who were involved in domestic violence in the context of a clinical case series of referrals made for domestic violence.
Psychiatric consultations were requested from senior author L.M.M. for 113 aboriginal individuals involved with domestic violence as recipients or perpetrators (or both) between July 2005 and October 2008. As part of their clinical care, all were encouraged to meet with a THE, with 69 agreeing to do so. The My Medical Outcomes Profile 2 scale was being used as a clinical instrument to document effectiveness. Elders used traditional cultural stories and aboriginal spirituality with individuals, couples, and families to transform the conditions underlying domestic violence.
For those people who met with the THE, a statistically significant change (p
PubMed ID
20055557 View in PubMed
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Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107732
Source
Pages 270-275 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):270-275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
CHRONIC DISEASE Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology Melany Cueva1*, Regina Kuhnley1 , Laura J. Revels 1 , Katie Cueva2 , Mark Dignan3 and Anne P. Lanier 1 1Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA; 2 1nstitute of Social and Economic Research
  1 document  
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura J Revels
Katie Cueva
Mark Dignan
Anne P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program,Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org
Source
Pages 270-275 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):270-275
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Community health workers
Curriculum
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Inuits - education
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the "Path to Understanding Cancer" curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages.
A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project.
Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009-2012) in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2-3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey.
All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behavior as a result of the experience.
All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs to increase their cancer knowledge, facilitate patient and community cancer conversations, and promote cancer awareness and wellness.
Notes
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2009 Apr;10(2):186-9119372280
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1854322765934
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):522-921431464
PubMed ID
23984267 View in PubMed
Documents
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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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