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Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290827
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
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Place, health and home: gender and migration in the constitution of healthy space.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166261
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):691-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Isabel Dyck
Parin Dossa
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK. i.dyck@qmul.ac.uk
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):691-701
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Afghanistan - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Interviews as Topic
Quality of Life
Refugees - psychology
Residence Characteristics
Social Perception
Social Support
Urban health
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
This paper contributes to recent literature that considers the role of everyday activity in constructing 'healthy space', specifically exploring the tension between agency and structural processes in explanation. The focus is a comparison of two groups of migrant women in British Columbia, Canada: South Asian Sikhs from Punjab, India, and Afghan-Muslim refugees. It explores the routine practices whereby they work to create 'healthy space' as they orchestrate their families' health. Through food preparation and consumption practices, traditional healing and religious observance, the women delineate the physical, social and symbolic dimensions of healthy space. The women's narratives demonstrate the productive capacity of everyday routines in forging healthy space within the particularities of migrant settlement.
PubMed ID
17145198 View in PubMed
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The role played by a former federal government residential school in a First Nation community's alcohol abuse and impaired driving: results of a talking circle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):347-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
J Peter Rothe
Patricia Makokis
Lorna Steinhauer
William Aguiar
Lena Makokis
George Brertton
Author Affiliation
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. peter.rothe@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):347-56
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholism - ethnology
Automobile Driving - psychology
Family - psychology
Federal Government
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Male
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
The study's objective was to better understand alcohol abuse and impaired driving behaviors in a First Nations community as it reflects systemic issues linked to historical, family and community experiences.
Fifteen 18- to 29-year-old drivers participated in an exploratory eight-hour Talking Circle held according to traditional cultural practice. Four First Nations researchers, trained in Talking Circle protocol, and a Band Elder facilitated the data collection, data analysis according to emerging themes, and data verification.
Federal government residential schools contribute to intergenerational effects which impact impaired driving in a northern First Nations community. Traditional parental role modeling has changed dramatically. Rather than guide children through a communally shared development process, many parents now expect their children to assume adult roles by expecting them to take care of their guardians when they drink excessive amounts of alcohol. Because a wall of silence exists between the young and old, many young people seek refuge with friends and peers, who subsequently influence them to abuse alcohol and engage in impaired driving. Many older Band members no longer serve as leaders for young people. Instead, they behave like peers and engage in activities that facilitate alcohol abuse and impaired driving.
Historical institutions like federal government residential schools have contributed to systemic socio cultural problems which influence alcohol abuse and impaired driving. Hence there is a need for community-based intervention strategies that promote cultural healing. The healing journey can start with First Nations communities providing their people opportunities to share their stresses and traumas in supporting and nurturing environments.
PubMed ID
17131973 View in PubMed
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Depressive illness and Navajo healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195586
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):571-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Storck
T J Csordas
M. Strauss
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, USA.
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):571-97
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anecdotes as Topic
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health
Christianity
Depressive Disorder - classification - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Middle Aged
Religion and Psychology
Shamanism
Southwestern United States
Abstract
What is the experience of Navajo patients in Navajo religious healing who, by the criteria and in the vernacular of contemporary psychiatry, would be diagnosed with the disorder called depression? We ask this question in the context of a double dialogue between psychiatry and anthropology and between these disciplines' academic constructs of illness and those of contemporary Navajos. The dialogue is conducted in the arena of patient narratives, providing a means for observing and explicating processes of therapeutic change in individuals, for illustrating variations in forms of Navajo religious healing sought out by patients demonstrating similar symptoms of distress, and for considering the heuristic utility of psychiatric diagnoses and nomenclature in the conceptualization of illness, recovery, and religious healing. From among the 37 percent of patients participating in the Navajo Healing Project who had a lifetime history of a major depressive illness, three are discussed herein, their selection based on two criteria: (1) all met formal psychiatric diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode at the time of their healing ceremonies, and (2) together, their experiences illustrate the range of contemporary Navajo religious healing, including Traditional, Native American Church (NAC), and Christian forms. We suggest that, despite the explicit role of the sacred in religious healing interventions available to Navajo patients, differences between biomedical and religious healing systems may be of less significance than their shared existential engagement of problems such as those glossed as depression.
Notes
Comment In: Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):598-60211224982
PubMed ID
11224981 View in PubMed
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Revisiting the Navajo way: lessons for contemporary healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184352
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Gregory W Schneider
Mark J DeHaven
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA. gregory.schneider@utsouthwestern.edu
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Faith Healing - methods - psychology
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Mythology
Physician-Patient Relations
Religion and Medicine
Shamanism
Abstract
Given the paradox of the success of modern medical technology and the growing patient dissatisfaction with present-day medicine, critics have called for a reevaluation of contemporary medical practice. This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of traditional Navajo healers and their ceremonies to highlight key aspects of healing. A phenomenological view of medical practice takes into account three key features: the lifeworld, the lived body, and understanding. Because of their closeness to a phenomenological view, traditional Navajo mythology and healing practices offer insight into the healing process. Contemporary physicians can appreciate the phenomenological elements of Navajo healing ceremonies, including the Mountain Chant. Navajo healers help patients make sense of their illnesses and direct their lives accordingly, an outcome available to contemporary practitioners, who are also gifted with the benefits of new technologies. By examining scientific medicine, Navajo healing practices, and phenomenology as complementary disciplines, the authors provide the groundwork for reestablishing a more therapeutic view of health.
PubMed ID
12878811 View in PubMed
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Unikkaartuit: meanings and experiences of suicide among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294482
Source
International Journal of Indigenous Health. 2014; 10(1):55-68.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
two communities in Nunavut, community action for suicide prevention can be a mix of traditional practices such as the involvement of Elders, and Western practices such as opening a Youth Centre. This mixing of traditions for Indigenous healing and prevention occurs in many places (Gone, 2011
  1 document  
Author
Kral, Michael J.
Idlout, Lori
Minore, J. Bruce
Dyck, Ronald J.
Kirmayer, Laurence J.
Source
International Journal of Indigenous Health. 2014; 10(1):55-68.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
331552
Keywords
Inuit
Suicide
Colonialism
Trauma
Nunavut
Abstract
Inuit in Arctic Canada have one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Most of these suicides occur among youth, especially males, between the ages of 15 and 24. The goal of this study was to gain an understanding of Inuit experiences with suicide and what suicide means to Inuit, including suicide attempters and bereaved survivors. Fifty Inuit between the ages of 14 and 94 were interviewed about suicides in two communities in Nunavut. Sixty-three high school and college students were also surveyed with the same questions. It was found that suicide was most closely related to romantic relationship and family problems, and to experiences of loneliness and anger. These findings are interpreted in the context of massive social change, on-going colonization, and multigenerational trauma following the colonial government era of the 1950s and 1960s, when family and interpersonal relationships were significantly affected. The study stresses that suicide prevention strategies focus on youth and family, particularly on parenting, and ensure that Inuit communities take control of prevention programs. It recommends that family and community resources be further mobilized for suicide prevention.
Documents
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Population-specific HIV/AIDS status report: Aboriginal Peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294483
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
schools system. The report also details some of the lived experiences of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals in relation to these determinants and supports an approach that addresses the root causes of HIV infection. Connection or reconnection to cultural traditions, values and spirituality is
  1 document  
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2387719
Keywords
HIV
AIDS
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Demographic profiles
Documents
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Calgary Aboriginal services guide: 2011-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294484
Source
The City of Calgary: Community & Neighbourhood Services.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Date
2010
Hospital Liaison Services and Locations Elbow River Healing Lodge Aboriginal Tobacco Reduction Strategy Aboriginal Spiritual Care Alberta Human Rights Commission ................................14 Alberta Ombudsman ........................................................14 Complaint Investigations and
  1 document  
Source
The City of Calgary: Community & Neighbourhood Services.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
File Size
573770
Keywords
Calgary
Documents

aboriginal_agencies_services_guide.pdf

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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Sep;65(6):1260-73 PMID 17521791
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 May 12;17 (1):262 PMID 28499371
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):261-70 PMID 16871832
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-805 PMID 23221918
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 1999 Dec;13(4):483-505 PMID 10626277
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Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-8 PMID 11513933
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89 PMID 20862528
Cites: Forsch Komplementmed. 2007 Dec;14 Suppl 2:10-8 PMID 18219205
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S40-6 PMID 20147663
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Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Aug 7;135(3):189-95 PMID 11487486
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the Chemical Misuse and Treatment Recovery Services (CMTRS) program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294067
Source
Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. January 2000. [192] p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2000
............................................................................................ 5 a. Local Policy Steering Committees ................................................................... 6 b. Local Providers................................................................................................ 7 c. Traditional Treatment Modalities
  1 document  
Source
Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. January 2000. [192] p.
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1247719
Keywords
Alaska
Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation
Intervention, prevention and treatment
Alcoholism
Drug use and abuse
Scammon Bay
Chevak
Hooper Bay
Cultural traditions
Abstract
The Rural, Remote, and Culturally Distinct (RRCD) Populations program of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) awarded funds for projects designed to improve the availability, accessibility, and effectiveness of services to individuals with culturally distinct characteristics who reside in rural, remote, and geographically isolated areas. The State of Alaska, the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) and CSAT signed a cooperative agreement ion 1993 for a special substance abuse treatment and recovery services project with YKHC as the primary provider. the purpose of the RRCD grant funding the project was to create a decentralized substance abuse treatment program in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta that would provide culturally appropriate outpatient recovery services to Alaska Natives in three villages. A detailed review of the literature on cross-cultural research issues regarding substance abuse program evaluations is provided in Appendix A. The project became known as the Chemical Misuse and Treatment Recovery Services (CMTRS) program. This was the first example of a collaborative effort between YKHC, the State of Alaska, and CSAT in joining forces to create a new way of providing services to culturally distinct populations in the Yukon-Kuskokwim area. The goal was for local village members, trained in substance abuse, to provide successful, village-based interventions and treatment services, making maximum use of local Alaska Native cultural traditions and language. CMTRS thus sought to incorporate the wisdom, beliefs , and knowledge of the indigenous Yup'ik and Cup'ik people. Over the course of five years, many innovative approaches in the program were developed to achieve this goal.
Notes
The CMTRS Evaluation is supported by a contract with the State of Alska, Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse. CMTRS is supported through CSAT RRCD Grant #5U94 T100883.
Documents
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A report on the health and cultural status of Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273781
Date
2008
 communities are beginning to initiative  healing programs that have engaged elders in  teaching traditions to the adults and youth 14  Health Services  Elders want services that are reflective of their  cultural values  n  In the past, care for the elderly was the responsibility  of the entire community
  1 document  
Author
Rosich, RM
Author Affiliation
Alaska Geriatric Education Center
Date
2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
Elder
Health status
Abstract
Specific aims of presentation: enhance and strengthen medical students' understanding regarding Alaska Native elders' health status, and disseminate and discuss newly acquired qualitative data about the cultural values, preferences, and customary practices of Alaska Native elders.
Notes
Presentation
Documents

health-status-elders_08.pdf

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Submission from the Inuit Circumpolar Council to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Right to Health and Indigenous People with a Focus on the Mental Health of Inuit Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294118
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council. 19 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
February 29, 2016
and youth can be advanced by relying on Inuit understandings of well-being and health. We define well-being in terms of the strength that comes from being integrated within a world of human and non- human relations, eating traditional foods, being on the land, and communicating well within
  1 document  
Author
Gombay, N
Schreiber, D
Ford, S
Meakin, S
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council. 19 p.
Date
February 29, 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
704257
Keywords
Inuits
Humans
Health care perspectives
Child-rearing
Mental health
Documents

InuitCircumpolarCouncil.pdf

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Source
Risk Anal. 2002 Aug;22(4):751-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Lennart Sjöberg
Anders af Wåhlberg
Author Affiliation
Center for Risk Research, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden. lennart.sjoberg@hns.se
Source
Risk Anal. 2002 Aug;22(4):751-64
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Parapsychology
Perception
Psychometrics
Public Policy
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Religion
Risk
Superstitions
Sweden
Technology
Abstract
This is a study of risk perception in relation to New Age (NA) beliefs, including traditional folk superstition and belief in paranormal phenomena, as well as use of alternative healing practices. Data were also obtained on trust dimensions and on personality and psychopathology variables, as well as religious involvement. It was found that four factors accounted for the investigated NA beliefs, which were termed higher consciousness beliefs, denial of analytic knowledge, traditional superstition, and belief in the physical reality of the soul. NA beliefs were strongly and positively related to religious involvement, and negatively to educational level. These beliefs were also positively related to maladjustment and to concerns over tampering with nature. In regression analyses, it was found that NA beliefs explained about 15% of the variance of perceived risk, and that the most powerful explanatory factors were higher consciousness beliefs and beliefs in paranormal phenomena. Traditional superstition and use of healing practices did not contribute to explaining perceived risk.
PubMed ID
12224748 View in PubMed
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Turkish migrant women encountering health care in Stockholm: a qualitative study of somatization and illness meaning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69180
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;24(4):431-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
S. Bäärnhielm
S. Ekblad
Author Affiliation
Center for Transcultural Psychiatry, Bromma, Sweden.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;24(4):431-52
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Poverty - ethnology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Role
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
Urban health
Women - psychology
Abstract
This paper presents the results from a qualitative study conducted with the aim of exploring structures of illness meaning among somatizing Turkish-born migrant women (age 31-48) living in a poor and low status suburb of Stockholm in contact with local health care services. Two to three interviews regarding experiences and understanding of illness were conducted as well as one year, validating follow-up interviews. Interviews were analysed with a grounded theory approach. Results are presented as the participants' agenda of understanding. Distress was communicated by concrete expressions about the body, emotions, social and life situation. Pain was prominent and often lateralised to one side of the body. The use of traditional expressions of distress ranged from open use to avoidance. Attribution was characterised by verbalising links of coherence between health and aspects of life. Psychiatric attribution was rarely accepted or valued as a tool for recovery, or as helpful in linking bodily symptoms to emotional distress. Three main sources for healing were used: medical care in Sweden and in Turkey and traditional treatment. Own capacity to influence recovery was mostly regarded as low. Relations to family and the clinician were regarded as important to recovery. The encounter with local health care had brought the participants in contact with a psychological agenda of understanding their illness and new ways of dealing with illness and healing. Some expressed a feeling of being misunderstood whereas some related positive experiences of re-evaluation. They were all actively trying, but experiencing varying degrees of difficulty, to grasp the meaning of the caregiver. The results of the study point to the mutual need of exploring meaning in the clinical encounter to help patients make sense out of different perspectives of illness and healing. The need for enhanced knowledge about this process in a migration context will be discussed.
PubMed ID
11128626 View in PubMed
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Developing an integrated traditional/clinical health system in the Yukon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69211
Source
Pages 217-20 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
217 DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED TRADITIONAL/CLINICAL HEALTH SYSTEM IN THE YUKON Margaret A Wheatley Council for Yi.Ikon Indians, Whitehorse, 'fukon, Csnada INTRODUC110N Yukon First Nations, like other indigenous peoples around the wcrld, have afway.i bad their own tradi- tional mcdkal
  1 document  
Author
M A Wheatley
Author Affiliation
Council for Yukon Indians, Whitehorse, Canada.
Source
Pages 217-20 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Health services
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The introductory steps have been taken in Yukon. Elders have met and voiced their concerns and initial contacts have been made with government officials, medical and legal consultants. A proposal is now being developed to obtain funding to design a suitable model for an integrated Yukon Indian/clinical health care system. One of the next steps, following on the advice of the Elders, should be for communities to establish their own projects to record the plants and practices used, with the assistance of their Elders. The communities should also identify people who use traditional practices who are willing to come forward. They could then come together with the Elders to discuss their concerns. Beyond that, representatives from the traditional system will need to meet with representatives of the mainstream system, to discuss areas of co-operation. Once the "content" has been identified, the model for integrating the two health systems can be addressed. This will necessitate further meetings of Yukon Territorial Government officials, legal advisors, medical advisors, and Yukon First Nations representatives. The proposal currently being developed will build on the initial steps which have been taken. The Yukon Territorial Government has indicated a willingness to look at ways of including traditional health care practices for patients who wish to use them. The receptivity of government and Yukon medical profession and the expressed concerns of the Elders indicate that now is the time to proceed.
PubMed ID
1365108 View in PubMed
Documents
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A Cree healer attempts to improve the competitive position of native medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69221
Source
Pages 313-316 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Ingram and Lise Swartz are graduate students in the Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta. David E. Young is a professor in the same department and direc- tor of the Project for the Study of Traditional Healing Prac- tices. REFERENCES I. Bee, R. L. Patterns and Processes. New York. The
  1 document  
Author
Young, D.E.
Ingram, G.
Swartz, L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Source
Pages 313-316 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alberta
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PubMed ID
3272624 View in PubMed
Documents
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The shaman and medical care. The case of the Saami Noaidi.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69223
Source
Pages 290-295 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic peoples, centered around the entranced "juggler", the shaman, among other things includes healing. In these regions the shaman is often a doctor, but it would not be correct to say that a shaman always has medical functions. The Saamis, or Lapps, know the shaman primarily as a healer
  1 document  
Author
Hultkrantz, A
Source
Pages 290-295 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Ethnic groups - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Magic - history
Medicine, Traditional - history
Scandinavia
PubMed ID
3078497 View in PubMed
Documents
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Alaska Natives combating substance abuse and related violence through self-healing: A report for the people

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99506
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1999
  1 website  
Author
Segal, B
Burgess, D
DeGross, D
Hild, C
Saylor, B
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Date
June 1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acculturation
Alaska Natives
Alcohol and drug abuse
Co-morbid disorders
Cultural change
Cumulative stress
Fetal alcohol syndrome and effects
Inhalant abuse
Local option law
Non-Native community
Spiritualism in treatment
Substance abuse
Traditional healing
Violence
Prevention
Indians of North America
Eskimos
Abstract
For more than a decade, the Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) has sought to bring attention, understanding, and solutions to the problem of substance abuse and related violence among Alaska Natives. Progress has been made in some communities, but substance abuse continues to cause suffering, pain, death, and despair among many Alaska Native families. At the request of AFN, this report was undertaken to provide a basis for deriving effective, lasting solutions.
Notes
ALASKA RA448.5.I5 A43 1999
Online Resources
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Canada's relationship with Inuit : a history of policy and program development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294623
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
June 2006
resources, the environment, social programs and the extent and pace of change in the face of maintenance of language, culture and traditional lifestyle. These complex issues and negotiations occur on many different levels, both in the domestic and international spheres. A significant advance in the
  1 document  
Author
Bonesteel, Sarah
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Date
June 2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
16013414
Keywords
Inuit
History
Housing
Health care
Education
Economic development
Self-governement
Environment
Notes
ISBN: 978-1-100-11121-6
Documents

inuit-book_1100100016901_eng.pdf

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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-805 PMID 23221918
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-46 PMID 18468265
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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