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Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
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Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290827
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
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Place, health and home: gender and migration in the constitution of healthy space.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166261
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):691-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Isabel Dyck
Parin Dossa
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK. i.dyck@qmul.ac.uk
Source
Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):691-701
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Afghanistan - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Interviews as Topic
Quality of Life
Refugees - psychology
Residence Characteristics
Social Perception
Social Support
Urban health
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
This paper contributes to recent literature that considers the role of everyday activity in constructing 'healthy space', specifically exploring the tension between agency and structural processes in explanation. The focus is a comparison of two groups of migrant women in British Columbia, Canada: South Asian Sikhs from Punjab, India, and Afghan-Muslim refugees. It explores the routine practices whereby they work to create 'healthy space' as they orchestrate their families' health. Through food preparation and consumption practices, traditional healing and religious observance, the women delineate the physical, social and symbolic dimensions of healthy space. The women's narratives demonstrate the productive capacity of everyday routines in forging healthy space within the particularities of migrant settlement.
PubMed ID
17145198 View in PubMed
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The role played by a former federal government residential school in a First Nation community's alcohol abuse and impaired driving: results of a talking circle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):347-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
J Peter Rothe
Patricia Makokis
Lorna Steinhauer
William Aguiar
Lena Makokis
George Brertton
Author Affiliation
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. peter.rothe@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):347-56
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholism - ethnology
Automobile Driving - psychology
Family - psychology
Federal Government
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Male
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
The study's objective was to better understand alcohol abuse and impaired driving behaviors in a First Nations community as it reflects systemic issues linked to historical, family and community experiences.
Fifteen 18- to 29-year-old drivers participated in an exploratory eight-hour Talking Circle held according to traditional cultural practice. Four First Nations researchers, trained in Talking Circle protocol, and a Band Elder facilitated the data collection, data analysis according to emerging themes, and data verification.
Federal government residential schools contribute to intergenerational effects which impact impaired driving in a northern First Nations community. Traditional parental role modeling has changed dramatically. Rather than guide children through a communally shared development process, many parents now expect their children to assume adult roles by expecting them to take care of their guardians when they drink excessive amounts of alcohol. Because a wall of silence exists between the young and old, many young people seek refuge with friends and peers, who subsequently influence them to abuse alcohol and engage in impaired driving. Many older Band members no longer serve as leaders for young people. Instead, they behave like peers and engage in activities that facilitate alcohol abuse and impaired driving.
Historical institutions like federal government residential schools have contributed to systemic socio cultural problems which influence alcohol abuse and impaired driving. Hence there is a need for community-based intervention strategies that promote cultural healing. The healing journey can start with First Nations communities providing their people opportunities to share their stresses and traumas in supporting and nurturing environments.
PubMed ID
17131973 View in PubMed
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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Sep;65(6):1260-73 PMID 17521791
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PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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The Healing and Empowering Alaskan Lives Toward Healthy-Hearts (HEALTHH) Project: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for tobacco use and other cardiovascular risk behaviors for Alaska Native People.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292174
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2018 Jun 02; 71:40-46
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-02-2018
Author
Judith J Prochaska
Anna Epperson
Jordan Skan
Marily Oppezzo
Paul Barnett
Kevin Delucchi
Matthew Schnellbaecher
Neal L Benowitz
Author Affiliation
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: jpro@stanford.edu.
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2018 Jun 02; 71:40-46
Date
Jun-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases disproportionately affect Alaska Native (AN) people. Using telemedicine, this study aims to identify culturally-tailored, theoretically-driven, efficacious interventions for tobacco use and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk behaviors among AN people in remote areas.
Randomized clinical trial with two intervention arms: 1) tobacco and physical activity; 2) medication adherence and a heart-healthy AN diet.
Participants are N?=?300 AN men and women current smokers with high blood pressure or high cholesterol.
All participants receive motivational, stage-tailored, telemedicine-delivered counseling sessions at baseline and 3, 6, and 12?months follow-up; an individualized behavior change plan that is updated at each contact; and a behavior change manual. In Group 1, the focus is on tobacco and physical activity; a pedometer is provided and nicotine replacement therapy is offered. In Group 2, the focus is on medication adherence for treating hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia; a medication bag and traditional food guide are provided.
With assessments at baseline, 3, 6, 12, and 18?months, the primary outcome is smoking status, assessed as 7-day point prevalence abstinence, biochemically verified with urine anabasine. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, blood pressure and cholesterol, medication compliance, diet, multiple risk behavior change indices, and cost-effectiveness.
The current study has the potential to identify novel, feasible, acceptable, and efficacious interventions for treating the co-occurrence of CVD risk factors in AN people. Findings may inform personalized treatment and the development of effective and cost-effective intervention strategies for use in remote indigenous communities more broadly. Clinical Trial Registration # NCT02137902.
PubMed ID
29864548 View in PubMed
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Assessing diet and lifestyle in the Canadian Arctic Inuit and Inuvialuit to inform a nutrition and physical activity intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99760
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
consist- ing of a diverse range of largely protein-based foods gathered locally (e.g. caribou, Arctic hare, seal, fish, ptar- migan, goose, berries) (Draper, 1977; Kuhnlein et al., 2001). Traditional foods have long been the basis of Inuit cultural identity. Food sharing systems have defined Inuit
  1 document  
Author
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sangitag@ualberta.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
6474495
Keywords
Arctic
Chronic Disease
Dietary and lifestyle transition
Environmental change
Aboriginal health
Abstract
Inuit in Nunavut (NU) and Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, were traditionally nomadic peoples whose culture and lifestyle were founded on hunting and gathering foods from the local environment, primarily land and marine mammals. Lifestyle changes within the last century have brought about a rapid nutrition transition, characterised by decreasing consumption of traditional foods and an associated increase in the consumption of processed, shop-bought foods. This transition may be attributed to a multitude of factors, such as acculturation, overall food access and availability, food insecurity and climate change. Obesity and risk for chronic disease are higher in the Canadian Arctic population compared with the Canadian national average. This present review describes the study population and methodologies used to collect data in order to study the nutrition transition amongst Aboriginal Arctic populations and develop Healthy Foods North (HFN), a novel, multi-institutional and culturally appropriate programme that aims to improve dietary adequacy and reduce risk of chronic disease. Included in this special issue of the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics are papers describing dietary intake patterns, physical activity levels, dietary behaviours, chronic disease prevalence and psychosocial factors that potentially mediate behaviour. A further paper describes how these data were utilised to inform and develop Healthy Foods North.
PubMed ID
21158957 View in PubMed
Documents
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Cosmetic and functional outcomes after preoperative tissue expansion of radial forearm free flap donor sites: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126147
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Oct;40(5):427-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
James P Bonaparte
Martin J Corsten
Murray Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. jbonapar@dal.ca
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Oct;40(5):427-35
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cicatrix - diagnosis
Esthetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forearm - surgery
Free Tissue Flaps
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Skills
Ontario
Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms - surgery
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Suture Techniques
Tissue Expansion Devices
Tissue and Organ Harvesting
Transplant Donor Site
Abstract
The use of the DynaClose topical tissue expansion device for closure of radial forearm free flap (RFFF) donor sites has been demonstrated to significantly reduce healing time and postoperative pain compared to the traditional use of a split-thickness skin graft. However, long-term cosmetic and functional outcomes are not known.
The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that using a new method of donor site management will result in improved cosmesis of RFFF donor sites as assessed by both patients and expert observers without resulting in a reduction in the function of the patients' forearm.
A cohort of 25 patients previously randomized to either the treatment (tissue expansion) or the control group were assessed at 10 months. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (PAOSAS) was used to assess forearm scars, whereas the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire assessed hand function.
Expert observers noted improved scar cosmesis in the treatment group (p ?=? .013), with primary closure having the best cosmetic outcome, followed by local full-thickness skin graft closure (p
PubMed ID
22420399 View in PubMed
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Design of a behavioral health program for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youths: a community informed approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126319
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daniel L Dickerson
Carrie L Johnson
Author Affiliation
United American Indian Involvement, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):337-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - ethnology
Behavior Therapy
Child
Community Networks
Culture
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Los Angeles
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Mental health
Research Design
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) urban youths experience significant mental health and substance use problems. However, culturally relevant treatment approaches that incorporate community perspectives within the urban setting are limited. This study analyzes community perspectives from AI/AN parents, AI/AN youths, and services providers within Los Angeles County. Information gathered was utilized to develop a needs assessment for AI/AN youths with mental health and substance use problems and to design a community-informed treatment approach. Nine focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. The Los Angeles County community strongly expressed the need for providing urban AI/AN youths with traditional healing services and cultural activities within their treatment program. However, various barriers to accessing mental health and substance abuse treatment services were identified. An integrated treatment approach was subsequently designed as a result of input derived from community perspectives. The community believed that providing urban AI/AN youths with an integrated treatment approach has the potential to decrease the risk of mental health and substance abuse problems in addition to enhancing their cultural identity and self esteem.
PubMed ID
22400466 View in PubMed
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From tradition to evidence: decolonization of the evidence-based practice system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126321
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Esther Lucero
Author Affiliation
One With All, Family & Child Guidance Clinic, Native American Health Center, 3124 International Blvd, Oakland, CA 94601, USA. estherL@nativehealth.org
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Delivery of Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
Culture counts in the prevention and treatment of behavioral ailments. The Native American Health Center (NAHC) has successfully developed a model that incorporates cultural adaptations into EBPs, yet also believes community-defined and practice-based evidence are relevant in the validation of traditional practices. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) traditional practices are more than complementary forms of healing. They are stand-alone methods, developed and used by tribal people long before the concept of EBPs existed. There is a need for funders to respect these practices as autonomous mental health strategies. The reasons for promoting change are explained through an understanding of key dimensions of AI/AN behavioral health issues. These key dimensions were identified in the 2001 Surgeon General's Report and an extensive literature review of Indigenous research methodologies. Recommendations are made based upon their ability to promote AI/AN empowerment, to support movement toward self-determination using the Indigenous Research Agenda model. This model honors fluid movement of Indigenous people through states of survival, recovery, development and self-determination through four categories for action: decolonization, mobilization, transformation, and healing. The end results are options for holistic approaches to influence policy changes in the EBP system.
PubMed ID
22400463 View in PubMed
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American Indian culture as substance abuse treatment: pursuing evidence for a local intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126323
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joseph P Gone
Patrick E Calf Looking
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 2239 East Hall, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. jgone@umich.edu
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Evidence-Based Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Residential Treatment
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Contemporary tribal commitments to traditional cultural reclamation and revitalization find continued expression by recent generational cohorts of American Indians who, when it comes to matters of recovery, healing, and wellness in the context of substance abuse, routinely assert that "our culture is our treatment." And yet, empirical investigations of this culture-as-treatment hypothesis--namely, that a (post)colonial return to indigenous cultural orientations and practices is sufficient for effecting abstinence and recovery from substance use disorders for many American Indians--have yet to appear in the scientific literature. Preliminary activities of a research partnership dedicated to the empirical exploration of this hypothesis for reducing Native American substance use disorders are summarized. Specifically, collaboration between a university-based research psychologist and a reservation-based substance abuse treatment program staff has thus far resulted in a detailed blueprint for a radically alternative, culturally-grounded intervention developed for reservation residents. This proposed alternative intervention--a seasonal cultural immersion camp designed to approximate the day-to-day experiences of prereservation ancestors--was designed for eventual implementation and evaluation with adult clients referred for residential treatment on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. It is anticipated that the proposed intervention will eventually afford empirical evaluation of the culture-as-treatment hypothesis.
PubMed ID
22400459 View in PubMed
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Depressive illness and Navajo healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195586
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):571-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Storck
T J Csordas
M. Strauss
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, USA.
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):571-97
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anecdotes as Topic
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health
Christianity
Depressive Disorder - classification - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Middle Aged
Religion and Psychology
Shamanism
Southwestern United States
Abstract
What is the experience of Navajo patients in Navajo religious healing who, by the criteria and in the vernacular of contemporary psychiatry, would be diagnosed with the disorder called depression? We ask this question in the context of a double dialogue between psychiatry and anthropology and between these disciplines' academic constructs of illness and those of contemporary Navajos. The dialogue is conducted in the arena of patient narratives, providing a means for observing and explicating processes of therapeutic change in individuals, for illustrating variations in forms of Navajo religious healing sought out by patients demonstrating similar symptoms of distress, and for considering the heuristic utility of psychiatric diagnoses and nomenclature in the conceptualization of illness, recovery, and religious healing. From among the 37 percent of patients participating in the Navajo Healing Project who had a lifetime history of a major depressive illness, three are discussed herein, their selection based on two criteria: (1) all met formal psychiatric diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode at the time of their healing ceremonies, and (2) together, their experiences illustrate the range of contemporary Navajo religious healing, including Traditional, Native American Church (NAC), and Christian forms. We suggest that, despite the explicit role of the sacred in religious healing interventions available to Navajo patients, differences between biomedical and religious healing systems may be of less significance than their shared existential engagement of problems such as those glossed as depression.
Notes
Comment In: Med Anthropol Q. 2000 Dec;14(4):598-60211224982
PubMed ID
11224981 View in PubMed
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Revisiting the Navajo way: lessons for contemporary healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184352
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Gregory W Schneider
Mark J DeHaven
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA. gregory.schneider@utsouthwestern.edu
Source
Perspect Biol Med. 2003;46(3):413-27
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Faith Healing - methods - psychology
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Mythology
Physician-Patient Relations
Religion and Medicine
Shamanism
Abstract
Given the paradox of the success of modern medical technology and the growing patient dissatisfaction with present-day medicine, critics have called for a reevaluation of contemporary medical practice. This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of traditional Navajo healers and their ceremonies to highlight key aspects of healing. A phenomenological view of medical practice takes into account three key features: the lifeworld, the lived body, and understanding. Because of their closeness to a phenomenological view, traditional Navajo mythology and healing practices offer insight into the healing process. Contemporary physicians can appreciate the phenomenological elements of Navajo healing ceremonies, including the Mountain Chant. Navajo healers help patients make sense of their illnesses and direct their lives accordingly, an outcome available to contemporary practitioners, who are also gifted with the benefits of new technologies. By examining scientific medicine, Navajo healing practices, and phenomenology as complementary disciplines, the authors provide the groundwork for reestablishing a more therapeutic view of health.
PubMed ID
12878811 View in PubMed
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Bill C-51: Proposed federal regulation of traditional medicine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257055
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
comprehensive amendment to the Food and Drugs Act. The Bill caused controversy in the natural health sector and was the source of concern among a number of Aboriginal organi- zations (1). These concerns centre around the effect of the Bill on traditional healing. The Bill was not enacted. It died on the
  1 document  
Author
Orr P
Author Affiliation
Independent Legislative Counsel, Ontario, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, Canada
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal
Bill C-51
Canadian Food and Drugs Act
Medicine
Traditional medicine
Parliament
Abstract
Bill C-51 was introduced in Parliament in 2008. The Bill included changes to the Canadian Food and Drugs Act that some argue would have a significant effect on the delivery of traditional medicine by Aboriginal healers in Canada. Although the Bill has "died on the order paper," it is likely to be reintroduced by the current government in substantially the same form. The paper identifies the elements of the proposed changes in the federal government's legislative policy towards the practice of traditional medicine, as contained in the proposed legislation, discusses their possible effects on the practice of traditional medicine and assesses the potential ramifications on the rights of Aboriginal persons to practice traditional medicine.
Documents
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American Indian and Alaska Native Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294088
Source
[U.S.] National Rural Health Association. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2016
illness, healing, and health. The concept of mental illness and beliefs about why and how it develops have many different meanings and interpretations among AI/ANs. Every tribe had their own 6 cultural traditions that was the foundation of how each tribe maintained their own holistic view and
  1 document  
Author
Frizzell, Linda Bane
Spencer, Kathleen
Source
[U.S.] National Rural Health Association. 11 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
566648
Keywords
Health services
Indians of North America
Alaska
Indian Health Service
Funding
Notes
National Rural Health Association Policy Brief
Documents

AmericanIndianandAlaskaNativeHealthPolicyPaperFeb2016.pdf

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Program - Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294092
Source
American Society for Circumpolar Health and the International Union for Circumpolar Health. 64 p. + insert.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1996
:30 pm - 3:30 pm Km 1 - Nutrition I Km 2 - HIV, AIDS, and STD Rm 3 - Traditional Medicine and Healing Rm 4 - Physicians for Social Responsibility Rm 5 - Family Systems Medicine Rm6 - Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Tuesday, May 21 8:00 am - 10:00 am Rm 1 - Ethics in Research Rm 2 - Diabetes in the North
  1 document  
Source
American Society for Circumpolar Health and the International Union for Circumpolar Health. 64 p. + insert.
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
7946679
Keywords
Circumpolar medicine Congresses
Documents
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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-805 PMID 23221918
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-46 PMID 18468265
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2002 Sep;66(9):1006-11 PMID 12374259
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007 Feb 11;7:7 PMID 17291355
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89 PMID 20862528
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2004 Mar;40(4):529-35 PMID 14962719
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
Cites: Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2013 Mar;12(3):191-204 PMID 23449306
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2011 May;117(5):1258-61 PMID 21508787
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1998 Jan;16(1):6-12 PMID 9440716
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2011 May;83(2):222-6 PMID 20580520
Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2015 Sep;23 (5):569-76 PMID 25471490
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness Strategic Action Plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294129
Source
Health Canada. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2007]
) Traditional and cultural ways of healing Improved communication, sharing of information Coordinated continuum of services Increase number of workers with appropriate mental health and addictions and cultural awareness training Reduce burnout and support existing staff (clinical supervision) Alianait
  1 document  
Author
Langlois, Kathy
Author Affiliation
Director General, Community Programs Directorate, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Source
Health Canada. 16 p.
Date
[2007]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2814930
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Mental health
First Nations
Inuits
Notes
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Documents

Kathy_Langlois__Strategic_Action_Plan-mental_wellness.pdf

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First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294130
Source
Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. v, 53 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
June 2011
; indigenous knowledge and traditional medicine; population health; environmental health; and health services delivery. C. Impact of jurisdictional issues on cancer control Participants attending the National Forum on First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control pointed to several categories of issues
  1 document  
Source
Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. v, 53 p.
Date
June 2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
5545973
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Cancer
Neoplasms
Community-based care
Health care
Jurisdiction
Documents

fnim-action-plan-cancer-control.pdf

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Evidence In-Sight : Engaging First Nation, Inuit and Métis families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294131
Source
Ontario Centre for Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health. 18 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 2015
respectfully with Indigenous communities. Organizational policies and procedures should explicitly support cultural healing and intervention strategies for Indigenous clients and their families.  It is important to have a whole-organization approach, embedding cultural safety practices for working with
  1 document  
Source
Ontario Centre for Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health. 18 p.
Date
September 2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
616135
Keywords
Canada
Humans
First Nations
Inuits
Métis
Documents

eis_fnim_family_engagement.pdf

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