Skip header and navigation

Refine By

604 records – page 1 of 31.

Culture is treatment: considering pedagogy in the care of Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143248
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Brenda L Green
Author Affiliation
Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, Community Development and Health Sciences, 1301 Central Avenue, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan S6V4W1, Canada. bgreen@firstnationsuniversity.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ceremonial Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Metaphysics
Sick Role
Social Support
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing - education
Abstract
This article presents an overview of culture as treatment, by recognizing the impact that culture has on treatment along with the specific rituals, customs, and meanings related to healing. Attention must be given to the Aboriginal heritage, including various concepts of metaphysics, spirituality, medicines, government, oral history, and language. A pedagogical underpinning of illness and healing is better cared for through cultural messaging and learning that is related to the complex historical legacy of Aboriginal societies, and therefore, culture provides important diverse contributions to current treatment and wellness programs.
PubMed ID
20506971 View in PubMed
Less detail

Urban Aboriginal mobility in Canada: examining the association with health care utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119728
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Dec;75(12):2420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marcie Snyder
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. marcie.snyder@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Dec;75(12):2420-4
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services - utilization
Human Migration
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Population Groups
Urban Population
Abstract
In recent decades, Indigenous peoples across the globe have become increasingly urbanized. Growing urbanization has been associated with high rates of geographic mobility between rural areas and cities, as well as within cities. In Canada, over 54 percent of Aboriginal peoples are urban and change their place of residence at a higher rate than the non-Aboriginal population. High rates of mobility may affect the delivery and use of health services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between urban Aboriginal peoples' mobility and conventional (physician/nurse) as well as traditional (traditional healer) health service use in two distinct Canadian cities: Toronto and Winnipeg. Using data from Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this analysis demonstrates that mobility is a significant predisposing correlate of health service use and that the impact of mobility on health care use varies by urban setting. In Toronto, urban newcomers were more likely to use a physician or nurse compared to long-term residents. This was in direct contrast to the effect of residency on physician and nurse use in Winnipeg. In Toronto, urban newcomers were less likely to use a traditional healer than long-term residents, indicating that traditional healing may represent an unmet health care need. The results demonstrate that distinct urban settings differentially influence patterns of health service utilization for mobile Aboriginal peoples. This has important implications for how health services are planned and delivered to urban Aboriginal movers on a local, and potentially global, scale.
PubMed ID
23078674 View in PubMed
Less detail

Wizards and scientists: the pharmacologic experience in the Middle Ages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219472
Source
Am J Nephrol. 1994;14(4-6):384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
F. Rossi
M. Mangrella
A. Loffreda
E. Lampa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Second University of Naples, Italy.
Source
Am J Nephrol. 1994;14(4-6):384-90
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Byzantium
Europe
History, Medieval
Humans
Magic - history
Medicine, Arabic - history
Medicine, Traditional - history
Mental Healing - history
Pharmacology - history
Phytotherapy - history
Abstract
During the Dark ages, Greco-Roman science survived in the eastern Roman Empire and the most important advances in pharmacology and pharmacy were made in Byzantium. As the Arab empires spread in the 7th and 8th centuries, they incorporated earlier learning, and the most important contribution of Arabic medical writers was probably the introduction of formularies to aid in the preparation of medicines. In turn, the later spread of Arabic knowledge to the West introduced little-known plants and fostered an interest in collecting and cultivating them, and also introduced the palatable dose forms preferred by the Arabic doctors. In the West, however, the Christian Church taught a doctrine of unquestioning faith, and despite the centers of learning, e.g. at Salerno, most ordinary people depended on the healing power of faith, religious relics and traditional folk medicine. Hydrology was also well developed in the Middle Ages. The formularia that survive describe many indigenous plants, but with few illustrations. Their gathering and preparation is generally guided by magic ceremonies and ritual, and plants often took their properties from their habitat, e.g. the wayside plantain was thought good for tired or wounded feet. Concepts of therapeutic plants were also influenced by alchemy and were linked to related metals and planets.
PubMed ID
7847474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incorporating traditional healing into an urban American Indian health organization: a case study of community member perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123131
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
William E Hartmann
Joseph P Gone
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. williaha@umich.edu
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Needs Assessment
Organizational Case Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Urban Health Services
Abstract
Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available for urban AI communities do not exist in the literature, this community-based project convened 4 focus groups consisting of 26 members of a midwestern urban AI community to better understand traditional healing practices of interest and how they might be integrated into the mental health and substance abuse treatment services in an Urban Indian Health Organization (UIHO). Qualitative content analysis of focus group transcripts revealed that ceremonial participation, traditional education, culture keepers, and community cohesion were thought to be key components of a successful traditional healing program. Potential incorporation of these components into an urban environment, however, yielded 4 marked tensions: traditional healing protocols versus the realities of impoverished urban living, multitribal representation in traditional healing services versus relational consistency with the culture keepers who would provide them, enthusiasm for traditional healing versus uncertainty about who is trustworthy, and the integrity of traditional healing versus the appeal of alternative medicine. Although these tensions would likely arise in most urban AI clinical contexts, the way in which each is resolved will likely depend on tailored community needs, conditions, and mental health objectives.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Aug;96(8):1478-8416571711
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;44(2):232-5717576727
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2009;60:525-4818729724
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2009 Aug;77(4):751-6219634967
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2010 Oct;45(12):1909-2920380555
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Mar;47(1-2):187-20221052824
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2012;8:131-6022149479
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2012 Jun;49(3-4):441-5321972010
Cites: Health Place. 2012 Sep;18(5):1025-3322763082
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;49(2):206-2222194346
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2003 Jan-Mar;35(1):85-812733763
Cites: Med Care. 2004 Jul;42(7):670-915213492
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 1978 Apr;6(2):137-46264147
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1995;6(3):1-228555350
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;162(9):1723-3216135633
Cites: Community Ment Health J. 2006 Dec;42(6):521-3517143732
PubMed ID
22731113 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous treatment for alcoholism: the case of Puerto Rican spiritism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241115
Source
Med Anthropol. 1984;8(4):246-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984

Caring for children, focusing on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266831
Source
Paediatr Child Health. 2015 Aug-Sep;20(6):293-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian Mitchell
Juliet R Guichon
Sam Wong
Source
Paediatr Child Health. 2015 Aug-Sep;20(6):293-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Two First Nations girls with leukemia received a significant amount of media attention in 2014 and 2015. In both cases, the parents refused to continue chemotherapy, the only proven effective treatment; they opted instead for a combination of traditional Aboriginal healing approaches and alternative therapies offered in a facility outside of the country. One child has died; the other relapsed and required chemotherapy to avoid death. Media reports were polarized, focusing either on the historical legacy of distrust felt by First Nations people when accessing health care, or the need for child protection services to intervene. One article in the Canadian Medical Association Journal focused on the legacy of mistrust and methods of countering it, but did not address the legal and ethical duties of physicians in such situations. The present commentary describes the events, responsibilities of professionals involved and a course of action for physicians when faced with similar circumstances.
PubMed ID
26435666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healing traditions: the mental health of aboriginal peoples in Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88036
Source
RC 451.5.I5 H43 2009
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
Source
RC 451.5.I5 H43 2009
Date
2009
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Native peoples
Mental health
Mental health services
Suicide
Resilience
Abstract
Chapter 2: Mental health and the indigenous peoples of Australia and New Zealand; Chapter 8: Suicide as a way of belonging: causes and consequences of cluster suicides; Part 3: Resilience: transformations of identity and community
Less detail

New native healing centre in Toronto opens eyes of non-native MDs who work there.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221856
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jan 15;148(2):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1993
Author
F. Lowry
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jan 15;148(2):270-2
Date
Jan-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
PubMed ID
8420666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cajun traditions and their impact on health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216505
Source
J Cult Divers. 1995;2(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M D Oriol
Source
J Cult Divers. 1995;2(1):27-30
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Emigration and Immigration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Louisiana
Transcultural Nursing - education - methods
Abstract
This article will explore food preparation and faith healing practices of contemporary Cajun culture. Decades of exile and oppression required the early Cajuns to make use of scarce resources as a means of survival. Although modern society offers technological advances and information that can lead to more positive health outcomes, this close-knit group of hearty individuals frequently chooses to leave many traditional practices unchanged. Health care practitioners must understand the beliefs and practices of the Cajun people in order to meet their health needs.
PubMed ID
7663898 View in PubMed
Less detail

Traditional Native healing. Alternative or adjunct to modern medicine?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217044
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
E M Zubek
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1923-31
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To ascertain the extent to which family physicians in British Columbia agree with First Nations patients' using traditional Native medicines.
Randomized cross-sectional survey.
Family medicine practices in British Columbia.
A randomized volunteer sample of 79 physicians from the registry of the BC Chapter of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Of 125 physicians contacted, 46 did not reply.
Physicians' demographic variables and attitudes toward patients' use of traditional Native medicines.
Respondents generally accepted the use of traditional Native medicines for health maintenance, palliative care, and the treatment of benign illness. More disagreement was found with its use for serious illnesses, both for outpatients and in hospital, and especially in intensive care. Many physicians had difficulty forming a definition of traditional Native medicine, and were unable to give an opinion on its health risks or benefits. A significant positive correlation appeared between agreement with the use of traditional Native medicines and physicians' current practice serving a large First Nations population, as well as with physicians' knowing more than five patients using traditional medicine.
Cooperation between traditional Native and modern health care systems requires greater awareness of different healing strategies, governmental support, and research to determine views of Native patients and healers.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Apr 1;136(7):695-63828923
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1982;16(21):1873-817178933
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1991;32(5):549-522017722
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Jan 2;326(1):61-41727068
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1991 Oct;41(351):425-71777299
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jan 15;148(2):270-28420666
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1980 Jan;10(1):55-617350261
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(2):177-813563559
Cites: Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Feb;14B(1):73-807394568
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1982;16(18):1611-77146938
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1982;16(21):1817-247178927
PubMed ID
7841824 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Sep;65(6):1260-73 PMID 17521791
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 May 12;17 (1):262 PMID 28499371
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):261-70 PMID 16871832
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-805 PMID 23221918
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 1999 Dec;13(4):483-505 PMID 10626277
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):113-28 PMID 17515251
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-8 PMID 11513933
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89 PMID 20862528
Cites: Forsch Komplementmed. 2007 Dec;14 Suppl 2:10-8 PMID 18219205
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 30;120(26):3160-1 PMID 11109364
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S40-6 PMID 20147663
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2015 Aug 18;15:288 PMID 26283420
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 1981 Sep;5(3):217-31 PMID 7318486
Cites: Ann Behav Sci Med Educ. 2008 Fall;14(2):56-61 PMID 26321860
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1423-33 PMID 7728691
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17 (1):530 PMID 29233186
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2006 Jun;20(3):223-34 PMID 16777790
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Apr;74(7):1029-36 PMID 22336733
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Aug 7;135(3):189-95 PMID 11487486
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Healing and Empowering Alaskan Lives Toward Healthy-Hearts (HEALTHH) Project: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for tobacco use and other cardiovascular risk behaviors for Alaska Native People.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292174
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2018 Jun 02; 71:40-46
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-02-2018
Author
Judith J Prochaska
Anna Epperson
Jordan Skan
Marily Oppezzo
Paul Barnett
Kevin Delucchi
Matthew Schnellbaecher
Neal L Benowitz
Author Affiliation
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: jpro@stanford.edu.
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2018 Jun 02; 71:40-46
Date
Jun-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases disproportionately affect Alaska Native (AN) people. Using telemedicine, this study aims to identify culturally-tailored, theoretically-driven, efficacious interventions for tobacco use and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk behaviors among AN people in remote areas.
Randomized clinical trial with two intervention arms: 1) tobacco and physical activity; 2) medication adherence and a heart-healthy AN diet.
Participants are N?=?300 AN men and women current smokers with high blood pressure or high cholesterol.
All participants receive motivational, stage-tailored, telemedicine-delivered counseling sessions at baseline and 3, 6, and 12?months follow-up; an individualized behavior change plan that is updated at each contact; and a behavior change manual. In Group 1, the focus is on tobacco and physical activity; a pedometer is provided and nicotine replacement therapy is offered. In Group 2, the focus is on medication adherence for treating hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia; a medication bag and traditional food guide are provided.
With assessments at baseline, 3, 6, 12, and 18?months, the primary outcome is smoking status, assessed as 7-day point prevalence abstinence, biochemically verified with urine anabasine. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, blood pressure and cholesterol, medication compliance, diet, multiple risk behavior change indices, and cost-effectiveness.
The current study has the potential to identify novel, feasible, acceptable, and efficacious interventions for treating the co-occurrence of CVD risk factors in AN people. Findings may inform personalized treatment and the development of effective and cost-effective intervention strategies for use in remote indigenous communities more broadly. Clinical Trial Registration # NCT02137902.
PubMed ID
29864548 View in PubMed
Less detail

The use of a water extract from the bark of Choerospondias axillaris in the treatment of second degree burns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34765
Source
Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 1996 Jun;30(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
D D Nguyen
N H Nguyen
T T Nguyen
T S Phan
V D Nguyen
M. Grabe
R. Johansson
G. Lindgren
N E Stjernström
T A Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, Vietnam-Sweden Hospital of Uong Bi, Vietnam.
Source
Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 1996 Jun;30(2):139-44
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bandages
Burns - drug therapy - therapy
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Trees
Vietnam
Wound Healing
Wound Infection - epidemiology
Abstract
Burns are common in Vietnam, and because of economic constraints and limited resources for the import of appropriate treatments, the health authorities are obliged to rely on traditional herbal remedies. It is therefore essential to evaluate current drugs, one of which is the water extract of the bark of the tree Choerospondias axillaris. It has been used for many years in the Vietnam-Sweden hospital at Uong Bi in northern Vietnam. We assessed the efficacy of the remedy in an open, randomised controlled clinical trial, in which 20 patients with second degree burns were treated with the extract of the Choerospondias axillaris and 19 with saline gauze. The mean healing time was significantly shorter for patients treated with Choerospondias axillaris (11 days) compared with patients treated with saline gauze (17 days) (p
PubMed ID
8815984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Traditional medical practices and medicinal plant usage on a Bahamian island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248518
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;2(2):177-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
R A Halberstein
A B Saunders
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;2(2):177-203
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Mortality
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal
Social Change
Abstract
The traditional medical system of a small Bahamian island is explored through a health survey of 83% of the population and an analysis of the activities and materials of the two main native health 'professionals'--the healing specialist and the 'herbalist'. The present findings suggest that the Bimini medical system has historically been efficacious in the treatment and management of many health problems on the island. Part of the success may be attributed to the resourceful utilization of indigenous medicinal plant species, several of which contain chemical substances that may be curatively effective against a number of diseases as claimed. In recent years the island has experienced a relatively smooth process of medical modernization including the increased availability of 'westernized' health care and the gradual supplementation of the herbal remedies by imported patent and prescription medications.
PubMed ID
710170 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Psychiatric services in New Caledonia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249430
Source
Ann Med Psychol (Paris). 1977 Nov;2(4):599-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1977
Author
R. Berthomieu
Source
Ann Med Psychol (Paris). 1977 Nov;2(4):599-605
Date
Nov-1977
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health services
New Caledonia
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Abstract
The author describes Psychiatric hositals and psychiatric practice in Nouvelle-Calédonie, with historical and modern datas. The indigenous traditional psychiatry (healing) of the melanesians (who are half of the total population) remains ill-known and separated of occidental modern medical practice.
PubMed ID
613892 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibacterial activity of some indigenous plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201258
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
D S Grierson
A J Afolayan
Author Affiliation
Botany Department, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The use of medicinal plants in the world, and especially in South Africa, contributes significantly to primary health care. This paper presents the findings of an initial survey of plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Ethnomedical information gathered from surveys at clinics, hospitals as well as interviews with traditional healers and rural dwellers has revealed that Grewia occidentalis, Polystichum pungens, Cheilanthes viridis and Malva parvifolia are the most commonly used plants for the treatment of wounds in the province. The methanol extracts of G. occidentalis, P. pungens and C. viridis showed significant inhibition against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, while the acetone extract of P. pungens inhibited the gram-positive bacteria only. Extracts from M. parvifolia did not show any antibacterial activity at 5.0 mg/ml. Generally, the antibacterial property of the plants appears to have justified their use for the treatment of wounds, which are contaminated through bacterial infection, in the province.
PubMed ID
10432215 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental health issues for Asian Americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201782
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jun;50(6):774-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K M Lin
F. Cheung
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Research Center on the Psychobiology of Ethnicity, Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance 90502, USA. linkeh@harbor2.humc.edu
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jun;50(6):774-80
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health
Complementary Therapies
Culture
Family - psychology
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychotherapy
Somatoform Disorders - ethnology
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
One of fastest-growing population groups in recent decades, Asian Americans represent a vastly diversified and rich mixture of cultures, languages, beliefs, and practices, many of which differ widely from those of European Americans. As immigrants, Asian Americans have experienced and continue to experience various emotional and behavioral problems. However, they tend to underuse existing services except those that are culturally appropriate and linguistically compatible. Misdiagnosis frequently occurs, and the existence of culture-bound syndromes points to a lack of precise correspondence between indigenous labels and established diagnostic categories. Due to Asian traditions of viewing the body and mind as unitary rather than dualistic, patients tend to focus more on physical discomforts than emotional symptoms, leading to an overrepresentation of somatic complaints. Traditional practices and healing methods are frequently used to alleviate distress both before and after patients and their family members approach the conventional mental health care system. Help seeking typically is a family venture. Asian patients respond well to highly structured therapeutic interventions such as those used in behavioral, cognitive, and interpersonal models. When applying pharmacotherapy, clinicians should pay attention to Asians' unique responses to psychotropics, especially in regard to dosage requirements and side effects. Research in this area as well as on other important issues is in the early stage of development.
PubMed ID
10375146 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pow-wowing: the Pennsylvania Dutch way to heal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202020
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1998 Dec;16(4):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
J. Offner
Author Affiliation
Temple University, USA.
Source
J Holist Nurs. 1998 Dec;16(4):479-86
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Christianity
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Germany - ethnology
Humans
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Mentors
Pennsylvania
Abstract
Since ancient times, Germanic tribes from the Palatine valley relied on faith healers, brauchers, when health problems developed. Several hundred years ago, brauchers immigrated to the New World with various Germanic religious sects. Cooperative, instructional meetings, or pow wows, between Native American medicine men and newly immigrated brauchers allowed the newcomers to learn about herbs and remedies indigenous to North America. The brauchers, now known as pow wowers, practice within Pennsylvania Dutch communities across the country, especially in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania region. A review of the literature explores the history and development of the Pennsylvania Dutch practice of pow-wowing.
PubMed ID
10347442 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Randall Sexton
Ellen Anne Buljo Stabbursvik
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, P.O. Box 6124, 9291, Tromsø, Norway. randallno@yahoo.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Population Groups
Shamanism
Abstract
There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today's tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today's changing global society.
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;45(7):607-1611056823
Cites: Am Psychol. 2002 Nov;57(11):962-7812564209
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):488-9720044966
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;42(2):295-31616114587
Cites: Eur J Hum Genet. 2007 Jan;15(1):115-2016985502
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;40(2):248-7712940648
PubMed ID
20862528 View in PubMed
Less detail

The therapist-spiritist training project in Puerto Rico: an experiment to relate the traditional healing system to the public health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245309
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):255-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980

604 records – page 1 of 31.