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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Community well being and infectious diseases among Alaska Native communities in the Chugach Region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2986
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Natives, many of whom continue to practice a measure of traditional subsis- tence hunting and gathering lifestyles. The assumed control of infectious diseases prevalent in the 1960s is now disappearing, particularly in cases of infec- tious diseases having long latency periods prior to detection
  1 document  
Author
Speier, T.L
Author Affiliation
Alaska Comprehensive and Specialized Evaluation Services (ACSES), University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Psychology, 99508, USA. antls1@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives
Attitude to Health
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infectious diseases
Interviews
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance abuse
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine how Native people of the Chugach Region of Alaska perceive their own communities' health and well being, particularly in regard to infectious diseases. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective focus group interview survey. METHODS: During September to December 1999, 12 focus groups were conducted in seven communities in the Chugach Region of Alaska with 97 participants. Using a set of eight questions, information gathered provided insights into the participants' health-related perceptions and provided previously nonexistent baseline data pertaining toTB and hepatitis. RESULTS: Participants showed a good working knowledge of common infectious diseases. There were misconceptions and a potential for increased knowledge in highly prevalent diseases, but more recently delineated infections in rural Alaska, e.g., respiratory syncvtial virus (RSV), Helicobacter pylori, and less prevalent diseases, e.g., Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The participants expressed a desire for further infectious disease information and dialogue. CONCLUSIONS: This process can be used to develop a risk assessment tool for medical and clinical providers' use in an effort to increase testing for such infectious diseases as HIV, TB, Hepatitis C, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In this case the authors also produced a STD prevention video for rural Alaska Natives, entitled, Summer Sun Winter Moon.
PubMed ID
11768448 View in PubMed
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