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Alaska Natives combating substance abuse and related violence through self-healing: A report for the people

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99506
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1999
  1 website  
Author
Segal, B
Burgess, D
DeGross, D
Hild, C
Saylor, B
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Date
June 1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acculturation
Alaska Natives
Alcohol and drug abuse
Co-morbid disorders
Cultural change
Cumulative stress
Fetal alcohol syndrome and effects
Inhalant abuse
Local option law
Non-Native community
Spiritualism in treatment
Substance abuse
Traditional healing
Violence
Prevention
Indians of North America
Eskimos
Abstract
For more than a decade, the Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) has sought to bring attention, understanding, and solutions to the problem of substance abuse and related violence among Alaska Natives. Progress has been made in some communities, but substance abuse continues to cause suffering, pain, death, and despair among many Alaska Native families. At the request of AFN, this report was undertaken to provide a basis for deriving effective, lasting solutions.
Notes
ALASKA RA448.5.I5 A43 1999
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Establishing best practices for Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99668
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sep-2004
.................................................................................. 5 III. Aging in One’s Community: Alaska Native Ways as Best Practices............................. 8 A. Traditional Ways........................................................................................................... 8 B. Community Healing Steps and Conditions
  1 document  
Author
Segal, B
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Social Welfare, University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aging
Alaska Natives
Best practice
Boarding schools
Community healing
Cultural framework
Cultural heritage
Elders
Healing journeys
Healing practices
Healthy relationships
Knowledge bearers
Self-determination
Self-worth
Traditional customs
Abstract
There are two ways to seek to establish best practices for Alaska Native Elders. The first represents an attempt to emulate documented practices chiefly established to provide services to non-indigenous people in the United States. This approach utilizes theories that have been developed for "mainstream USA" that are then applied to Alaska Natives. The second approach involves undertaking an understanding of the physical, sociocultural, and economic factors involved in the life of Alaska Native Elders. This method involves the development of innovative theories that represent the values of the people, which leads to novel practices that can result in establishing best practice procedures meaningful to the population to be served. This approach has been adopted in pursuing best practices for Alaska Native Elders.
Documents

yr1_3best-practices.pdf

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Establishing best practices for traditional people

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274197
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2010
the problems in one’s community, taking responsibility for or assuming ownership of the problems, and exerting self- determination to achieve individual and community healing. CAAS -- UAA 11 Best practice, as defined herein, represents “the utilization of traditional customs and healing
  1 document  
Author
Segal, B
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2010
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Notes
Presentation
Documents

segal_establishing-best-practices.pdf

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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
ills, and they recommend traditional ways of healing. The “cures” include learning one’s language and living according to the values of the ancestors. A woman from Bethel, Alaska said that a healthy family has many roots. To establish future generations, we must be physically well. She said, “If you
  1 document  
Author
Segal, B
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Social Welfare, University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acculturation stress
Alaska Natives
Alcohol consumption
Boarding schools
Caregiver stress
Elder Abuse
Historical trauma
Abstract
The fundamental premise of this report is that acculturation change and its effects over time on Alaska Natives has contributed to the emergence of elder abuse among Alaska Natives. It also stresses that there is a relationship among acculturation stress, substance abuse, and elder abuse. Of primary importance is the recognition of how cultural loss is interwoven with elder abuse. The discussion also stresses how cultural values and traditions are vital to the integrity of the Alaska Native Community, and the critical role that these values and traditions have in the health and welfare of the elders.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.