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The experience of indigenous traditional healing and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180998
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Sarcoma - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Indigenous traditional healing is an ancient, deeply rooted, complex holistic health care system practiced by indigenous people worldwide. However, scant information exists to explain the phenomenon of indigenous medicine and indigenous health. Even less is known about how indigenous healing takes place. The purpose of this study is to describe the meaning and essence of the lived experience of 4 indigenous people who have been diagnosed with cancer and have used indigenous traditional healing during their healing journey. The researcher used a qualitative phenomenological methodology to collect and analyze interview data. Interviews were conducted with 4 self-identified indigenous people, ages 49 to 61, from diverse tribes. Time since cancer diagnosis varied from 2 to 20 years; types of cancer included lung, prostate, sarcoma of the leg, and breast. Four themes and 2 subthemes emerged (1) receiving the cancer diagnosis (with subthemes of knowing something was wrong and hearing something was wrong), (2) seeking healing, (3) connecting to indigenous culture, and (4) contemplating life's future. This study demonstrates that 4 individuals with cancer integrated Western medicine and traditional healing to treat their cancer. This knowledge provides necessary data about the phenomena of being healed by indigenous healers. Such data may serve as an initial guide for health care professionals while interacting with indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Accordingly, traditional healing may be used to decrease health disparities.
PubMed ID
15035869 View in PubMed
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Traditional indigenous healing: Part I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179069
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
V S Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):141-9
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cultural Characteristics
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical
Nursing Methodology Research
Spirituality
Abstract
Traditional indigenous healing is widely used today, as it has been since time immemorial. This article describes the following areas in regards to traditional healing: (a) an explanation of indigenous peoples, (b) a definition of traditional indigenous healing, (c) a portrayal of traditional healers, (d) health within indigenous culture, (e) traditional healing techniques, (f) utilization of traditional healing, (g) how to find a traditional healer, and (h) comparing traditional healing principles with mainstream ways. It is important to have knowledge about this method of holistic healing so health care providers and nurses can integrate it into the health care for individuals and/or families that choose traditional indigenous healing.
PubMed ID
15279855 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156448
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Narration
United States
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
20666300 View in PubMed
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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156015
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Mythology - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
18649444 View in PubMed
Less detail

Respecting tribal traditions in research and publications: voices of five Native American nurse scholars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173647
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Jana Lauderdale
Lee Anne Nichols
Lillian Tom-Orme
C June Strickland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nursing Research
Professional Competence
Transcultural Nursing - standards
United States
Abstract
A dialogue with five Native American scholars provides insight into conducting research and publishing resulting manuscripts on Native American topics, specifically healing beliefs and practices. This information provides a means to develop sensitivity and create understanding about concerns held by Native Americans regarding sharing certain defined cultural information with those outside the culture. The article identifies salient tribal issues related to research, discusses perspectives important to tribal nations and Native individuals surrounding research, and supplies a base on which to formulate further discussions.
PubMed ID
16044622 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.