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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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Clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system: results from a prospective, multicenter, clinical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267569
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2015 Jun;36(5):834-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Robert Briggs
Andrew Van Hasselt
Michal Luntz
Marcos Goycoolea
Stina Wigren
Peter Weber
Henrik Smeds
Mark Flynn
Robert Cowan
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2015 Jun;36(5):834-41
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Conduction
Female
Hearing
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Mixed Conductive-Sensorineural - therapy
Hearing Loss, Unilateral - therapy
Hearing Tests
Humans
Magnetic Phenomena
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Speech Perception
Suture Anchors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the investigation was to prospectively evaluate, in a multicenter setting, the clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system.
The test device was the Cochlear Baha Attract System (Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB, Mölnlycke, Sweden). Instead of the skin-penetrating abutment of traditional bone conduction hearing implants, the test device uses an implantable and an external magnet to transmit sound from the sound processor (SP) through intact skin to the skull bone. Twenty-seven adult patients with a conductive or mild mixed hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness were included in the clinical investigation across four investigational sites. The patients were followed for 9 months after implantation. The study evaluated efficacy in terms of hearing performance compared with unaided hearing and with hearing with the SP on a softband. Patient benefit, soft tissue status, device retention, and safety parameters were monitored continuously throughout the investigation.
Surgery and healing was uneventful. Statistically significant improvements in audibility and speech understanding in noise and quiet were recorded for the test device compared with preoperative unaided hearing. Speech recognition was similar or better than tests performed with the same SP on a softband. Good soft tissue outcomes were reported, without major pressure-related complications. At the end of the investigation, all patients continued to use and benefit from the device.
The test device provides good hearing performance in patients with a conductive hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness, with good wearing comfort and minimal soft tissue complications.
PubMed ID
25634465 View in PubMed
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