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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system: results from a prospective, multicenter, clinical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267569
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2015 Jun;36(5):834-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Robert Briggs
Andrew Van Hasselt
Michal Luntz
Marcos Goycoolea
Stina Wigren
Peter Weber
Henrik Smeds
Mark Flynn
Robert Cowan
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2015 Jun;36(5):834-41
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Conduction
Female
Hearing
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Mixed Conductive-Sensorineural - therapy
Hearing Loss, Unilateral - therapy
Hearing Tests
Humans
Magnetic Phenomena
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Speech Perception
Suture Anchors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the investigation was to prospectively evaluate, in a multicenter setting, the clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system.
The test device was the Cochlear Baha Attract System (Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB, Mölnlycke, Sweden). Instead of the skin-penetrating abutment of traditional bone conduction hearing implants, the test device uses an implantable and an external magnet to transmit sound from the sound processor (SP) through intact skin to the skull bone. Twenty-seven adult patients with a conductive or mild mixed hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness were included in the clinical investigation across four investigational sites. The patients were followed for 9 months after implantation. The study evaluated efficacy in terms of hearing performance compared with unaided hearing and with hearing with the SP on a softband. Patient benefit, soft tissue status, device retention, and safety parameters were monitored continuously throughout the investigation.
Surgery and healing was uneventful. Statistically significant improvements in audibility and speech understanding in noise and quiet were recorded for the test device compared with preoperative unaided hearing. Speech recognition was similar or better than tests performed with the same SP on a softband. Good soft tissue outcomes were reported, without major pressure-related complications. At the end of the investigation, all patients continued to use and benefit from the device.
The test device provides good hearing performance in patients with a conductive hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness, with good wearing comfort and minimal soft tissue complications.
PubMed ID
25634465 View in PubMed
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