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Using traditional spirituality to reduce domestic violence within aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146235
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jan;16(1):89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Chassidy Puchala
Sarah Paul
Carla Kennedy
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jan;16(1):89-96
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Battered Women - psychology
Counseling
Criminals - psychology
Domestic Violence - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental health services
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Saskatchewan
Spirituality
Abstract
We report the results of involving traditional healing elders (THE) in the clinical care of aboriginal families who were involved in domestic violence in the context of a clinical case series of referrals made for domestic violence.
Psychiatric consultations were requested from senior author L.M.M. for 113 aboriginal individuals involved with domestic violence as recipients or perpetrators (or both) between July 2005 and October 2008. As part of their clinical care, all were encouraged to meet with a THE, with 69 agreeing to do so. The My Medical Outcomes Profile 2 scale was being used as a clinical instrument to document effectiveness. Elders used traditional cultural stories and aboriginal spirituality with individuals, couples, and families to transform the conditions underlying domestic violence.
For those people who met with the THE, a statistically significant change (p
PubMed ID
20055557 View in PubMed
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What traditional indigenous elders say about cross-cultural mental health training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153449
Source
Explore (NY). 2009 Jan-Feb;5(1):20-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. mehlmadrona@gmail.com
Source
Explore (NY). 2009 Jan-Feb;5(1):20-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arizona
Attitude to Health
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Health
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health
Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical
Rural Health
Spirituality
Abstract
Although a number of authors have commented on what mental health practitioners should be taught to be effective and appropriate with indigenous people, rarely have traditional healers been asked for their views. This paper explores what a diverse group of traditional healing elders believe are the important attributes for mental health providers to embrace and what principles they should adopt to guide their training. How indigenous people understand the meaning of mental health is also examined. The research presented was conducted in preparation for developing a cross-cultural training program for human service providers that would include traditional elders as community mentors and adjunct faculty on equal status with academically trained faculty. The goal is to identify and summarize the core values and principles needed to train mental health providers to work in harmony with traditional healers. The term indigenous used in this paper refers to people who have lived in a place long enough to develop local knowledge and practices about that place, even though they might not have been the original inhabitants. For example, the Dene in Arizona are indigenous even though they have only occupied that area from about 1100 ad. Last, the paper is presented in an indigenous way, first by situating the author, telling a story, explaining the methodology, describing the elders and what they said, and ending with a story to dramatize the conclusions as indigenous elders would do.
PubMed ID
19114260 View in PubMed
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Narrative analysis: Alternative constructions of bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162744
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2007;22(2):12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2007;22(2):12-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - therapy
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Narration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
In the conventional view of bipolar disorder, life-long treatment with pharmaceuticals is assumed. This paper presents an overview of 24 narratives from people in the author's practice who have successfully managed and thrived without pharmacological treatment. For comparison purposes, 24 patients who could not manage without medication (even though some tried) were selected from the author's practice and matched for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and years of illness. Comparisons between the stories reveal that recovery without medication requires more substantial life change than does management with medication. Such non-medicated recovery becomes an all-encompassing life project. The patients who follow this path make major life changes and maintain them. The worldview of non-medicated bipolar patients differs, in that their struggle for recovery provides them with meaning and purpose, which is, in itself, healing. These patients avoid health practitioners who would criticize their alternative approach. They are compared to patients who do not manage well without medication who nevertheless try to manage their condition with herbs or vitamins or other alternative therapies and are unable to do so. Accurate appraisal of illness versus denial of illness emerges as the guiding theme. It may be important to recognize a successful strategy for living without medication compared with strategies of denial or flights into herbs and/or vitamins that will ultimately not succeed. Indigenous (or aboriginal) people, in particular, may reject the conventional psychiatric model in favor of a more holistic approach more congruent with their cultural healing paradigms.
PubMed ID
20664123 View in PubMed
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From benzos to berries: treatment offered at an Aboriginal youth solvent abuse treatment centre relays the importance of culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101843
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Colleen Anne Dell
Maureen Seguin
Carol Hopkins
Raymond Tempier
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Debra Dell
Randy Duncan
Karen Mosier
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. colleen.dell@usask.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):75-83
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Culture
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental health
Solvents
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
First Nations and Inuit youth who abuse solvents are one of the most highly stigmatized substance-abusing groups in Canada. Drawing on a residential treatment response that is grounded in a culture-based model of resiliency, this article discusses the cultural implications for psychiatry's individualized approach to treating mental disorders. A systematic review of articles published in The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry during the past decade, augmented with a review of Canadian and international literature, revealed a gap in understanding and practice between Western psychiatric disorder-based and Aboriginal culture-based approaches to treatment and healing from substance abuse and mental disorders. Differing conceptualizations of mental health and substance abuse are discussed from Western psychiatric and Aboriginal worldviews, with a focus on connection to self, community, and political context. Applying an Aboriginal method of knowledge translation-storytelling-experiences from front-line workers in a youth solvent abuse treatment centre relay the difficulties with applying Western responses to Aboriginal healing. This lends to a discussion of how psychiatry can capitalize on the growing debate regarding the role of culture in the treatment of Aboriginal youth who abuse solvents. There is significant need for culturally competent psychiatric research specific to diagnosing and treating First Nations and Inuit youth who abuse substances, including solvents. Such understanding for front-line psychiatrists is necessary to improve practice. A health promotion perspective may be a valuable beginning point for attaining this understanding, as it situates psychiatry's approach to treating mental disorders within the etiology for Aboriginal Peoples.
Notes
RefSource: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):73-4
PubMed ID
21333034 View in PubMed
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Narratives of exceptional survivors who work with aboriginal healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156629
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jun;14(5):497-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Canada. narrativemedicine@gmail.com
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jun;14(5):497-504
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anecdotes as Topic
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Social Support
Spirituality
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The commonalities are described of 47 people who sought traditional aboriginal healers for help with their cancer. All had 10% or less chance of survival at 5 years given the site and stage of their cancer from actuarial table calculations.
The subjects were compared to a similar group of people who were also working with aboriginal healers and who did not survive past 5 years. Narratives were obtained from the people before and after their work with the healer. These stories were enriched through interviews with family members, friends, health care providers, and the healers themselves, whenever possible. Panels of naïve medical students, graduate students, patients, and health care providers were used to evaluate the stories and to pick themes that consistently emerged (dimension analysis). Once stable dimensions emerged, scenarios were developed to rate patients along these dimensions from "1" to "5." New panels did the ratings, with at least 3 panels of 3 people per narrative. Comparisons were made between these 2 groups of people, and differences emerged on the dimensions of Present-centeredness; Forgiveness of others; Release of blame, bitterness, and chronic anger; Orientation to process versus outcome; Sense of Humor; Refusal to accept death as immediate prognosis; Plausible (to the patient, his or her family, and the healers) explanation for why he or she got well, including a story reflecting a belief about how he or she can stay well; Supportive community who believes in the person's cure and protects the person from outsiders who think the person will die; People experience a quantum change, in which major improvements in self-esteem and quality of relationships occurs; and Spiritual transformation.
The 2 groups of people reported equal increases on the dimensions of Sense of Meaning and Purpose and Faith and Hope, which may be intrinsic to the style of healing of aboriginal elders.
PubMed ID
18564954 View in PubMed
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Relationships between level of spiritual transformation and medical outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117002
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2013;27(1):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Barbara Mainguy
Michael Valenti Pickren
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2013;27(1):4-11
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - ethnology - therapy
Canada
Child
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Quality of Life
Spiritual Therapies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Culturally defined healers operate in most of the world, and to various degrees, blend traditional healing practices with those of the dominant religion in the region. They practice more or less openly and more or less in conjunction with science-based health professionals. Nonindigenous peoples are seeking out these healers more often, especially for conditions that carry dire prognoses, such as cancer, and usually after science-based medicine has failed. Little is known about the medical outcomes of people who seek Native North American healing, which is thought by its practitioners to work largely through spiritual means.
This study explored the narratives produced through interviews and writings of people working with traditional Aboriginal healers in Canada to assess the degree of spiritual transformation and to determine whether a relationship might exist between that transformation and subsequent changes in medical outcome.
Before and after participation in traditional healing practices, participants were interviewed within a narrative inquiry framework and also wrote stories about their lives, their experiences of working with traditional healers, and the changes that the interactions produced. The current study used a variety of traditional healers who lived in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.
Urban and Rural Reserves of the Canadian Prairie Provinces.
One hundred fifty non-Native individuals requested help from Dr Mehl-Madrona in finding traditional Aboriginal healing and spiritual practitioners and agreed to participate in this study of the effects of their work with the healers.
The healers used methods derived from their specific cultural traditions, though all commonly used storytelling, These methods included traditional Aboriginal ceremonies and sweat lodge ceremonies, as well as other diagnosing ceremonies, such as the shaking tent among the Ojibway or the yuwipi ceremony of the Dakota, Nakota, and Lakota, and sacred-pipe-related practices.
The research team used a combination of grounded theory modified from a critical constructivist point of view and narrative analysis to rate the degree of spiritual transformation experienced. Medical outcome was measured by a 5-point Likert scale and was confirmed with medical practitioners and other family members.
A 5-year follow-up revealed that 44 of the reports were assessed as showing profound levels of persistent spiritual transformation, defined as a sudden and powerful improvement in the spiritual dimension of their lives. The level of spiritual transformation achieved through interaction with healers was associated in a doseresponse relationship with subsequent improvement in medical illness in 134 of 155 people (P
PubMed ID
23341417 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.