Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
Less detail

From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298090
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Allostasis
Culture
Emotions
Ethnic groups - history
Health
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Music - history
Resilience, Psychological
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Singing
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290827
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):37-45 PMID 21329576
Cites: Front Psychol. 2017 Apr 03;8:501 PMID 28421017
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Nov 22;72:21813 PMID 24282785
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Aug 08;75:31697 PMID 27507149
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Jul 9;388(10040):131-57 PMID 27108232
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):231-7 PMID 22686451
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2011;4:null PMID 22007156
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):651-72 PMID 24846701
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013 Aug 07;8:20635 PMID 23930991
Cites: Perm J. 2012 Winter;16(1):19-27 PMID 22529755
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):97-113 PMID 18468262
Cites: J R Soc Promot Health. 2001 Dec;121(4):248-56 PMID 11811096
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 May 29;13:522 PMID 23718264
Cites: J Music Ther. 2013 Fall;50(3):198-242 PMID 24568004
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1956 Nov 1;76(21):815-6 PMID 13380863
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23971013
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2003 Aug 1;54(3):200-7 PMID 12893096
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Jul;55(7):696-710 PMID 12160918
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Nov 05;12:948 PMID 23127197
Cites: Music Percept. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):287-295 PMID 21152359
Cites: J Psychol. 2014 Nov-Dec;148(6):641-57 PMID 25175888
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Jan;74(1):25125 PMID 28417798
Cites: Cogn Emot. 2012;26(3):550-60 PMID 21902567
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015 Oct;60:82-90 PMID 26142566
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1271590 PMID 28452679
Cites: J Parkinsons Dis. 2016 Jun 3;6(3):473-84 PMID 27258698
Cites: Gerontologist. 2014 Aug;54(4):634-50 PMID 24009169
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Dec 28;(12):CD006577 PMID 24374731
Cites: J Hypertens. 1986 Dec;4(6):687-97 PMID 3546493
Cites: Prog Brain Res. 1977;47:263-76 PMID 928750
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Aug;43(6):588-96 PMID 25969164
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 1986 Jul;62(729):687-93 PMID 3748938
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1993 Sep 27;153(18):2093-101 PMID 8379800
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1956 Nov 15;76(22):867-71 PMID 13380871
Cites: Patient Prefer Adherence. 2014 May 16;8:727-54 PMID 24876768
PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail