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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Cross cultural training considerations in AIDS education for First Nations health workers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102277
Source
Pages 699-703 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
healing, cultural, traditional values . F amework for In designing the AIDS Educanon r . . g Training it was realized that HN/AIDS .tnll;"1 could not stand alone, that it needed to be inc %; rated into the wider notion of learners em~~­ themselves to choose healthier lifestyles. In 1 xt. ing
  1 document  
Author
Devlin, R.E
Author Affiliation
Medical Services Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Source
Pages 699-703 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adult education
AIDS education
Cross-cultural training
First Nations
Health workers
HIV
Abstract
Health care professionals can make a positive contribution to the empowerment, self-esteem, and sexual decision-making by clients through adult education teaching strategies which support choices for healthy, informed decisions about AIDS and sexuality. The purpose of AIDS training for First Nations health care workers was to become knowledgeable and skilled in the design and implementation of training for their communities with specific focus on education of Chief and council, eiders, and youth; and that trainees would increase their comfort, skill, and self-esteem levels when facilitating the sensitive issues of human sexuality. A five-day training session was held emphasizing adult education process skills; the second five-day session focused on HIV/AIDS content. Trainees had an opportunity to facilitate their workshop, which included concepts such as basic AIDS knowledge, condom education, human sexuality, refusal skills, homophobia, and traditional values and beliefs. Experiential group process and cross-cultural skills utilized by the training team provided an effective method for attitude change.
Documents
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Suicide prevention training for aboriginal young adults with learning disabilities from fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102352
Source
Pages 564-579 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
addiction 6012001 561 InteTnational Journal of Circumpular Healib Mental diseases and addiction 60 I 200 I Vi s i o n Q_u e s t FNESS is in partnership with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in establishing, fundraising and building an ad- dictions recovery and healing centre on
  1 document  
Author
Devlin, R.E
Author Affiliation
Community Programs Trainer, First Nations Emergency Services Society, Vancouver, Canada
Source
Pages 564-579 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Emergency services
FAE
FAS
Fetal alcohol effects
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
First Nations
FNESS
Health care professionals
Prevention programs
Suicide prevention
Training
Young adults
Abstract
This paper attempts to address some of the issues facing all who work and support young adults living with FAS/FAE, whose dreams and goals parallel our own. Firstly, it is important to recognize the characteristics and understand the common factors, which are part of the developmental process. Secondly, we will review certain literature to discover what others have accomplished in defining strategies for facilitators, trainers, and teachers. Finally, we will focus on some of our experiences with young adults affected by FAS/FAE brought about through our work with the First Nations Emergency Services Society (FNESS).
Documents
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