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Utilizing drumming for American Indians/Alaska Natives with substance use disorders: a focus group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121175
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):505-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Daniel Dickerson
Francis Robichaud
Cheryl Teruya
Kathleen Nagaran
Yih-Ing Hser
Author Affiliation
Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) , Los Angeles, CA 90025–7535, USA. daniel.dickerson@ucla.edu
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):505-10
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Middle Aged
Music Therapy - methods
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Drumming has been utilized among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes for centuries to promote healing and self-expression. Drum-Assisted Recovery Therapy for Native Americans (DARTNA), currently under development, is a substance abuse treatment utilizing drumming as a core component.
Focus groups were conducted to assist in the development of the DARTNA protocol. Feedback obtained from these focus groups will inform a subsequent pretest of DARTNA and an empirical study analyzing its effectiveness.
Three focus groups were conducted among AIs/ANs with substance use disorders (n = 6), substance abuse treatment providers (n = 8), and a community advisory board (n = 4) to solicit feedback prior to a pretest of the DARTNA protocol.
Overall, participants indicated that DARTNA could be beneficial for AIs/ANs with substance use disorders. Four overarching conceptual themes emerged across the focus groups: (1) benefits of drumming, (2) importance of a culture-based focus, (3) addressing gender roles in drumming activities, and (4) providing a foundation of common AI/AN traditions.
The DARTNA protocol is a potentially beneficial and culturally appropriate substance abuse treatment strategy for AIs/ANs. In order to optimize the potential benefits of a substance abuse treatment protocol utilizing drumming for AIs/ANs, adequate attention to tribal diversity and gender roles is needed.
Due to the shortage of substance abuse treatments utilizing traditional healing activities for AIs/ANs, including drumming, results from this study provide an opportunity to develop an intervention that may meet the unique treatment needs of AIs/ANs.
Notes
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):251-6016757664
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2008;43(12-13):1927-4919016172
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;31(4):499-52617955349
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 2006 Jun;20(2):160-8116770909
PubMed ID
22931086 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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