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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
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Human health implications of environmental contaminants in Arctic Canada: A review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4526
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
]. The primary exposure pathway for contaminants for various organochlorines (OCs) and toxic metals is through the traditional northern diet. Exposures tend to be higher in the eastern than the western Canadian Arctic. In recent dietary surveys among five Inuit regions, mean intakes by 20- to 40-year
  1 document  
Author
Van Oostdam, J
Gilman, A
Dewailly, E
Usher, P
Wheatley, B
Kuhnlein, H
Neve, S
Walker, J
Tracy, B
Feeley, M
Jerome, V
Kwavnick, B
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Bureau of Chemical Hazards, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-82
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
5360239
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Public Health
Risk factors
Abstract
This paper assesses the impact on human health of exposure to current levels of environmental contaminants in the Canadian Arctic, and identifies the data gaps that need to be filled by future human health research and monitoring. The concept of health in indigenous groups of the Arctic includes social, cultural, and spiritual dimensions. The harvesting, sharing and consumption of traditional foods are an integral component to good health among Aboriginal people influencing both physical health and social well-being. Traditional foods are also an economic necessity in many communities. Consequently, the contamination of country food raises problems which go far beyond the usual confines of public health and cannot be resolved by health advisories or food substitutions alone. The primary exposure pathway for the contaminants considered in this paper is through the traditional northern diet. For the Inuit, the OCs of primary concern at this time from the point of view of exposure are chlordane, toxaphene, and PCBs. Exposures are higher in the eastern than in the western region of the North. For Dene/Metis, exposure to OCs is in general below a level of concern. However, estimated intake of chlordane and toxaphene has been found to be elevated for certain groups and is a cause for concern if exposures are elevated on a regular basis. The developing foetus and breast-fed infant are likely to be more sensitive to the effects of OCs and metals than individual adults and are the age groups at greatest risk in the Arctic. Extensive sampling of human tissues in the Canadian north indicate that a significant proportion of Dene, Cree and Inuit had mean maternal hair mercury levels within the 5% risk-range proposed by the WHO for neonatal neurological damage. Based on current levels, lead does not appear to pose a health threat while cadmium is likely only a major risk factor for heavy smokers or consumers of large amounts of organ meats. Consumers of traditional foods are exposed to an approximately seven-fold higher radiation dose than non-consumers of traditional foods due predominantly to the bioaccumulation of natural radionuclides in the food chain. Risk determination for contaminants in country food involves a consideration of the type and amounts of food consumed and the sociocultural, nutritional, economic, and spiritual benefits associated with country foods. Risk management options that minimize the extent to which nutritional and sociocultural aspects of Aboriginal societies are compromised must always be considered.
PubMed ID
10466227 View in PubMed
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