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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
Less detail

"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287106
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Sep;65(6):1260-73 PMID 17521791
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 May 12;17 (1):262 PMID 28499371
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Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Aug 7;135(3):189-95 PMID 11487486
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and associations for use of a traditional medicine provider in the SAMINOR 1 Survey: a population-based study on Health and Living Conditions in Regions with Sami and Norwegian Populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287589
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17(1):530
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2017
Author
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Marita Melhus
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17(1):530
Date
Dec-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional medicine (TM) is shaped by both Christianity and traditional Sami nature worship. The healing rituals may include prayer and the use of tools such as moss, water, stones, wool and soil. Examples of TM modalities offered is cupping, blood-stemming, laying on of hands, healing prayers, and rituals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the use of TM in areas with predominantly Sami and Norwegian populations, and the influence of ethnicity, geography, gender, age, education, household income, religiosity and self-reported health on such use.
The study is based on data collected in the first SAMINOR Survey (SAMINOR 1) conducted in 2003/2004, including three self-administered questionnaires, clinical measures, and blood analyses. Data was collected in 24 municipalities in Norway known to have a substantial population of Sami. All residents aged 30 and 36-78/79 years in the predefined regions were invited regardless of ethnic background (N?=?27,987). Of these, 16,865 (60.3%) accepted to participate and gave their consent to medical research.
Of the 16,544 people responding to the question about TM use, 2276 (13.8%) reported to have used TM once or more during their lifetime. The most outstanding characteristic of the TM users was the affiliation to the Laestadian church, where 34.3% (n?=?273) reported such use, followed by an inner Finnmark residence (31.1%, n?=?481) and a Sami ethnicity (25.7%, n?=?1014). Women were slightly more likely to use TM compared to men (15.9% and 11.5% accordingly, p?
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):261-7016871832
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Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012 Jan 12;12:122240073
PubMed ID
29233186 View in PubMed
Less detail

From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.