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Source
Aboriginal Healing Foundation. 110 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
The Iceberg Healing Manual Written by: Pangnirtung, NU It should be noted that the text of this book has been directly translated into English from Meeka Arnakaq’s compilation of her traditional teachings, handwritten in Inuktitut syllabics. Its content and sentence structure have been
  1 document  
Author
Arnakaq, Meeka
Source
Aboriginal Healing Foundation. 110 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
7049111
Keywords
Inuk
Nunavut
Traditional healing
Mental health
Documents

The_Iceberg_Healing_Manual.pdf

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Discrimination and participation in traditional healing for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112532
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Jacquelene F Moghaddam
Sandra L Momper
Timothy Fong
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, jacquelene@post.harvard.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Female
Great Lakes Region - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine, Traditional - utilization
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Discrimination - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Contemporary American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) who live in urban areas today face the daunting task of navigating an urban landscape while maintaining the facets of their respective Native cultures. While AIs/ANs continue to grapple with the intergenerational trauma associated with forced assimilation, relocation movements, and boarding schools, these traumas have manifested themselves in elevated rates of psychopathology. AIs/ANs have elevated rates of domestic abuse, poverty, suicide, and substance misuse. Furthermore, AIs/ANs, like many other minority cultures often face discrimination in their everyday lives. In light of the aversive experiences they face, AI/AN people have followed the tenets of ritual and traditional healing to address imbalances in the body, mind, and spirit. For providers working with AI/AN clients, it is important to understand who is using traditional healing and why they are using alternative services. Secondary data analyses of survey data from 389 urban AIs/ANs were utilized in order to determine the relationship between experiences of discrimination and traditional healing use. Analyses indicated that experiences of discrimination in healthcare settings were significantly associated with participation in traditional healing. Analyses also indicated that nearly a quarter of the sample reported discrimination in a healthcare setting, roughly half of the sample had used traditional healing, and that the majority of those who had used traditional healing were women, and ages 35-44 (27%). This study calls attention to the socio-demographic factors implicated in traditional healing use by urban AI/AN people, in addition to the clinical and demographic characteristics of this sample.
PubMed ID
23821254 View in PubMed
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Traditional Healing among the Inupiaq: Importance of Caring for the Body, Mind, and Spirit

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288560
Source
2nd International Telehealth Symposium on Palliative Care, Anchorage, Alaska. 14 slides.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
27 April 2010
TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG THE INUPIAQ: IMPORTANCE OF CARING FOR THE BODY, MIND, AND SPIRIT Carl M. Hild, PhD, MS Associate Professor Director, Health Services Administration Program Business Administration Department Alaska Pacific University 27 April 2010 2nd International Telehealth
  1 document  
Author
Hild, Carl M.
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Director, Health Services Administration Program, Business Administration Department, Alaska Pacific University
Source
2nd International Telehealth Symposium on Palliative Care, Anchorage, Alaska. 14 slides.
Date
27 April 2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
PowerPoint (.ppt)
File Size
358071
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Health & Wellness
Our Stories
Alaska
Palliative Care
Telemedicine
Patient Comfort
Documents

Hild_TraditionalHealingPowerpoint.pdf

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Geographical access and the substitution of traditional healing for biomedical services in two American Indian tribes

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260198
Source
Medical care. v. 50. no. 10. p. 877
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Special section: Indigenous peoples: Promoting psychological healing and well-being

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274315
Date
Aug-2010
  1 website  
Author
Office of Ethnic Minority Affairs, American Psychological Association
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Keywords
Beliefs
Cultural competence
Education
Indigenous peoples
Mental health
Spirituality
Traditional healing
Abstract
Collectively, these articles are broad in scope, describing a panorama of indigenous cultures throughout the Americas and the Caribbean and their approaches to healing and well-being. Among the indigenous groups addressed are Alaska Natives, American Indians, Arawaks, Chamorros of Guam, First Nations people of Canada, Haitians, Latinos of Cuba, and others. Equally as varied are the specific topical foci of the articles. But what is most striking is the communality of themes and concerns across the various articles and cultural groups, and the differences between these communalities and major thematic concerns of Western (U.S.) psychology.
Online Resources
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Incorporating traditional healing into an urban American Indian health organization: a case study of community member perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123131
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
William E Hartmann
Joseph P Gone
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043, USA. williaha@umich.edu
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):542-54
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Needs Assessment
Organizational Case Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - rehabilitation
Urban Health Services
Abstract
Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available for urban AI communities do not exist in the literature, this community-based project convened 4 focus groups consisting of 26 members of a midwestern urban AI community to better understand traditional healing practices of interest and how they might be integrated into the mental health and substance abuse treatment services in an Urban Indian Health Organization (UIHO). Qualitative content analysis of focus group transcripts revealed that ceremonial participation, traditional education, culture keepers, and community cohesion were thought to be key components of a successful traditional healing program. Potential incorporation of these components into an urban environment, however, yielded 4 marked tensions: traditional healing protocols versus the realities of impoverished urban living, multitribal representation in traditional healing services versus relational consistency with the culture keepers who would provide them, enthusiasm for traditional healing versus uncertainty about who is trustworthy, and the integrity of traditional healing versus the appeal of alternative medicine. Although these tensions would likely arise in most urban AI clinical contexts, the way in which each is resolved will likely depend on tailored community needs, conditions, and mental health objectives.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22731113 View in PubMed
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The use of traditional healing practices to address AI/AN historical trauma and disparities in behavioral health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294082
Source
Washington, DC: National Council of Urban Indian Health. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
The Use of Traditional Healing Practices to Address AI/AN Historical Trauma and Disparities in Behavioral Health National Council of Urban Indian Health (2018) This paper was prepared by Nikija Shuman, MS
  1 document  
Author
Shuman, N.
Source
Washington, DC: National Council of Urban Indian Health. 11 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
342548
Keywords
Indians, North American
Alaska
Behavioral health
Traditional healing
Substance abuse
Documents

NCUIH_2018_Position_Paper_on_Use_of_Traditional_Healing_Practices.pdf

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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287106
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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Community Voices: Integrating traditional healing services for urban American Indians/Alaska Natives in Los Angeles County: Learning collaborative summary report, February 2012

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259977
Source
Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dickerson,DL
Johnson,CL
Castro,C.
Naswood,E.
Leon,JMP
Source
Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health.
Date
2012
Publication Type
Article
Less detail

Achieving balance: healing in native art.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116074
Source
J Physician Assist Educ. 2012;23(4):47-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa K Walker
Author Affiliation
Franklin Pierce University, West Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
Source
J Physician Assist Educ. 2012;23(4):47-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Art
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Nature
Abstract
It has been my great fortune to have spent this past summer traveling across North America with my husband. We left our home state of New Hampshire in June and, in late July, arrived in the 49th state, Alaska, where we have settled in for the winter. From Manitoulin Island and the shores of Lake Huron to the Black Hills of South Dakota and on through the Canadian Rockies, we traveled through a number of North American Native communities. It is this experience and my recent introduction to Alaskan Native culture and peoples that are the impetus for this feature, where I will explore the historical and re-emerging use of art to promote health and healing in Native communities.
PubMed ID
23437624 View in PubMed
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Johan Turi's animal, mineral, vegetable cures and healing practices: an in-depth analysis of Sami (Saami) folk healing one hundred years ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108063
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2013;9:57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Thomas A DuBois
Jonathan F Lang
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA. tadubois@wisc.edu
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2013;9:57
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anura
Ethnobotany
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional - history
Minerals - therapeutic use
Moxibustion
Organotherapy
Phytotherapy
Population Groups
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
The healing knowledge of a Sami (Saami) hunter and reindeer herder was surveyed as a window into the concepts of health, healing, and disease in early twentieth-century Sapmi (Northern Sweden). The two books of Johan Turi (1854-1936)--An Account of the Sami (1910) and Lappish Texts (1918-19) were examined to determine the varieties of recorded zootherapeutic, mineral, chemical, and ethnobotanical lore, as well as the therapeutic acts, identified conditions, and veterinary knowledge included.
Tabulation of the materials and species mentioned in Turi's descriptions (n?=?137) permitted analysis of the relative frequency of differing types of healing in Turi's overall therapeutic repertoire, his relative attention to chronic vs. acute ailments, and the frequency of magic as a component of healing. A qualitative appraisal was made of the degree to which outside influences affected Sami healing of the period. A further assessment of the possible clinical efficacy of the recorded remedies was undertaken.
Turi's remedies consist most often of zootherapeutics (31%), followed by physical acts such as massage, moxibustion, or manipulation (22%). Ethnobotanical cures make up a significantly smaller portion of his repertoire (17%), followed by mineral and chemical cures (12%). Magic rituals (including incantations and ritual acts) make up a significant portion of Turi's repertoire, and could be used alone (17%) or in conjunction with other types of healing (38%). Turi's healing aimed primarily at acute ailments (65%), with chronic conditions addressed less often (35%). A literature review revealed that Turi's remedies held a marked frequency of likely efficacy, at least in cases in which it was possible to ascertain the precise species, conditions, or substances described. Although it is possible at times to recognize foreign sources in Turi's repertoire, it is clear that Turi understood all his healing methods as distinctively Sami.
The research illustrates the variety and depth of a single informant's healing knowledge, and demonstrates the value of both historical sources and in-depth data collection with single experts as useful means of assessing and characterizing an indigenous population's healing traditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23941666 View in PubMed
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Pathway to Hope: an indigenous approach to healing child sexual abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107718
Source
Pages 534-540 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):534-540
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
holding offenders accountable. Keywords: indigenous; historical trauma; maltreatment; sexual abuse; multigenerational; genocide; traditional; healing CQ\C-~ION P athway to Hope (PTH) is an indigenous approach to ending silence and denial related to child sexual abuse and encourages
  1 document  
Author
Diane Payne
Kimber Olson
Jared W Parrish
Author Affiliation
Justice for Native Children, Chugiak, Alaska 99567-0818, USA. justice4nativechildren@gmail.com
Source
Pages 534-540 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):534-540
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Medicine, Traditional - methods - psychology
Abstract
The Alaska Native (AN) population has endured multiple historical traumatic events. This population has poorer health outcomes on nearly all factors compared with Alaska non-Natives with more than 75% reportedly being physically assaulted in their lifetime, and child sexual abuse nearly 6 times the national average.
This article describes the Pathway to Hope (PTH) program, which is an indigenous approach to ending silence and denial related to child sexual abuse and encourages multigenerational healing.
PTH was developed by ANs who believe that each community is unique, thus strategies for ending denial and support for healing must be woven from the historical context, cultural strengths of individual communities. Strengths-based solutions built on truth, honesty, compassion and shared responsibility for healing and protecting today's children have been profound and successful. The PTH curriculum addresses child sexual abuse from a historical perspective; that the higher rates of sexual abuse among certain Tribes, regions and communities is linked in part to years of victimisation, but may also be perpetuated by internalised oppression and lateral violence among Tribal members.
Data suggest that community-based dialogue and wisdom of Native elders and spiritual leaders paired with readiness of community service providers are necessary for sustained change. At all levels, this Indigenous model for learning, sharing, helping and healing brings hope for an end to denial and silence about child sexual abuse for Native people.
The PTH program utilises the wisdom and values that have sustained Native people for generations. Ending silence and denial about child sexual abuse and building upon strengths have assisted many Indigenous communities begin the journey toward wellness. Through the PTH, communities have taken steps to accept the challenges associated with establishing safety for children, supporting child victims in healing and to holding offenders accountable.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984282 View in PubMed
Documents
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Ethnocultural aspects of PTSD: An overview of concepts, issues, and treatments

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102028
Source
Traumatology. 2010 Dec;16(4) 17-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Marsella, AJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii
Source
Traumatology. 2010 Dec;16(4) 17-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cultural competence
Culture
Ethnocultural variations
Healing
Healing principles
PTSD
Traditional healers
Trauma
Abstract
The present article offers an overview discussion of ethnocultural aspects of PTSD, with special attention to major conceptual issues, clinical considerations, and therapy practices. The historical circumstances leading to the widespread acceptance of PTSD among conventional mental health professionals, and the subsequent criticisms that emerged from scholars, humanitarian workers, and ethnocultural minorities are presented as an important background to the current controversial status of the concept, especially with regard to arguments regarding the ethnocultural determinants of PTSD. The concept of culture, its definition, and its developmental socialization process, are presented as foundations for understanding the many influences cultural variables have on the perception, experience, clinical expressions, and treatment responses to trauma. A "trauma event-person ecology" model identifies the different factors that serve to shape the outcome of trauma within and across cultures. A therapy outcome equation is presented that summarizes the complex calculus of variables and considerations impacting different outcomes. The many healing principles used by different Western and traditional approaches are also identified, calling attention to the importance of fitting patient to therapist to therapy to present and past circumstances. The article concludes that in spite of what appears to be common neurological processes, correlates, and consequences in the initial response to trauma exposure, ethnocultural variables exercise major influence on perceived causes, symptom manifestations, clinical parameters (i.e., onset, course, and outcome), interventions, and societal responses.
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First Nations traditional models of wellness--Environmental scan in British Columbia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99671
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
  1 website  
Author
First Nations Health Society
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural healing
Data Collection
Elders
Health programs
Knowledge-keepers
Shared wisdom
Traditional healers
Traditional knowledge
Traditional medicines
Traditional practices
Traditional wellness
Abstract
In September 2009, the FN Health Society on behalf of the First Nations Health Council conducted an environmental scan to gather information from the 123 First Nations Health Centers in British Columbia (BC) on their views and perspectives of traditional models of wellness or traditional practices and medicines. This project is aimed at providing background information for the FN Health Society to undertake further work if needed, on promoting traditional models of wellness within BC for First Nations.
Online Resources
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Transformative and restorative processes: revisiting the question of efficacy of indigenous healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114979
Source
Med Anthropol. 2013;32(3):191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
James B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. j.waldram@usask.ca
Source
Med Anthropol. 2013;32(3):191-207
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Medical
Belize
Canada
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, Central American
Indians, North American
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Abstract
Studies of the efficacy of 'traditional' Indigenous healing often fail to consider the epistemologies that underlay specific healing traditions, especially intrinsic notions of efficacy. In this article, I critically engage the concept of efficacy by identifying two somewhat different approaches to the issue of outcome. In 'transformative' healing processes, healing is conceptualized as a journey in which the outcome goal is a transformed individual. Efficacy, then, is about incremental changes toward this goal. In 'restorative' healing processes, the goal is termination of the sickness and the restoration of health; efficacy is conceptualized as a return to a presickness state. These healing processes are illustrated with examples from the Q'eqchi Maya of Belize and Aboriginal peoples of Canada.
PubMed ID
23557005 View in PubMed
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Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Randall Sexton
Ellen Anne Buljo Stabbursvik
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, P.O. Box 6124, 9291, Tromsø, Norway. randallno@yahoo.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;34(4):571-89
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Norway
Population Groups
Shamanism
Abstract
There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today's tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today's changing global society.
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;45(7):607-1611056823
Cites: Am Psychol. 2002 Nov;57(11):962-7812564209
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):488-9720044966
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;42(2):295-31616114587
Cites: Eur J Hum Genet. 2007 Jan;15(1):115-2016985502
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;40(2):248-7712940648
PubMed ID
20862528 View in PubMed
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Is Hahnemann's therapeutic system a mystica?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122287
Source
S Afr Med J. 2012 Aug;102(8):640-1; author reply 641
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Herman Jeggels
Source
S Afr Med J. 2012 Aug;102(8):640-1; author reply 641
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Faith Healing - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Notes
Comment On: S Afr Med J. 2012 Mar;102(3 Pt 1):105-622380886
PubMed ID
22831927 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal peoples, health and healing approaches: the effects of age and place on health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139688
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Sylvia Abonyi
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Mississauga, Department of Geography, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Middle Aged
Social Identification
Young Adult
Abstract
For demographic reasons and as a result of a number of high profile health incidents in recent years, much of the health research and policy focus is on the younger cohorts of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. A critical examination of recent demographic trends reveals, however, that older cohorts of the Aboriginal population are increasing at a faster rate than younger cohorts, primarily due to improvements in life expectancy and declining fertility rates. Yet, there are surprisingly few health studies that have recognized the aging of the Aboriginal population. The overall goal of this paper is to examine differences in health status, use of conventional health care and traditional approaches to healing between older and younger cohorts of the Aboriginal population as well as to examine the importance of age as a determinant of health and health care use. Using data from the 2001 Statistics Canada Aboriginal Peoples Survey and contingency tables and logistic regression, the results demonstrate that older Aboriginal people face unique challenges - e.g. loss of traditional approaches to healing, geographic isolation, identity politics, constitutional and legal divisions within the Aboriginal community - with respect to their health and access to health services. These outcomes result from a colonial past and contemporary policies that affect all Aboriginal people.
PubMed ID
21036444 View in PubMed
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Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;47(3):491-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mary V Seeman
Author Affiliation
Department ofPsychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College St., Toronto,ON, M5T 1R8, Canada. mary.seeman@utoronto.ca
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;47(3):491-501
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dancing - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Ontario
Patient transfer
Philippines - ethnology
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Refugees - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Social Values
Spiritual Therapies
Treatment Failure
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper reflects the intersection of three cultures: the rave (all night dance party and use of the drug, Ecstasy) culture; the ward culture of an inpatient psychiatric program for First Episode Psychosis; the spirit healing culture of the Philippines. All three intersected in Toronto, Canada in the mid 1990s, as illustrated by the clinical case of a 19-year-old university student who was hospitalized with symptoms of drug-induced psychosis. Her initial treatment was not successful and presented dilemmas for the treating staff. Transfer to a second psychiatric facility that permitted attendance at a traditional Filipino healing ceremony resulted in a cure, with no recurrence 10 years later. According to James Dow's 1986 formulation, the components of the key spiritual healing session paralleled the very elements the young woman had sought by participating in raves, an activity that was problematic because it led to family displeasure. Whereas attendance at a rave triggered illness, the healing session, sanctioned by her family and taking place in their midst, resulted in healing.
PubMed ID
20688801 View in PubMed
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